SCUP Links
Follow
Find
111.0K views | +76 today
SCUP Links
Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Students Aren't Getting Enough Sleep—School Starts Too Early

Students Aren't Getting Enough Sleep—School Starts Too Early | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics says delaying the day may help teens get more rest.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Makes all the sense in the world that this carries on into college or university years. Does any university start its earliest classes at 9 am or later?

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Content Licensing Creates 'Existential Crisis' for Libraries

Content Licensing Creates 'Existential Crisis' for Libraries | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Old-fashioned media—books, tapes, CDs, etc.—are governed by the first-sale doctrine, a legal provision that allows a buyer to do whatever she wants with a copy.


The licensing of digital media, however, gives publishers far more power. Instead of selling an album outright, they can sell permission to access its contents for a fixed amount of time. (This is a boon for textbook publishers in particular. Under a digital regime, they may not have to worry about losing sales to students buying used copies.)


The licensing model stands to become the norm as physical media get phased out, says Mr. Hoek. “This isn’t just a music problem,” he says. Anything made of “ones and zeroes” can be kept on a leash.


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Even as SCUP takes a deep, hard look at how it licenses its knowledge content, that kind of deep, hard look by publishers is worrying college and university librarians:


As more and more books, videos, and sound recordings are licensed and distributed through online-only means, the amount of materials available for libraries to collect is shrinking.


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

New Perry Chapman Research Report: 'Developing Research Methods for Analyzing Learning Spaces That Can Inform Institutional Missions of Learning and Engagement'

New Perry Chapman Research Report: 'Developing Research Methods for Analyzing Learning Spaces That Can Inform Institutional Missions of Learning and Engagement' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Members of the Society for College and University Planning can access digital versions of this new research report on the report's main information page, http://www.scup.org/SM-2014PerryChapman. Nonmembers may view a complimentary ten-page excerpt there, or purchase the book there as well.


This new report, second in the series, addresses the larger context of the university campus and students’ perceptions and experiences of their learning at the tertiary level more generally. Rather than starting from environmental psychology or behaviorist models, it explores the value of applying contemporary approaches from the social sciences to learning space design, an approach increasingly being developed. This, however, is not just a matter of applying a different research method; it also concerns the underlying problem of how we conceptualize relationships between material space and its occupation both generally and specifically in relationship to learning. In fact, over the last few years, theorists across many disciplines that deal with material space—such as geography, anthropology, and science and technology studies—have been critically examining precisely this issue of rethinking how to conceptualize the interrelationships between space, people, artifacts, and activities.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

About the 2013–2014 Perry Chapman Prize Research Team


  • DR. JOS BOYS is currently an academic developer at the University of New South Wales, Sydney. Previously, she was a teaching fellow and director of student enhancement in the Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Sciences (FADSS) at Northumbria University.
  • DR. CLARE MELHUISH is an anthropologist of architecture and the built environment based in London. She has employed ethnographic research methods to explore processes of architectural design work and the impacts and social experience of built form in various different settings. She is currently research associate in the Urban Lab, University College London
  • ANGELINA WILSON is currently undertaking a Ph.D. at Northumbria University, United Kingdom. Her research examines how students from different disciplines work together in a mixed-disciplinary environment and the effect this has on both individual and group learning.
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Q&A with Richard Ekman on Challenges, Misconceptions Facing Independent Colleges

Q&A with Richard Ekman on Challenges, Misconceptions Facing Independent Colleges | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Ekman: Because they are more nimble than bigger, more bureaucratic institutions, small colleges can both preserve their essential elements and be responsive to change. Remember that the model of the small college has a track record of real success, and it would be foolish to discard it simply to go along with the latest fads. By most measures, small colleges do better than other types of institutions."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"In this installment, DiSalvio interviews Richard Ekman, president of the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC), an association of more than 600 private colleges and universities with members including selective liberal arts colleges, medium-sized independent universities, religious colleges, historically black colleges and single-sex institutions."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Higher Ed Consultants' Best Case Scenarios Rarely Reality, Seen as Necessary

"According to the new research, colleges reported saving only 2 percent on average so far. That might increase to 2.2 percent when all is said and done, though, because of cuts the colleges are still making. That's pretty close to the low-end "base case" of savings consultants gave colleges, of 2.6 percent in savings, but a long way from the best-case scenario of 4 percent.while colleges may enjoy working with consultants to diagnose their problems, the consultants’ recommendations end up being fairly similar. ...


