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Members of the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) scan higher education, inside and out, and present this curated collection of links, articles, and resources. www.scup.org
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2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, University of British Columbia

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

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2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Colorado School of Mines

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Colorado School of Mines | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Marquez Hall is the new home of the Petroleum Engineering department, sited to create a vital connection between the existing campus and a future Earth Science Quad. It facilitates connections be­tween students and faculty, departments and disci­plines, campus spaces and the greater geography of the Rocky Mountain Front Range, creates an arrival point to campus from the town of Golden; and provides inviting open space.


The jury said, “ . . . liked the way the building responded to campus context . . . execution is lovely, materials and detailing exemplary . . . design is quite responsive . . .”


The building forms a sunlit southern edge to a new plaza with a public lobby and exhibit spaces. It has three spacial elements: a bar of labs on the north, a bar of faculty offices on the south, and the general classroom wing to the east. Users can easily under­stand and navigate the facility. Interaction between students, faculty and research teams is enhanced.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

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2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Kenyon College

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Kenyon College | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

At Kenyon College, art history forms the bridge between studio practice and the liberal arts curricu­lum. The integrated planning process to create a new Studio Arts Building and new Gallery & Art History Building involved Kenyon administration, faculty and students, and resulted in two distinct, but interre­lated initiatives. Bringing these facilities into the center of campus was a priority.


The building was located on a very prominent site, directly on Middle Path, in the heart of the historic core, to increase the visibility and participa­tion of the arts.


The two-story building with a basement includes a large 6,100 square-foot gallery, a smaller secondary gallery, an entry and lower level lobby for public gatherings, a 136-seat auditorium, classroom, seminar room, curatorial classroom, and a 3,400 square-foot art storage space.


The jury said, “ . . . the way it fits on campus is clear . . . confidence and clarity of materiality . . . forms are crisp . . . building is about art, history of art . . . building is like a piece of pottery or sculpture . . . it may stand the test of time . . . ”

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The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

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Accreditors Now Find Themselves Under Critical Review

Accreditors Now Find Themselves Under Critical Review | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Amid higher education's rapid changes, the continuing value of the lengthy, complex accreditation process is raising skeptical questions.
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Moody’s Issues a Negative Outlook for Higher Education

Moody’s Investors Service on Monday issued a negative outlook for higher education in 2014—which should come as a surprise to no one. The bond-rating agency’s report last week, a survey of net-tuition revenues, was grim, and its outlook for higher education in recent years has been mostly bleak.


This year Moody’s cited a weak economy that will “affect families’ willingness and ability to pay for higher education.” It also anticipated federal budget pressures, including a looming sequestration threat, that could affect financial aid. ... 


[I]t’s hard to argue with another threat outlined by the rating agency: that expenses are outpacing revenue for the higher-education sector. “After multiple years of stagnant capital investment and tightened control of operating spending, pressure is building to invest in capital, information systems, faculty compensation, and program renewal,” the Moody’s report says.

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Boosting California's Postsecondary Education

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An excellent report, primarily authored by Patrick Callan, from The Council on Economic Development. The appendix, "Examples of Good Practices and Policy for Boosting Higher Education Productivity," is five pages of useful practice summaries from a number of other states.

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Are Ivy League Schools Really Offering the Best Architectural Education?

Are Ivy League Schools Really Offering the Best Architectural Education? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"What this shows is that there are two fundamentally different ways of teaching taking place in US architecture schools. On the one hand are the Ivy League schools, with a focus on design and theory; on the other are schools focusing on the practical aspects of construction and sustainability. Both types of architectural teaching are finding success, with Harvard being first overall for its Graduate program, and Cal Poly first overall for its Undergraduate program.


Should we be surprised that Ivy League schools are finding success in the traditionally ‘academic’ aspects of training, while a Polytechnic is leading in teaching technical expertise? Perhaps not. What is more intriguing is that while professionals are obviously highly appreciative of both styles of teaching, in the case of the Ivy League schools this admiration seems to be one way traffic."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Like most unhealthy relationships, correcting this problem will require compromises from both sides. The profession has to find a way to position itself closer to the Ivy League graduate’s conception of architecture, and Ivy League schools really ought to be educating students in a way that doesn’t leave them alienated by the realities of making buildings.


