SCUP Links
Follow
Find
70.5K views | +90 today
SCUP Links
Members of the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) scan higher education, inside and out, and present this curated collection of links, articles, and resources. www.scup.org
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

The Difference Between Instructivism, Constructivism, And Connectivism

The Difference Between Instructivism, Constructivism, And Connectivism | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
We spend so much time in education trying to make things better. Better policies. Better technology. Better standards. Better curriculum. Better instruction. Better assessment. Better response to assessment data.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, December 15, 2013 12:21 PM

Amazing

John McDermott Neill's curator insight, December 18, 2013 3:15 AM

A brief attempt to define these overlapping ideas.

Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) from Social Media Content Curation
Scoop.it!

The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part I

The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part I | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Excerpt from article written and curated by Robin Good and first published on MasterNewMedia:
"Content curation tools are in their infancy. Nonetheless you see so many of them around, there are more new curation tools coming your way soon, with lots of new features and options.

Enormous progress has been made since the early days of the first news curation tools to what is available today, but yet, I feel we have only barely scratched the surface.

To illustrate what I expect to see on this front, here is a panoramic tour of the traits, features, patterns and trends that I expect will characterize the future of digital content curation tools, organized into specific feature areas.

1) Display Formats of Curated Content Collections
The first area in which I expect to see lots of improvement and innovative ideas is the one of how a curated collection or stream can be displayed to the user.
This is one of the most underestimated and underutilized areas of improvement for content curation tools.

2) Slicing and Dicing
Some of the present-day content curation tools, including Scoop.it, Spundge and several others, do allow you to tag and filter content but none provides a direct facility to easily create sub-sets that gather together collection items with the same characteristics.

3) Micro - Macro
One other badly needed feature, that I hope will see its way in some of the leading content curation tools, is the ability to instantly switch from a bird’s eye view of a topic to the detailed view of a specific information item.

4) Recurate
Another area that offers great opportunities for innovation and for the introduction of new useful features is the one covering the ability to assess, managing inventories, organize and curate one’s own existing assets.

5) News Discovery
The main problem with news discovery arises from the fact that quality filters and algorithms capable of both fully understanding the topic of interest, not just by way of a keyword or a hashtag but by semantic inference, and capable of identifying the relevant sources among so many noise-making content marketers reposting other people stuff, are not easy to build.
The best way to uncover, identify and identify new quality sources and content items may be to employ a balanced mix of automated search filters augmented by human curators that can supervise, edit, refine and improve on what is gathered by the algos.

6) Ownership
The main benefit offered by content curation platforms that require you to curate and publish first via their systems (Scoop.it, Pinterest, etc.) is that they provide you with an existing broad audience readily interested in your content. For someone just starting out online, this can be a huge booster.
The con side of the equation is that your rights on what you have curated as well as the physical ownership of that content is not under your control anymore. And for those already having good visibility and reputation online, this may not be the most attractive proposition.

7) Credit and Attribution
For professional curators the need to properly and systematically credit and attribute the content and sources utilized is not a secondary matter. Discovery of new interesting content is at the heart of the curator job, and facilitating the exchange on meta-data that provides credit and hints as to who has been of help in discovering something will increasingly be a highly valued activity..."

Each point is analyzed with more information and external links. Read full, interesting and detailed article here:
http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part1/

 

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
more...
Ajo Monzó's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:20 PM

Thanks!

Debbie Elicksen 's curator insight, December 20, 2013 1:49 PM

Scooping this to basically reference it for more tips on curating. We are all works in progress.

Russell Yardley's curator insight, December 25, 2013 1:01 PM

With billions of people connected through social media and directly connected with email traditional curators of news and other content have had their business models destroyed but it has not surprisingly taken many years for better models to emerge. 

 

The widsom of crowds is well known but so is their stupidity (stock market crashes, group think, lowest common denominator in election outcomes...). Better curating tools and systems are beginning to show that valuable curators of the worlds content are able to find their audience and enrich the world with deep insight that replace the extremely low numbers of curators of the past (news paper barons).

 

Some of these curators will be paid and others do it just for the joy of it. Collectively they will reshape thinking and ultimately the world. 

Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for Building Additions or Adaptive Reuse, Ohio State University

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for Building Additions or Adaptive Reuse, Ohio State University | SCUP Links | Scoop.it


The jury said, “ . . . great that they did not take down the towers . . . connector is a nice contrast . . .interiors are appealing . . . great use of color.”


