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Education Life: The Disrupters

Education Life: The Disrupters | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Pioneering online upstarts are trying to transform higher education with things like programs intended to make college more affordable and those that dispense with the credit hour and classroom time with a professor in favor of self-paced online...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Anya Kamenetz writes about these pioneering programs in Education Life, The Times’s quarterly magazine about higher education. It’s part of a package of articles that highlight online experiments, including UniversityNowMinerva and University of the People – intended to make college more affordable as well as more convenient by tapping into web-based technology.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 12, 2013 9:41 AM

Disruptive new models have parents as well as prospective students looking and reconsidering.   More bloggers are writing  about the problems with large education debt (bankrupcy exempt.)  Economic cycles threaten to turn higher education into high priced vocational schools.


~  Deb

SCUP Links
Members of the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) scan higher education, inside and out, and present this curated collection of links, articles, and resources.
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SCUP Updates and Deadlines

Learn about upcoming deadlines and announcements.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:


Think Strategically Across Higher Education!


Chicago, IL
July 11–15, 2015

 
Call for Proposals is now open!
Deadline: October 1, 2014, 11:59pm Eastern 
______________________________________
Registration is open for the following events:

2014 Southern Symposium
September 18 | Miami, FL
Deadline: September 4 - Pre-Registration ends


2014 Southern Symposium
September 23 | Houston, TX
Deadline: September 9 - Pre-Registration ends


2014 Mid-Atlantic Symposium
October 13 | Towson, MD
Deadline: September 1 - Early-bird pricing ends


SCUP Planning Institute - Step I
October 19 | Orlando, FL
Deadline: August 11 - Scholarship program closes


2014 Southern Regional Conference
October 20-22 | Orlando, FL
Deadline: August 11 - Scholarship program closes
Deadline: September 8 - Early-bird pricing ends


2014 North Atlantic Symposium
October 24 | Stony Brook, NY
Deadline: September 10 - Early-bird pricing ends


SCUP Planning Institute - Step I
November 4 | Ontario, Canada
Deadline: August 22 - Scholarship program closes


2014 North Central Regional Conference
November 5-7 | Ontario, Canada
Deadline: August 22 - Scholarship program closes
Deadline: September 24 - Early-bird pricing ends


SCUP Planning Institute - Step III
January 16-17 | Tempe, AZ


2015 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference
March 8-10 | Norfolk, VA
Deadline: September 15 - Call for proposals closes


2015 Pacific Regional Conference
March 22-24 | Portland, OR
Deadline: October 10 - Call for proposals closes


2015 North Atlantic Regional Conference
April 12-14 | Providence, RI
Deadline: October 6 - Call for proposals closes

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Exploring Vocation: Reframing Undergraduate Education as a Quest for Purpose

Exploring Vocation: Reframing Undergraduate Education as a Quest for Purpose | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In sum, reflection on vocation taking place in a community of shared interest and support shifted the framing of higher education for both students and faculty. The three elements of the PTEV programs—vocational narrative as basic structure, the grounding of this narrative in learning communities, and the cultivation of reflective practices—invited students to experience their college education not as passive consumers but as protagonists in a serious enterprise with life-long consequences. These programs demonstrated that it is possible to recover the formative power of liberal education, even at a time when fixation upon its merely instrumental value threatens to overwhelm the deeper and more public ends of higher education."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

For 10 years the Lilly Endowment resourced a Program on the Theological Exploration of Vocation (PTEV) that appears to have strengthened liberal education on their campuses: 


"[T]his project challenged a group of 88 colleges and universities affiliated with a variety of Christian denominations, from Orthodox and Roman Catholic to Evangelical Protestant and Quaker, to think anew about what they were trying to achieve for their students (for a list of the campuses that participated, as well as articles discussing the PTEV, see the Lilly Endowment website at www.resourcingChristianity.org). The theme of life purpose, or 'vocation' in the language the project drew from the religious language of calling."

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Learning-Centric Data Scientists to Take Over Higher Ed

"Instructional designers were yesterday’s hot new member of the course development team. Today, the must-have course development team member (along with faculty and instructional designers and media specialist and librarians) is the data scientist.