How might schools do this? The answer may lie in those “very nearly mutually exclusive” lists from earlier. The University of Southern California seems to be producing uniquely balanced architects, appearing on four of the five lists highlighted and six of the eight lists in total, with their undergraduate program ranked 7th overall. Sadly, the statistics can’t tell us exactly how they achieve this balance – but this university may be one to watch in the future.

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Turning Education Upside Down

Turning Education Upside Down | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
“Flipped schools,” where students watch video lessons at home and do “homework” in class, are showing early promise in improving learning.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

At Clintondale Higher School, north of Detroit, the entire curriculum was "flipped" three years ago; and they like the results:


This is the second and far more important shift that comes with flipped classrooms: it frees up class time for hands-on work. Students learn by doing and asking questions — school shouldn’t be a spectator sport. ”A lot of people think it just has to do with technology,” said Kim Spriggs, who teaches business and marketing. “It’s actually more time for kids to do higher-order thinking and hands-on projects. Instead of presenting the information in class and having students work on projects at home, where they don’t necessarily have support, here in class, one-on-one or in small groups, I can help them immediately.” Students can also help each other, a process that benefits both the advanced and less advanced learners.


Flipping also changes the distribution of teacher time. In a traditional class, the teacher engages with the students who ask questions — but it’s those who don’t ask who tend to need the most attention. “We refer to ‘silent failers,’ ” said Spriggs. “Now it’s a lot harder for students to hide. The teacher can see pretty much where every student’s understanding is and how to help them. It’s a huge difference for students who didn’t seek out extra help and attention — who just sit back and keep silent.”


Clintondale’s experience indicates that the biggest effect of flipping classrooms is on the students at the bottom. “It’s tough to fail a flipped class, because you’re doing the stuff in here,” said Rob Dameron, the head of the English department. “I used to have about a 30 percent failure rate in English – these kids come in a lot at third-grade, fourth-grade reading levels. Now, out of 130 kids, I have three who are failing — mostly due to attendance problems.”

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Indian Universities Still Lag in World Rankings

Indian Universities Still Lag in World Rankings | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The three ranking surveys use methodologies that emphasize academic research and faculty citation in journals, followed by other measures like employer reputation, academic reputation, faculty-student ratio, and the international composition of faculty and students. Indian universities lose out on many of these fronts. In addition to lack of research citations, they perform badly on other metrics like faculty-to-student ratios and lack of internationalism.


To be sure, there is a debate around rankings methodology and whether it is fair to rate Indian universities against older and richer Western institutions.


“India has domestic priorities to educate more young people,” said Phil Baty, editor of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. Still, he said, “there should be an elite group of institutions that focus on global competitiveness.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Intense: "Competition to get into elite state-run colleges is fierce. Last year, 512,000 applicants sought admission for 9,647 spots in the 15 technology institutes and the Indian School of Mines. Indian news media regularly report on the exorbitant percentages required of graduating high school students to gain a spot at state-run institutions like Delhi University or Bombay University, sometimes upward of 99 percent in certain colleges for degrees in commerce or technology."

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At the New School’s New Building, a Sign Isn’t Just a Sign

At the New School’s New Building, a Sign Isn’t Just a Sign | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The “wayfinding” system of signs and staircases at the New School’s University Center, opening early next year, is designed to do more than get people from one point to another.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

“This is more about orientation than specific information,” said Mr. Marshall, who joined Mr. Baur on a tour recently. “As you move into the building, there are room numbers and specificity.”


The lettering has a three-dimensional appearance that plays on perspective to point people in the right direction. It is as though someone were shining a flashlight above the letters, and once you understand the system, you can tell which way to go from the way the letters face.


The letters differ from floor to floor, although the typefaces are all variations on a single font: Irma, designed by Peter Bil’ak. The lettering on the top floor has a deep shadow. The lettering on the ground floor has almost none.


“The idea is to give a tool for a place, a typeface for a place,” Mr. Baur said. “It’s a language which can be adopted in different contexts.”

Mr. Baur said the biggest challenge was not the staircases or the signs, but the “donor wall” in the lobby, with the names of people who had contributed money for the building.


“We never do that in Europe,” he said.