The new policy to house all freshmen and sophomores on campus at Ohio State University (OSU) created a need to increase housing capacity. Three areas were identified to create density, foster a more dynamic student experience, and sustainably leverage existing infrastructure. Additions of bed capacity, program, utility/sustainability regeneration, and improvements to the district civic space for recreation use and passive open space were planned.


One area was the South High-Rise District. By inserting connectors between two existing eleven-story residential towers, new entry lobbies, student social and study spaces, additional beds, and newly-defined courtyards were added. Anchoring the additions
to the existing infrastructure of bathrooms, stairs, and elevators, the project  delivered beds at a reduced cost (an average of $50,000/ bed).


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Georgia Institute of Technology

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Georgia Institute of Technology | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The shop-like facility has a clear three-part organiza­tion of high-bay, mid-bay, and computa­tional laboratories separated by a shared utility zone to enhance flexibility.


The team used an integrated planning, design and construction (“IPD light”) process that emphasized “passive design first.” The site design reflects the Institute’s sustainability goal to move towards a more natural ecology and dramatically increase water conservation, efficiency and quality. Decisions were based on a conceptual, sustainable return-on-invest­ment idea and a common sense approach to doing the right thing.


The jury said, “ . . . tough building type . . .  honest expression, nothing superfluous, beautifully planned and detailed, appropriate for its program  . . . like restraint, quiet building . . .  much more confident than other buildings that try too hard . . .”.


The building energy demand is now 54% less than the baseline energy model, and PVs generate 26% of the baseline energy demand, resulting in an 80% energy offset.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Bing Concert Hall, Stanford University

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Bing Concert Hall, Stanford University | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Responding to the Arcadian quality of the surrounding Stanford Arboretum, the site design brings landscape into the building, appearing more like a clearing in the woods than an urban building with hard edges. It is a critical element of the campus arts district. Architecture and landscape create a series of gathering spaces to the north, west and south, fully engaging the setting.


The jury said, “ . . . elegant proportions . . . nice fit in context of campus . . . well crafted, beautiful materials and simplicity . . .”


The central element is an 842-seat vineyard style concert hall and includes a studio/rehearsal hall, artists’ suites, a music library, instrument storage rooms designed to double as practice rooms, an artists’ lounge and generous public amenities.


The seating sections split into terraces ringing the stage and create an intimate concert experience for both audience and performer.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Superstition Mountain Campus, Central Arizona College

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Superstition Mountain Campus, Central Arizona College | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The jury said, “ . . . refreshing . . . outstanding systematic approach . . . sculptural building, wonderful gesture . . . ” new jewel box lays ground for future building sites . . .can change people lives . . . structure expressed in powerful way.”


College Center nearly doubled the square footage of the campus. The building layout was organized with two centers; one center defined by a large folded ceiling that spans open learning spaces with floor to ceiling glass; the second by a group of five science teaching labs with a technical focus. A bridge occupied by offices and lounges links the two centers and provides an academic link between functions.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, John Jay College of Law

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, John Jay College of Law | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The new building symbolizes John Jay’s evolu­tion, doubling the school’s interdisciplinary sciences, transforms the College into a 21st century research institution, and establishes a new identity and civic presence.


The jury said “ . . . great example of excellent university building in difficult dense urban context . . . solves multiple problems and creates new exciting college space in the city. . . . dynamic space . . . challenging site, made a huge impact . . .”


The 625,000-square-foot building integrates all functions of a traditional college campus into a single city block. A 500-foot-long stepped social cascade, initiating at the fifth floor cafeteria and descending four stories to the main student entrance, provides leisure space for social and academic interaction between students, faculty, and administrators.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This project is at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, an example of a vertical campus theme. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, Tulane University

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, Tulane University | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Tulane University was dealt a major blow by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, which caused more than $650 million damage to its downtown and uptown campuses. Just days before, equipment was positioned to drive piles for what is now known as Weatherhead Hall. The project went on hold while Tulane repaired damage and created a renewal plan. The university clarified its vision and accelerated plans for undergraduate living and learning.


Weatherhead functions as part of a main campus entry, and builds upon New Orleans vernacular that stems from a strong program model and massing.