And not just any data scientist.  A data scientist who is also an expert in program assessment.  A data scientist who is also a learning geek, steeped in all things Bloom and constructivist.

Maybe these learning-centric data scientists have always been wandering around campus.  Hanging out with the good people in Institutional Research, ensconced over at the Ed School.

From here on out the learning-focused data scientists are the new superstars.  The cool kids.  The big women and men on campus."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Well, not really. But they are one symptom of drastically changing times. "This is a shift away from the model of a solo professor creating / delivering / evaluating each course to a team-based and data-centric teaching model."

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Society for College and University Planning Names First President, Michael D. Moss

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is a new position and part of significant repositioning for SCUP's next fifty years..

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Natural light in office boosts health

Natural light in office boosts health | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Office workers with more natural light exposure at the office had longer sleep duration, better sleep quality, more physical activity and better quality of life compared to office workers with less light exposure in the workplace, a study shows. "There is increasing evidence that exposure to light, during the day, particularly in the morning, is beneficial to your health via its effects on mood, alertness and metabolism," said the senior study author.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

How about students? "Employees with windows in the workplace ... slept an average of 46 minutes more per night than employees who did not have the natural light exposure in the workplace. There also was a trend for workers in offices with windows to have more physical activity than those without windows."

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Trends— Why Not a Three-Day Work Week?

Trends— Why Not a Three-Day Work Week? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

One of the world's richest men, Carlos Slim, recently "proposed that the standard work schedule worldwide should be trimmed to three days a week. The current arrangement, he pointed out, was developed when life expectancy was lower and the world was, as a whole, poorer. Now, with people living longer and the structure of society shifting accordingly, a four-day weekend would improve quality of life, promote the development of other occupations, and healthier and more productive employees. Slim’s proposal included two important caveats: employees would work longer hours each day, and would continue to work into their seventies. (At Slim’s own company, Telmex, he is allowing workers past retirement age to keep working four-day weeks, at full salary.)"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Something's got to give. There aren't enough jobs.

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Change Magazine - May-June 2014

Change Magazine - May-June 2014 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In Short

  • An institutional commitment to preventive law helps create a positive campus culture by avoiding the need for formal legalistic procedures.

  • To promote an environment where people resolve disputes amicably, higher education attorneys must be problem solvers, critical thinkers, consensus builders, and patient risk managers.

  • Attorneys who can combine these skills with a healthy sense of humor will have one of the most interesting, engaging, rewarding professions ever."

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What College Can't Do & What Cartoons Can Do

What College Can't Do & What Cartoons Can Do | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"I just finished a fascinating blog post by Joshua Rothman called “What College Can’t Do.” There are so many insightful points in the essay that it wouldn’t make sense for me to cite just a quote or two. That wouldn’t do the piece justice. So I’ve decided to quote the whole damn thing instead. What follows is all Rothman except… well, I’ll let you figure that out."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Robert Mankoff using New Yorker cartoons to illustrate a brief essay by Joshua Rothman. A very nice way to spend some weekend leisure time. From a portion of the essay: 


"The presence of those old buildings can make you unreasonably optimistic; maybe modernity, like modernism, is just a historical period, a style. On the whole, though, the campus itself suggests the opposite: that modernity is an epoch—huge, dramatic, and irresistible—and that it is transforming the university."

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'Making the City of Lowell Downtown a College Town Is My Number-One Priority,' Says City Manager

'Making the City of Lowell Downtown a College Town Is My Number-One Priority,' Says City Manager | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"By traveling to Boston College football games across the country, City Manager Kevin Murphy, a BC alum, said he has seen true college towns like Clemson, S.C., that have plenty of businesses targeted at students.


When he looks at Lowell, Murphy said he sees something very different from a college town, but he is already working with local higher-education officials and others to try to change that.