'There’s a playbook, so to speak, for this,' he said.


Still, he did not find a college that lost money using a consultant, only colleges that saved much less than the best-case scenario."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

And : "[C]olleges in the study felt they needed consultants, and some of the projects they worked on required hundreds if not thousands of people. So they might not have been able to achieve much or any savings without the aid of consultants."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Exploring Vocation: Reframing Undergraduate Education as a Quest for Purpose

Exploring Vocation: Reframing Undergraduate Education as a Quest for Purpose | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In sum, reflection on vocation taking place in a community of shared interest and support shifted the framing of higher education for both students and faculty. The three elements of the PTEV programs—vocational narrative as basic structure, the grounding of this narrative in learning communities, and the cultivation of reflective practices—invited students to experience their college education not as passive consumers but as protagonists in a serious enterprise with life-long consequences. These programs demonstrated that it is possible to recover the formative power of liberal education, even at a time when fixation upon its merely instrumental value threatens to overwhelm the deeper and more public ends of higher education."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

For 10 years the Lilly Endowment resourced a Program on the Theological Exploration of Vocation (PTEV) that appears to have strengthened liberal education on their campuses: 


"[T]his project challenged a group of 88 colleges and universities affiliated with a variety of Christian denominations, from Orthodox and Roman Catholic to Evangelical Protestant and Quaker, to think anew about what they were trying to achieve for their students (for a list of the campuses that participated, as well as articles discussing the PTEV, see the Lilly Endowment website at www.resourcingChristianity.org). The theme of life purpose, or 'vocation' in the language the project drew from the religious language of calling."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Learning-Centric Data Scientists to Take Over Higher Ed

"Instructional designers were yesterday’s hot new member of the course development team. Today, the must-have course development team member (along with faculty and instructional designers and media specialist and librarians) is the data scientist.

And not just any data scientist.  A data scientist who is also an expert in program assessment.  A data scientist who is also a learning geek, steeped in all things Bloom and constructivist.

Maybe these learning-centric data scientists have always been wandering around campus.  Hanging out with the good people in Institutional Research, ensconced over at the Ed School.

From here on out the learning-focused data scientists are the new superstars.  The cool kids.  The big women and men on campus."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Well, not really. But they are one symptom of drastically changing times. "This is a shift away from the model of a solo professor creating / delivering / evaluating each course to a team-based and data-centric teaching model."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Society for College and University Planning Names First President, Michael D. Moss

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is a new position and part of significant repositioning for SCUP's next fifty years..

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Natural light in office boosts health

Natural light in office boosts health | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Office workers with more natural light exposure at the office had longer sleep duration, better sleep quality, more physical activity and better quality of life compared to office workers with less light exposure in the workplace, a study shows. "There is increasing evidence that exposure to light, during the day, particularly in the morning, is beneficial to your health via its effects on mood, alertness and metabolism," said the senior study author.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

How about students? "Employees with windows in the workplace ... slept an average of 46 minutes more per night than employees who did not have the natural light exposure in the workplace. There also was a trend for workers in offices with windows to have more physical activity than those without windows."

more...
OHS OHS's curator insight, August 22, 4:13 AM

OHS isn't just about staying safe it also means staying healthy. As Jon works in an office environment Natural Light isn't always guaranteed. Jon has assured me that majority of his light between normal 9-5 working hours is in fact natural light.

 

Scoop.it!

Trends— Why Not a Three-Day Work Week?

Trends— Why Not a Three-Day Work Week? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

One of the world's richest men, Carlos Slim, recently "proposed that the standard work schedule worldwide should be trimmed to three days a week. The current arrangement, he pointed out, was developed when life expectancy was lower and the world was, as a whole, poorer. Now, with people living longer and the structure of society shifting accordingly, a four-day weekend would improve quality of life, promote the development of other occupations, and healthier and more productive employees. Slim’s proposal included two important caveats: employees would work longer hours each day, and would continue to work into their seventies. (At Slim’s own company, Telmex, he is allowing workers past retirement age to keep working four-day weeks, at full salary.)"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Something's got to give. There aren't enough jobs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Change Magazine - May-June 2014

Change Magazine - May-June 2014 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In Short

  • An institutional commitment to preventive law helps create a positive campus culture by avoiding the need for formal legalistic procedures.