The jury said “ . . . it is all about community and gathering space . . . successful . . . friendly . . . under­stated clean plan, good neighbor, and good design elements . . .if every residence did this, it would be great . . . ”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This faculty residence project is at Tulane University. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

How One College Boosted Female STEM Graduates–Fast

How One College Boosted Female STEM Graduates–Fast | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The story of how Harvey Mudd College quadrupled its women computer-science graduates in just six years shows how quickly a concerted effort by one organization can shift the balance. 

Even though the 777-student college, which was named for the mining engineer who founded it in the 1950s, specializes in engineering, science, math and computer science, women computer-science majors in 2006 comprised a disappointing 10% of the graduating class.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Now: "Females now make up about 45% of the college’s computer science grads, a percentage that reflects the male-female balance on campus as a whole, and is quadruple the 2006 figure."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

new book— The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World: Howard Gardner, Katie Davis

The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World [Howard Gardner, Katie Davis] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We're reading this.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Rutgers University's Hurricane Sandy Report

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Much to learn in this report.“While there were many positive findings, the university knows there are always opportunities to learn and improve,” Keleman added.Most of the recommendations for improvement identified in the review have been implemented, including:refining response protocols;improving protection of information and communication infrastructure;identifying alternative work sites for staff in the event of relocation; andincreasing social media links on the campus status page.Other recommendations are in the process of being implemented, such as upgrading generator systems and increasing emergency supplies in residence halls and other locations on all campuses. Rutgers will continue to solicit input and support from the entire university community to further improve emergency management systems and practices.The report, which was developed largely for internal planning purposes, was thoroughly reviewed to ensure that advisory information and specifics of university security remained confidential, can be found here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Blog post comparing academe to a drug gang provokes much discussion

Scott Jaschick reviews a currently popular blog post that compares the behavior of newly minted PhDs to those who seek to join drug gangs.


Then [the blogger] turns to academe and finds very similar conditions. "The academic job market is structured in many respects like a drug gang, with an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core of insiders. Even if the probability that you might get shot in academia is relatively small (unless you mark student papers very harshly), one can observe similar dynamics," he writes. "Academia is only a somewhat extreme example of this trend, but it affects labor markets virtually everywhere....  Academic systems more or less everywhere rely at least to some extent on the existence of a supply of 'outsiders' ready to forgo wages and employment security in exchange for the prospect of uncertain security, prestige, freedom and reasonably high salaries that tenured positions entail."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Here's the original blog post.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

It’s been 30 years since I developed the notion of “multiple intelligences.” I have been gratified by the interest shown in this idea and the ways it’s been used in schools, museums, and businesses around the world. But one unanticipated consequence has driven me to distraction—and that’s the tendency of many people, including persons whom I cherish, to credit me with the notion of ‘learning styles’ or to collapse ‘multiple intelligences’ with ‘learning styles.’ It’s high time to relieve my pain and to set the record straight.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Gardner summarizes:


As an educator, I draw three primary lessons for educators:


1. Individualize your teaching as much as possible. Instead of “one size fits all,” learn as much as you can about each student, and teach each person in ways that they find comfortable and learn effectively. Of course this is easier to accomplish with smaller classes. But ‘apps’ make it possible to individualize for everyone.


2. Pluralize your teaching. Teach important materials in several ways, not just one (e.g. through stories, works of art, diagrams, role play). In this way you can reach students who learn in different ways. Also, by presenting materials in various ways, you convey what it means to understand something well. If you can only teach in one way, your own understanding is likely to be thin.


3. Drop the term “styles.” It will confuse others and it won’t help either you or your students.

more...
Julie Ekner Koch's curator insight, December 9, 2013 2:14 AM

Important points about individualized teaching

Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) from Socialearning
Scoop.it!

MOOCs: How did we get here ? by Georges Siemens

Presented to 10th Annual Open Education Conference Park City, Utah

Via Frederic DOMON
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Worthy. From one of the people who coined the term, MOOC.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

U.S. Colleges Finding Ideals Tested Abroad

U.S. Colleges Finding Ideals Tested Abroad | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Universities with programs in countries with autocratic governments are wrestling with how to respond to actions that fly in the face of democratic principles.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

“I think engagement is more important than rules right now,” said Allan Goodman, the president of the Institute of International Education. “It’s in our institute’s DNA to advocate engagement, because that process is what brings change.”