[faciities planning, wayfinding, North Atlantic, NY]

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SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, George Brown College, Toronto

SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, George Brown College, Toronto | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This project is at George Brown College in Toronto. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

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Wallflowers at the Revolution: Evolving Faculty Perspectives on Online Education

Wallflowers at the Revolution: Evolving Faculty Perspectives on Online Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The 2013 Inside Higher Ed Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology, jointly administered by Inside Higher Ed and Gallup, is the second annual attempt to gauge academic opinion on technology and teaching. Often, faculty opinion is based on little direct experience or familiarity, or biased based on their own plunge into online learning. Regardless, the evolving subjective perceptions of e-learning are fascinating to see unfold. Even when experiences are anecdotal or uniformed, this survey shows how, in aggregate, educational technology is gradually becoming a fixture within academe. But not without its nagging controversies. We are in the midst of something between an evolution and a revolution—a modification of business-as-usual and a major transformation. These findings provide a snapshot of our changing times, which will likely look dated and even naive a few years from now.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A valuable analysis and perspective of the data from this survey. We like the first subhead: "Lack of familiarity breeds contempt." [

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Harvard Launches Deans' Design Challenge to Proactively Change Urban Life by 2030

Harvard Launches Deans' Design Challenge to Proactively Change Urban Life by 2030 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

An entrepreneurial dose of design will soon grace the Harvard Innovation Lab. The i-lab announced Friday the launch of the Deans' Design Challenge, a contest aimed at addressing the challenges facing the world's swiftly growing population.

Design will join the ranks of Harvard's pre-existing Deans' Challenges. One focuses on cultural entrepreneurship, while the other is centered around health and life sciences. Sponsored by 13 deans from schools across Harvard and hosted by the i-lab, the contests' goals have been for students to create cross-disciplinary teams they can tackle social and health issues head-on with.

Between the two competitions, students were awarded a total of $150,000 last semester.

The theme of the inaugural Deans' Design Challenge is "Urban Life 2030." Participants will be tasked with developing tools that will improve the livability of our cities. The world's urban population is estimated to grow by roughly 50 percent in the next 15 years, according to the i-lab, and largely in less developed regions where an influx of individuals could compound the effects of existing transportation, safety, food, water and inequality issues.

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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 26, 2013 12:28 PM

Interesting facts of Urban Life by the year

2030

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2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Bing Concert Hall, Stanford University

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Bing Concert Hall, Stanford University | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Responding to the Arcadian quality of the surrounding Stanford Arboretum, the site design brings landscape into the building, appearing more like a clearing in the woods than an urban building with hard edges. It is a critical element of the campus arts district. Architecture and landscape create a series of gathering spaces to the north, west and south, fully engaging the setting.


The jury said, “ . . . elegant proportions . . . nice fit in context of campus . . . well crafted, beautiful materials and simplicity . . .”


The central element is an 842-seat vineyard style concert hall and includes a studio/rehearsal hall, artists’ suites, a music library, instrument storage rooms designed to double as practice rooms, an artists’ lounge and generous public amenities.


The seating sections split into terraces ringing the stage and create an intimate concert experience for both audience and performer.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

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2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Superstition Mountain Campus, Central Arizona College

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Merit Award, Superstition Mountain Campus, Central Arizona College | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The jury said, “ . . . refreshing . . . outstanding systematic approach . . . sculptural building, wonderful gesture . . . ” new jewel box lays ground for future building sites . . .can change people lives . . . structure expressed in powerful way.”


College Center nearly doubled the square footage of the campus. The building layout was organized with two centers; one center defined by a large folded ceiling that spans open learning spaces with floor to ceiling glass; the second by a group of five science teaching labs with a technical focus. A bridge occupied by offices and lounges links the two centers and provides an academic link between functions.

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The application process for the society's 2014 awards is open now.

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2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, John Jay College of Law

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, John Jay College of Law | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The new building symbolizes John Jay’s evolu­tion, doubling the school’s interdisciplinary sciences, transforms the College into a 21st century research institution, and establishes a new identity and civic presence.


The jury said “ . . . great example of excellent university building in difficult dense urban context . . . solves multiple problems and creates new exciting college space in the city. . . . dynamic space . . . challenging site, made a huge impact . . .”