'Making the city of Lowell downtown a college town is my number-one priority,' Murphy said in a recent meeting with The Sun's editorial board. 'That is paramount.'"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Who's going to help him plan that? [na]

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IT and Academics Don't Plan Together Much, New Survey Finds

IT and Academics Don't Plan Together Much, New Survey Finds | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

From the Campus Technology report: "Campus IT is a disjointed effort at most campuses. For example, in more than four out of five colleges and universities, IT professionals report that they do not regularly develop joint plans with academic departments for IT initiatives. These are some of the results that came out of a survey of 152 higher ed IT people in June by MeriTalk, a government-focused Web site."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

And: "Nearly six out of 10 don't survey academic or research staff on IT needs; and more than six out of 10 lack a catalog of IT services. Perhaps that's why 57 percent of end users view IT as the 'fix it' folks and just 22 percent say IT is considered a 'trusted ally.'"


The survey itself can be downloaded from this website.

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An Look at Adjunct Leaders' Views on Long-term Strategies

"Concordia adjuncts have strategically sought over time to 'permeate' the university’s governance structure, and serve – with compensation – on committees of all kinds, including hiring committees. That visibility has bred respect from the administration, she said, which is demonstrated by contract wins such as a $240,000 professional development fund specifically for part-time faculty."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Reporting from the Coalition of Contingent Academic Labor conference. There are a number of trends there which parallel or interact with other disruption/transformation trends with regard to faculty roles over time. For example, if you cannot deny the growing role of adjuncts, then why not invest in ensuring they are the best and have the resources to do their jobs well? Why not look at what else they can do, or what they will be doing?

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The Education Revolution Is Here Right Now -- Don't Miss It

The Education Revolution Is Here Right Now --  Don't Miss It | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"As we progress further into the digital age, the skill set requirements at our campuses will be different.  Really different.  The role of the faculty will change, moving from lecturing and teaching to mentoring and coaching.  Enrollment management for campus-based students is vastly different from management of online enrollment, and requires different skill sets.  Institutions will need to create new policies and governance structures to address online and digital learning. The rhythm of the internal operations at institutions will be vastly different in a digital world.  Just think about non-profit institutions having to respond in minutes or seconds, rather than weeks, to student inquiries.  In this new world, I think colleges will find it  difficult — very difficult —   to successfully  apply past policies and operational procedures to the digital market.  The people challenge will be both skill sets and the depth of available talent.  This will drive institutions to look at partnerships to outsource services with companies who have the depth of core competencies required to sustain an acceptable service level for students and results for the colleges.


Doss:     Well . . . In some ways, this future seems a bit grim, to say the least, for some incumbent institutions.  Do you think we are going to wake up one day and see colleges go out of business?


Beyer:   I am optimistic about the future of higher education."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Hmm: "On the other hand we may look back seven to ten years from now and ask where did all the colleges go?   I guess one way to think about this is that for sure there will be winners and losers."

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Getting a Handle on Performance-Based Funding

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Frequent SCUP speaker, Dennis P. Jones, is quoted as saying that “States are getting more sophisticated about what they’re doing and are crafting models that really reinforce institutional mission differentiation, rather than doing the same thing for everybody.” Jones is president of the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, whose October 2013 report, “Outcomes-Based Funding: The Wave of Implementation,” examines such policies. “They’re also putting a bigger share of the allocation into outcomes-based funding.”

This author concisely organizes this brief and informative resource, from AASCU's Public Policy magazine, under the primary heading of "A More Sophisticated Model," with these bullets.


  1. An Active Role for Stakeholders
  2. Differentiate Metrics and Rewards
  3. Make the Money Meaningful
  4. Make the Penalties Reasonable
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Complete this sentence: Restaurants are to food trucks as colleges are to __________

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Are to what? 

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The Unanswered Question: How Will We Pay for Aggressive Higher Ed Attainment Goals?

The Unanswered Question: How Will We Pay for Aggressive Higher Ed Attainment Goals? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Certainly there are limitations to the model described, some of which I have identified and others which I'm sure readers will point out. It is currently being modified to eliminate some of its shortcomings.


But as flawed as it may be, it serves to point out several key points. First, different approaches to attaining goals have different cost consequences.