Kenneth Roth, the executive director of Human Rights Watch, cautioned that universities must be prepared to revoke partnerships that violate basic principles of freedom. “I do see value in liberal education, but you have to ask on what terms,” he said. “If a country like China wants to legitimize a cramped version of liberal education by attracting prestigious Western universities, there’s a real possibility of those universities compromising the values on which they were built because they’re so eager to get into China.”

Some universities, including Columbia, have created study centers rather than branch campuses, in part to avoid commitments that would be hard to break.

more...
Mikeyy's curator insight, December 19, 2013 7:29 AM

 It is interesting to gather some information of other countries college programs and the different styles of learning they use. CIS120 Michael Gonzalez

Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for Building Additions or Adaptive Reuse, HEC Montreal

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for Building Additions or Adaptive Reuse, HEC Montreal | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Decelles is located in a district where new development is restricted so the school had to look inward for solutions.


Most of the classrooms and the amphitheater on the 3rd and 4th floors were built in the closed-in style of the 70s. They no longer met the needs of the school’s pedagogical requirements, classroom numbers and capacity. The renovation needed to achieve a contemporary intervention with architectural language and up-to-date technology without altering the character of the original building and spatial organization.


Natural and artificial lighting play a major role in the ambiance inside the building. The five bay windows and skylight on the 4th floor are harmonious inserts in the concrete envelope. They stand out with their lightness and simplicity. The generated light gives back life to common spaces and opens new perspectives to the urban landscape.


The jury said, “ . . . very clever . . . another creative example of adding on massive concrete 70s building . . . best example of recent past . . .”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, University of British Columbia

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Colorado School of Mines

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Colorado School of Mines | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Marquez Hall is the new home of the Petroleum Engineering department, sited to create a vital connection between the existing campus and a future Earth Science Quad. It facilitates connections be­tween students and faculty, departments and disci­plines, campus spaces and the greater geography of the Rocky Mountain Front Range, creates an arrival point to campus from the town of Golden; and provides inviting open space.


The jury said, “ . . . liked the way the building responded to campus context . . . execution is lovely, materials and detailing exemplary . . . design is quite responsive . . .”


The building forms a sunlit southern edge to a new plaza with a public lobby and exhibit spaces. It has three spacial elements: a bar of labs on the north, a bar of faculty offices on the south, and the general classroom wing to the east. Users can easily under­stand and navigate the facility. Interaction between students, faculty and research teams is enhanced.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Kenyon College

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Kenyon College | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

At Kenyon College, art history forms the bridge between studio practice and the liberal arts curricu­lum. The integrated planning process to create a new Studio Arts Building and new Gallery & Art History Building involved Kenyon administration, faculty and students, and resulted in two distinct, but interre­lated initiatives. Bringing these facilities into the center of campus was a priority.


The building was located on a very prominent site, directly on Middle Path, in the heart of the historic core, to increase the visibility and participa­tion of the arts.


The two-story building with a basement includes a large 6,100 square-foot gallery, a smaller secondary gallery, an entry and lower level lobby for public gatherings, a 136-seat auditorium, classroom, seminar room, curatorial classroom, and a 3,400 square-foot art storage space.


The jury said, “ . . . the way it fits on campus is clear . . . confidence and clarity of materiality . . . forms are crisp . . . building is about art, history of art . . . building is like a piece of pottery or sculpture . . . it may stand the test of time . . . ”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Accreditors Now Find Themselves Under Critical Review

Accreditors Now Find Themselves Under Critical Review | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Amid higher education's rapid changes, the continuing value of the lengthy, complex accreditation process is raising skeptical questions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Moody’s Issues a Negative Outlook for Higher Education

Moody’s Investors Service on Monday issued a negative outlook for higher education in 2014—which should come as a surprise to no one. The bond-rating agency’s report last week, a survey of net-tuition revenues, was grim, and its outlook for higher education in recent years has been mostly bleak.


This year Moody’s cited a weak economy that will “affect families’ willingness and ability to pay for higher education.” It also anticipated federal budget pressures, including a looming sequestration threat, that could affect financial aid. ... 


[I]t’s hard to argue with another threat outlined by the rating agency: that expenses are outpacing revenue for the higher-education sector. “After multiple years of stagnant capital investment and tightened control of operating spending, pressure is building to invest in capital, information systems, faculty compensation, and program renewal,” the Moody’s report says.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Boosting California's Postsecondary Education

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

An excellent report, primarily authored by Patrick Callan, from The Council on Economic Development. The appendix, "Examples of Good Practices and Policy for Boosting Higher Education Productivity," is five pages of useful practice summaries from a number of other states.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Are Ivy League Schools Really Offering the Best Architectural Education?