The 625,000-square-foot building integrates all functions of a traditional college campus into a single city block. A 500-foot-long stepped social cascade, initiating at the fifth floor cafeteria and descending four stories to the main student entrance, provides leisure space for social and academic interaction between students, faculty, and administrators.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This project is at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, an example of a vertical campus theme. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

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2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, Tulane University

2013 SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, Tulane University | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Tulane University was dealt a major blow by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, which caused more than $650 million damage to its downtown and uptown campuses. Just days before, equipment was positioned to drive piles for what is now known as Weatherhead Hall. The project went on hold while Tulane repaired damage and created a renewal plan. The university clarified its vision and accelerated plans for undergraduate living and learning.


Weatherhead functions as part of a main campus entry, and builds upon New Orleans vernacular that stems from a strong program model and massing.


The jury said “ . . . it is all about community and gathering space . . . successful . . . friendly . . . under­stated clean plan, good neighbor, and good design elements . . .if every residence did this, it would be great . . . ”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This faculty residence project is at Tulane University. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

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How One College Boosted Female STEM Graduates–Fast

How One College Boosted Female STEM Graduates–Fast | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The story of how Harvey Mudd College quadrupled its women computer-science graduates in just six years shows how quickly a concerted effort by one organization can shift the balance. 

Even though the 777-student college, which was named for the mining engineer who founded it in the 1950s, specializes in engineering, science, math and computer science, women computer-science majors in 2006 comprised a disappointing 10% of the graduating class.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Now: "Females now make up about 45% of the college’s computer science grads, a percentage that reflects the male-female balance on campus as a whole, and is quadruple the 2006 figure."

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new book— The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World: Howard Gardner, Katie Davis

The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World [Howard Gardner, Katie Davis] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.
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We're reading this.

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Rutgers University's Hurricane Sandy Report

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Much to learn in this report.“While there were many positive findings, the university knows there are always opportunities to learn and improve,” Keleman added.Most of the recommendations for improvement identified in the review have been implemented, including:refining response protocols;improving protection of information and communication infrastructure;identifying alternative work sites for staff in the event of relocation; andincreasing social media links on the campus status page.Other recommendations are in the process of being implemented, such as upgrading generator systems and increasing emergency supplies in residence halls and other locations on all campuses. Rutgers will continue to solicit input and support from the entire university community to further improve emergency management systems and practices.The report, which was developed largely for internal planning purposes, was thoroughly reviewed to ensure that advisory information and specifics of university security remained confidential, can be found here.

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Blog post comparing academe to a drug gang provokes much discussion

Scott Jaschick reviews a currently popular blog post that compares the behavior of newly minted PhDs to those who seek to join drug gangs.


Then [the blogger] turns to academe and finds very similar conditions. "The academic job market is structured in many respects like a drug gang, with an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core of insiders. Even if the probability that you might get shot in academia is relatively small (unless you mark student papers very harshly), one can observe similar dynamics," he writes. "Academia is only a somewhat extreme example of this trend, but it affects labor markets virtually everywhere....  Academic systems more or less everywhere rely at least to some extent on the existence of a supply of 'outsiders' ready to forgo wages and employment security in exchange for the prospect of uncertain security, prestige, freedom and reasonably high salaries that tenured positions entail."

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Here's the original blog post.

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Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

It’s been 30 years since I developed the notion of “multiple intelligences.” I have been gratified by the interest shown in this idea and the ways it’s been used in schools, museums, and businesses around the world. But one unanticipated consequence has driven me to distraction—and that’s the tendency of many people, including persons whom I cherish, to credit me with the notion of ‘learning styles’ or to collapse ‘multiple intelligences’ with ‘learning styles.’ It’s high time to relieve my pain and to set the record straight.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Gardner summarizes:


As an educator, I draw three primary lessons for educators:


1. Individualize your teaching as much as possible. Instead of “one size fits all,” learn as much as you can about each student, and teach each person in ways that they find comfortable and learn effectively. Of course this is easier to accomplish with smaller classes. But ‘apps’ make it possible to individualize for everyone.


2. Pluralize your teaching. Teach important materials in several ways, not just one (e.g. through stories, works of art, diagrams, role play). In this way you can reach students who learn in different ways. Also, by presenting materials in various ways, you convey what it means to understand something well. If you can only teach in one way, your own understanding is likely to be thin.