  • To promote an environment where people resolve disputes amicably, higher education attorneys must be problem solvers, critical thinkers, consensus builders, and patient risk managers.

  • Attorneys who can combine these skills with a healthy sense of humor will have one of the most interesting, engaging, rewarding professions ever."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

What College Can't Do & What Cartoons Can Do

What College Can't Do & What Cartoons Can Do | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"I just finished a fascinating blog post by Joshua Rothman called “What College Can’t Do.” There are so many insightful points in the essay that it wouldn’t make sense for me to cite just a quote or two. That wouldn’t do the piece justice. So I’ve decided to quote the whole damn thing instead. What follows is all Rothman except… well, I’ll let you figure that out."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Robert Mankoff using New Yorker cartoons to illustrate a brief essay by Joshua Rothman. A very nice way to spend some weekend leisure time. From a portion of the essay: 


"The presence of those old buildings can make you unreasonably optimistic; maybe modernity, like modernism, is just a historical period, a style. On the whole, though, the campus itself suggests the opposite: that modernity is an epoch—huge, dramatic, and irresistible—and that it is transforming the university."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

'Making the City of Lowell Downtown a College Town Is My Number-One Priority,' Says City Manager

'Making the City of Lowell Downtown a College Town Is My Number-One Priority,' Says City Manager | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"By traveling to Boston College football games across the country, City Manager Kevin Murphy, a BC alum, said he has seen true college towns like Clemson, S.C., that have plenty of businesses targeted at students.


When he looks at Lowell, Murphy said he sees something very different from a college town, but he is already working with local higher-education officials and others to try to change that.


'Making the city of Lowell downtown a college town is my number-one priority,' Murphy said in a recent meeting with The Sun's editorial board. 'That is paramount.'"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Who's going to help him plan that? [na]

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Predictive Patterns— 'Don't try using data as a weapon in organizational conflict'

Predictive Patterns— 'Don't try using data as a weapon in organizational conflict' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Regardless of how you define it, big data is transforming the way colleges and universities are being managed—and this trend is just in its infancy. Improving student success, identifying new sources of public support, increasing alumni giving, and reducing energy consumption are but a few of the opportunities waiting to be uncovered by data.


As you proceed, a word of caution: Don't try using data as a weapon in organizational conflict, Carleton's Rogers warns. 'This should be a collaborative effort where we're all working to get information because we care about the results,' he says. 'We have to create an environment where everyone is open to honest introspection and evaluation. The data might be positive—or not—but it's not personal.  It's intended to help the institution.'"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Several useful mini-case studies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

external higher ed trend of interest | The New Editors of the Internet

external higher ed trend of interest | The New Editors of the Internet | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In a small number of Silicon Valley conference rooms, decisions are being made about what people should and shouldn't see online—without the accountability or culture that has long accompanied that responsibility.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

How does this affect higher ed?

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Wood-clad University of Tokyo research building explores world of 'ubiquitous computing'

Wood-clad University of Tokyo research building explores world of 'ubiquitous computing' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

“'My goal was the unification of computers and architecture with nature,' said the 59-year-old Kuma.


The research building has three floors above ground and two basement levels. The entire interior is seeded with hundreds of sensors. The advanced sensor network system is sensitive to temperature, humidity, the flow of particles in the air and the presence of people.


Ken Sakamura, professor of information science at the University of Tokyo, was in charge of producing the Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building project.


“(The ubiquitous networking) technology will be effective in serving our aging society (by allowing people to operate various household tools and equipment without having to move about)," Sakamura said. “And now we can experiment with new ideas right away, using this building.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Dear Committee Members: A novel containing only faculty letters of recommendation?

Dear Committee Members: A novel

~ Julie Schumacher (author) More about this product
List Price: $22.95
Price: $15.49
You Save: $7.46 (33%)

From a review in Inside Higher Ed: "'It's a difficult time in higher education,' Schumacher said, 'and I hope the book points that out in a way that's not painfully moralistic.'


Far from it: from the satirical perspective of the aggrieved Fitger, Schumacher delineates very real problems and renders them hilarious without trivializing their human impact. Readers who are themselves tasked with writing entirely too many letters of recommendation may well wish they could write some like Fitger's; failing that, they are likely to enjoy reading his."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"By the novel's end, no solutions have been offered nor any problems solved."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Complete this sentence: Restaurants are to food trucks as colleges are to __________

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Are to what? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The Unanswered Question: How Will We Pay for Aggressive Higher Ed Attainment Goals?