Second, in almost all scenarios, resources required by community colleges outstrip those that will be required by four-year institutions. This is a direct contradiction to priorities typically assigned in the appropriation process. Institutional costs can be reduced under an assumption of marginal costs being less than average costs, but this doesn't change the need to assign priority to funding for those institutions that will have to do the heavy lifting if attainment goals are to be met.


Third, the largest component of costs in both scenarios is student financial aid. The real-world examples reinforce the point made earlier in this paper that concentrated attention to the design of financial-aid programs is perhaps the key element in the development of cost-effective means of reaching aggressive attainment goals.


Finally, it drives home the point that reaching such goals will take substantial additional resources. Ways can be found to mitigate these costs, but success will be impossible without additional state investments."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"Dennis Jones, [a frequent SCUP presenter,] is president of NCHEMS, a nonprofit research-and-development center founded to improve strategic decision making in institutions and agencies of higher education. Jones is widely recognized for his work in such areas as developing public agendas to guide higher-education policymaking; financing, budgeting, and resource allocation; linking higher education with states' workforce and economic-development needs; and developing information to inform policymaking.

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A Century of Campus Planning: Past, Present, and Future —complimentary download from 'Planning for Higher Education'

A Century of Campus Planning: Past, Present, and Future —complimentary download from 'Planning for Higher Education' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
  1. This article was previously published in Facilities Manager magazine as part of APPA's 100th anniversary celebration. 
  2. It is shared here [pdf], for those who are not SCUP members, only through Sunday, August 24.
  3. Share your memories of the last 50 years of higher education planning on SCUP's 50th anniversary page.


"For most of its history, higher education in America was an experience that only the elite could enjoy. As a result, throughout the 19th century, higher education institutions became increasingly steeped in tradition and resistant to change. Things stayed about the same until World War II, which forced colleges and universities to face some huge challenges. For example, in 1944 the G.I. Bill enabled more than two million returning veterans to enter the higher education system.


'Higher education became more accessible and was no longer entirely the domain of the elite or the upper echelon,' says Persis C. Rickes, president and principal with Rickes Associates, a higher education planning firm in Attleboro, Massachusetts. 'Instead, it became the golden ticket to achieving the American Dream.' The nation’s higher education system was greatly challenged by this surge of students—in response, many institutions expanded facilities quickly, cheaply, and with minimal planning. ...


Going forward, most experts agree the pace of change will accelerate dramatically. Financial challenges, both capital and operational, will be the key drivers of facility planning in the future.


'Alternatives to the traditional higher education pipeline, such as badges and "unbundling," will lead to a reconceptualization of what it means to obtain a degree,' notes Rickes. 'While the residential collegiate experience will remain viable for some institutions, many others will be challenged to explore ways to reposition themselves in order to remain competitive, doing more with less.'”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
MILESTONES IN CAMPUS AND FACILITIES PLANNING

1860s: Morrill Act of 1862 (Land-Grant School Act)

1890s: Columbian Exposition (showed America how beautiful and functional a planned campus can be)

1940s: World War II and the G.I. Bill

1940s–1950s: Colorado and California create space guidelines in an attempt to control and optimize campus space

1950s: Creation of the Western Interstate Commission of Higher Education (WICHE)

1950s: Brown vs. Board of Education eliminated segregated educational institutions

1960s: Richard P. Dober published his landmark book, Campus Planning

1960s: Higher Education Act of 1964 (created more access to higher education)

1970s–present: Widespread use of cars on campus (traffic and parking have enormous impacts on the campus environment)

1990s–present: Widespread adoption of the Internet and distance learning

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Ex-Googler Creates Slick Kit to Turn Your Kid’s iPad Into a Teacher

Ex-Googler Creates Slick Kit to Turn Your Kid’s iPad Into a Teacher | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Many parents lament the amount of time their children spend glued to iPads, but instead of reaching for the parental controls, ex-Google engineer Pramod Sharma figured out how to harness its addictive powers as an educational tool. The result, called Osmo, uses the iPad’s cameras and display to turn any kitchen table into an interactive learning lab. ... Osmo uses letter tiles, colored blocks, random dinosaur action figures, and even a kid’s stick figure drawings as video game controllers when placed in the camera’s field of view. Osmo’s sophisticated vision systems recognizes the objects and uses them to trigger animations and effects on screen. Now, with over a million dollars in pre-orders, Osmo is on its way to market just in time for the Christmas season and Sharma is sharing background on the design process."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

So, just how are we planning for higher education? What will "higher ed" look like when these kids turn 18 in, what, 2028? 