3. Drop the term “styles.” It will confuse others and it won’t help either you or your students.

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Julie Ekner Koch's curator insight, December 9, 2013 2:14 AM

Important points about individualized teaching

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Collaborative Book on Teaching with Technology

Collaborative Book on Teaching with Technology | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Nellie Deutsch
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Deutsch is looking for authors.

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Dr. Nellie Deutsch's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:32 AM

Learning has no borders when it comes to technology. Today, students and teachers can connect for learning 24/7. They no longer need to be in the same physical space. However, connecting face-to-face in realtime is very important to the learning process. Teaching in a Live Online Class can be very rewarding for the teacher and student. 
There are many benefits to the face-to-face real time online learning environment that require our attention. Teaching in a asynchronous non-time dependent learning platform is not enough for today’s student. Students need immediate gratifications.

Students need to have the opportunity to be with the instructor in real time, so they can get immediate response to their questions and not have to wait. They need to see the teacher in action. What is your opinion. 

Please fill in the form if you're interested in writing a chapter or chapters and collaborating on a book on teaching with technology and sharing your experiences. The first chapter/s draft is due on December 31, 2013. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YxzzlY_9l7dE7nNwV4ezWqRaVSzNBTmFXvzCddS_uCg/viewform

Dr. Nellie Deutsch's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:32 AM

Learning has no borders when it comes to technology. Today, students and teachers can connect for learning 24/7. They no longer need to be in the same physical space. However, connecting face-to-face in realtime is very important to the learning process. Teaching in a Live Online Class can be very rewarding for the teacher and student. 
There are many benefits to the face-to-face real time online learning environment that require our attention. Teaching in a asynchronous non-time dependent learning platform is not enough for today’s student. Students need immediate gratifications.

Students need to have the opportunity to be with the instructor in real time, so they can get immediate response to their questions and not have to wait. They need to see the teacher in action. What is your opinion. 

Please fill in the form if you're interested in writing a chapter or chapters and collaborating on a book on teaching with technology and sharing your experiences. The first chapter/s draft is due on December 31, 2013. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YxzzlY_9l7dE7nNwV4ezWqRaVSzNBTmFXvzCddS_uCg/viewform

Dr. Nellie Deutsch's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:33 AM

Learning has no borders when it comes to technology. Today, students and teachers can connect for learning 24/7. They no longer need to be in the same physical space. However, connecting face-to-face in realtime is very important to the learning process. Teaching in a Live Online Class can be very rewarding for the teacher and student. 
There are many benefits to the face-to-face real time online learning environment that require our attention. Teaching in a asynchronous non-time dependent learning platform is not enough for today’s student. Students need immediate gratifications.

Students need to have the opportunity to be with the instructor in real time, so they can get immediate response to their questions and not have to wait. They need to see the teacher in action. What is your opinion. 

Please fill in the form if you're interested in writing a chapter or chapters and collaborating on a book on teaching with technology and sharing your experiences. The first chapter/s draft is due on December 31, 2013. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YxzzlY_9l7dE7nNwV4ezWqRaVSzNBTmFXvzCddS_uCg/viewform

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New Study Says Open-Plan Offices Are Bad

New Study Says Open-Plan Offices Are Bad | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

[C]riticisms of the open-plan are legion. But Burkeman’s predictable diatribe was backed up by a new Harvard study that reached some fairly unhealthy conclusions about open-plan offices. The study, by researchers Jungsoo Kim and Richard de Dear, found that of the 42,700 office workers surveyed, nearly half of those in completely open-plan offices (sans partitions) complained about environmental noise levels. Even more surprising, cubicle workers—distinguished between those in offices with low and high partitions—were more greatly disatisfied with the noise around their workstations. 

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This is our shocked face /

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2013 SCUP Excellence in Landscape Architecture, Open Space Honor Award

2013 SCUP Excellence in Landscape Architecture, Open Space Honor Award | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Discovery Walk is a collaborative art project that speaks of the medical school’s identity and heritage. The story of the school and its famous individuals is told on 400 granite panels photo-etched with photographs, letters, and medical illustrations illuminating a dynamic history.


The jury said, “ . . . very transformative . . . huge commitment of institution . . . eloquently executed . . . elegant, simple solution . . .. still retains sense of individuality . . .”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
This project is at Stanford University. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now. #SCUPPA
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