Are Ivy League Schools Really Offering the Best Architectural Education? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"What this shows is that there are two fundamentally different ways of teaching taking place in US architecture schools. On the one hand are the Ivy League schools, with a focus on design and theory; on the other are schools focusing on the practical aspects of construction and sustainability. Both types of architectural teaching are finding success, with Harvard being first overall for its Graduate program, and Cal Poly first overall for its Undergraduate program.


Should we be surprised that Ivy League schools are finding success in the traditionally ‘academic’ aspects of training, while a Polytechnic is leading in teaching technical expertise? Perhaps not. What is more intriguing is that while professionals are obviously highly appreciative of both styles of teaching, in the case of the Ivy League schools this admiration seems to be one way traffic."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Like most unhealthy relationships, correcting this problem will require compromises from both sides. The profession has to find a way to position itself closer to the Ivy League graduate’s conception of architecture, and Ivy League schools really ought to be educating students in a way that doesn’t leave them alienated by the realities of making buildings.


How might schools do this? The answer may lie in those “very nearly mutually exclusive” lists from earlier. The University of Southern California seems to be producing uniquely balanced architects, appearing on four of the five lists highlighted and six of the eight lists in total, with their undergraduate program ranked 7th overall. Sadly, the statistics can’t tell us exactly how they achieve this balance – but this university may be one to watch in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Turning Education Upside Down

Turning Education Upside Down | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
“Flipped schools,” where students watch video lessons at home and do “homework” in class, are showing early promise in improving learning.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

At Clintondale Higher School, north of Detroit, the entire curriculum was "flipped" three years ago; and they like the results:


This is the second and far more important shift that comes with flipped classrooms: it frees up class time for hands-on work. Students learn by doing and asking questions — school shouldn’t be a spectator sport. ”A lot of people think it just has to do with technology,” said Kim Spriggs, who teaches business and marketing. “It’s actually more time for kids to do higher-order thinking and hands-on projects. Instead of presenting the information in class and having students work on projects at home, where they don’t necessarily have support, here in class, one-on-one or in small groups, I can help them immediately.” Students can also help each other, a process that benefits both the advanced and less advanced learners.


Flipping also changes the distribution of teacher time. In a traditional class, the teacher engages with the students who ask questions — but it’s those who don’t ask who tend to need the most attention. “We refer to ‘silent failers,’ ” said Spriggs. “Now it’s a lot harder for students to hide. The teacher can see pretty much where every student’s understanding is and how to help them. It’s a huge difference for students who didn’t seek out extra help and attention — who just sit back and keep silent.”


Clintondale’s experience indicates that the biggest effect of flipping classrooms is on the students at the bottom. “It’s tough to fail a flipped class, because you’re doing the stuff in here,” said Rob Dameron, the head of the English department. “I used to have about a 30 percent failure rate in English – these kids come in a lot at third-grade, fourth-grade reading levels. Now, out of 130 kids, I have three who are failing — mostly due to attendance problems.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Scoop.it!

Indian Universities Still Lag in World Rankings

Indian Universities Still Lag in World Rankings | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The three ranking surveys use methodologies that emphasize academic research and faculty citation in journals, followed by other measures like employer reputation, academic reputation, faculty-student ratio, and the international composition of faculty and students. Indian universities lose out on many of these fronts. In addition to lack of research citations, they perform badly on other metrics like faculty-to-student ratios and lack of internationalism.


To be sure, there is a debate around rankings methodology and whether it is fair to rate Indian universities against older and richer Western institutions.


“India has domestic priorities to educate more young people,” said Phil Baty, editor of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. Still, he said, “there should be an elite group of institutions that focus on global competitiveness.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Intense: "Competition to get into elite state-run colleges is fierce. Last year, 512,000 applicants sought admission for 9,647 spots in the 15 technology institutes and the Indian School of Mines. Indian news media regularly report on the exorbitant percentages required of graduating high school students to gain a spot at state-run institutions like Delhi University or Bombay University, sometimes upward of 99 percent in certain colleges for degrees in commerce or technology."

more...
No comment yet.