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MIT Wristband Could Make AC Obsolete?

MIT Wristband Could Make AC Obsolete? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A team of students at MIT is working on a prototype wearable that asks one important question: Why heat or cool a building when you could heat or cool a person?
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Good question. This is especially promising for attending professional conferences. But, seriously, what if individuals could control their own perceptions of being hot or cold, with mush less regard to the microenvironment they are in? How would this change AEC? Design? Learning?

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New Law Requires Public Colleges to Extend Tuition Breaks to Veterans

New Law Requires Public Colleges to Extend Tuition Breaks to Veterans | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"[T]he Veterans' Access to Care Through Choice, Accountability, and Transparency Act of 2014 (HR 3230) requires [public] institutions to charge in-state tuition to veterans—regardless of how long they have lived in the state—within three years of the veterans’ discharge from active duty. Some dependents of veterans would also be eligible for the resident rates. Universities that do not offer the reduced rates could become ineligible to receive federal veteran-education dollars."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

But ... "Some public colleges say the new law will force institutions to shoulder an expensive burden. In June the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities implored Congress to let public institutions set their own prices, calling the tuition measure 'essentially an allocation of state, not federal, resources.'"

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The feds tried to rate colleges in 1911. It was a disaster.

The feds tried to rate colleges in 1911. It was a disaster. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"At the turn of the 20th century, college was for the elite. Less than 3 percent of the US population had a bachelor's degree in 1910; just 14 percent had even finished high school.


Still, the number of colleges in the US had nearly doubled in the previous 50 years.And the new Association of American Universities was confronting a pressing question, according to David Webster, whowrote in 1984 about the early federal rating system in the History of Education Quarterly: When students applied to graduate school, how could universities know how good their undergraduate education was?


So the association did something that would be unthinkable in higher education today. It asked the federal government to step in.

The US Bureau of Education's top higher education official, Kendric Babcock, a former college president, agreed to tackle the question. Babcock thought he could create a rating system for more than 600 colleges that could judge "exactly the worth of the degrees granted by the widely varying institutions in the United States" and be accepted both in the US and abroad as an indicator of quality.


This turned out to be wildly optimistic."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"The uproar made it all the way to President William Howard Taft, who issued an executive order banning the distribution of the ratings developed by his own federal agency. The next president, Woodrow Wilson, who had spent much of his life in academia, let Taft's order stand despite pressure from the Association of American Universities to rescind it."

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Location, Location, Location. Urban Hot Spots Are the Place to Be [for campuses]

Location, Location, Location.  Urban Hot Spots Are the Place to Be [for campuses] | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

#scup49 plenary speaker Jeff Selingo's latest in The Chronicle of Higher Education: "Unlike homeowners, colleges looking for a better neighborhood can’t simply hang up a "For Sale" sign and move on. Such colleges need to work harder to provide amenities and out-of-the-classroom opportunities for their students. Some colleges are trying to take on the role of a chamber of commerce, revitalizing abandoned properties nearby and helping to cultivate start-ups. Such efforts, though, are often beyond the expertise of campus officials and carry large price tags without an obvious or quick return on the investment."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Hundreds of campuses lose potential students to those in more desirable locations. Since it's really hard to pick up a campus (think American University in Cairo) and move it, Selingo suggests growing the trend to stepping across campus edges and making the neghborhood/city a more attractive one.

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Making room for Maker’s Space

Making room for Maker’s Space | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"'Philosophically, school is really good at nouns,' said Stager, founder of the Constructing Modern Knowledge institute. 'We ought to be focusing more on verbs. For some reason, we’re talking about putting Maker’s Spaces places as opposed to putting (in) making places'


'I like to say that the greatest Maker’s Space is in between your ears,' he also said. 'It’s a stance. It’s a way of recognizing that I have the confidence and competence to solve any problem I confront, even if only to discover that I need to learn a lot more.'"


That said, both of them agreed that the physical environment of a school matters when adopting the maker approach. They just don’t want to see a Maker’s Space materialize as a bunker down the hall."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Lots of talk about Maker Spaces. What are you doing on your campus?

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Yes, Master’s: A Graduate Degree’s Moment in the Age of Higher Education Innovation

Yes, Master’s: A Graduate Degree’s Moment in the Age of Higher Education Innovation | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Therefore, to truly enable economic mobility in our society, we must acknowledge the master’s degree’s growing role as employers’ preferred or required educational qualification for many middle and professional-class jobs. Furthermore, in addition to the economic benefits of master’s-level education to individuals and employers, researchers have illustrated that greater levels of educational attainment are associated with higher levels of societal and community engagement and well-being."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The author, Sean Gallagher, is chief strategy officer at Northeastern University. Does an evolved Master's degree have a stronger role to play in the future of some higher ed institutions?

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Kelly Brenner Smith's curator insight, August 8, 7:39 PM

Just something to think about when planning your educational journey ....

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Great (Un-funded) Expectations: Integration, Innovation and Collaboration for Quality, Sustainable Higher Education

Great (Un-funded) Expectations: Integration, Innovation and Collaboration for Quality, Sustainable Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it


Scholarship Applications
Deadline: August 22

Early-Bird Registration
Deadline: September 24

Sign up to be a convener!

Join us in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, for the 2014 North Central Regional Conference! This conference will focus on innovative approaches to challenging planning contexts.


We will showcase ways institutions and organizations are managing in an environment of increasing compliance requirements, regulation, accountability, and ever-shrinking funding levels. By taking an integrated planning approach, they will also show you how to leverage synergies across the campus to operate effectively and efficiently while they support the core mission of higher education.


As a higher education leader, you are constantly faced with evolving—and in some cases revolutionizing—financial, academic, physical, and infrastructure practices to meet the challenges of today and tomorrow. The challenges have prompted new approaches and innovative solutions that defy traditional planning models. These new advances are re-shaping everything from partnerships, to new models of delivery, and sustainability. Let’s explore and examine new approaches to planning together, and learn from the experiences of other thought leaders in higher education.

The SCUP North Central Conference Planning Committee invites policy makers, higher ed leaders, and organizations to engage in an imperative dialogue and look at ways to position our institutions for a successful, sustainable future. 

Join us in Canada!

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Registration is open!

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Offices are Personal, Workplaces are Functional—Why do we have 2–4x as much office space as classroom space on campus?

Offices are Personal, Workplaces are Functional—Why do we have 2–4x as much office space as classroom space on campus? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Since offices typically comprise two to four times as much space on campus as classrooms, why don’t we hear more about improving office environments?"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Michael Haggans at CampusMatters.net is touching the third rail this week: "Facilities managers have a good sense of how seldom faculty offices are occupied. They are loath to use this information lest they be seen as accusing faculty members of shirking their responsibilities. The real issue is the significant change in patterns of office use since the mid-20th century."

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"Building Excellence from the Ground Up: Stony Brook at 50 Years, October 24

"Building Excellence from the Ground Up: Stony Brook at 50 Years, October 24 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

This symposium will reflect on Stony Brook University's rapid development into a leading public research university, examine several initiatives that have transformed the Stony Brook campus, and discuss its challenges and opportunities in maintaining a research university for the coming decades.


Learning Outcomes:


  1. Review the development history of the campus, a process characterized by growing enrollments, rapid expansion, and continuous improvement to deepen an understanding of how to foster academic excellence in a public university.
  2. Discover how an institution reinvented itself from a rough-at-the-edges campus, through site restoration, environmental sustainability and energy reductions into a more sustainable environment.
  3. Investigate various methods used to maintain, renew, re-purpose, or replace ageing research facilities to better support modern scientific effort and contrast results obtained from the different approaches.
  4. Recognize how campus life and residential programs shape the quality and character of campus experience, thereby impacting student achievement, student engagement, student retention rates, and their lifelong associations with a newly creating university.


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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

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