The Unanswered Question: How Will We Pay for Aggressive Higher Ed Attainment Goals? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Certainly there are limitations to the model described, some of which I have identified and others which I'm sure readers will point out. It is currently being modified to eliminate some of its shortcomings.


But as flawed as it may be, it serves to point out several key points. First, different approaches to attaining goals have different cost consequences.


Second, in almost all scenarios, resources required by community colleges outstrip those that will be required by four-year institutions. This is a direct contradiction to priorities typically assigned in the appropriation process. Institutional costs can be reduced under an assumption of marginal costs being less than average costs, but this doesn't change the need to assign priority to funding for those institutions that will have to do the heavy lifting if attainment goals are to be met.


Third, the largest component of costs in both scenarios is student financial aid. The real-world examples reinforce the point made earlier in this paper that concentrated attention to the design of financial-aid programs is perhaps the key element in the development of cost-effective means of reaching aggressive attainment goals.


Finally, it drives home the point that reaching such goals will take substantial additional resources. Ways can be found to mitigate these costs, but success will be impossible without additional state investments."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"Dennis Jones, [a frequent SCUP presenter,] is president of NCHEMS, a nonprofit research-and-development center founded to improve strategic decision making in institutions and agencies of higher education. Jones is widely recognized for his work in such areas as developing public agendas to guide higher-education policymaking; financing, budgeting, and resource allocation; linking higher education with states' workforce and economic-development needs; and developing information to inform policymaking.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

A Century of Campus Planning: Past, Present, and Future —complimentary download from 'Planning for Higher Education'

A Century of Campus Planning: Past, Present, and Future —complimentary download from 'Planning for Higher Education' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
  1. This article was previously published in Facilities Manager magazine as part of APPA's 100th anniversary celebration. 
  2. It is shared here [pdf], for those who are not SCUP members, only through Sunday, August 24.
  3. Share your memories of the last 50 years of higher education planning on SCUP's 50th anniversary page.


"For most of its history, higher education in America was an experience that only the elite could enjoy. As a result, throughout the 19th century, higher education institutions became increasingly steeped in tradition and resistant to change. Things stayed about the same until World War II, which forced colleges and universities to face some huge challenges. For example, in 1944 the G.I. Bill enabled more than two million returning veterans to enter the higher education system.


'Higher education became more accessible and was no longer entirely the domain of the elite or the upper echelon,' says Persis C. Rickes, president and principal with Rickes Associates, a higher education planning firm in Attleboro, Massachusetts. 'Instead, it became the golden ticket to achieving the American Dream.' The nation’s higher education system was greatly challenged by this surge of students—in response, many institutions expanded facilities quickly, cheaply, and with minimal planning. ...


Going forward, most experts agree the pace of change will accelerate dramatically. Financial challenges, both capital and operational, will be the key drivers of facility planning in the future.


'Alternatives to the traditional higher education pipeline, such as badges and "unbundling," will lead to a reconceptualization of what it means to obtain a degree,' notes Rickes. 'While the residential collegiate experience will remain viable for some institutions, many others will be challenged to explore ways to reposition themselves in order to remain competitive, doing more with less.'”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
MILESTONES IN CAMPUS AND FACILITIES PLANNING

1860s: Morrill Act of 1862 (Land-Grant School Act)

1890s: Columbian Exposition (showed America how beautiful and functional a planned campus can be)

1940s: World War II and the G.I. Bill

1940s–1950s: Colorado and California create space guidelines in an attempt to control and optimize campus space

1950s: Creation of the Western Interstate Commission of Higher Education (WICHE)

1950s: Brown vs. Board of Education eliminated segregated educational institutions

1960s: Richard P. Dober published his landmark book, Campus Planning

1960s: Higher Education Act of 1964 (created more access to higher education)

1970s–present: Widespread use of cars on campus (traffic and parking have enormous impacts on the campus environment)

1990s–present: Widespread adoption of the Internet and distance learning

more...
Gregory A. Smith's curator insight, August 20, 11:34 AM

This article provides a bird's eye view of factors have impacted college and university planning over the past century.

Scoop.it!

Ex-Googler Creates Slick Kit to Turn Your Kid’s iPad Into a Teacher

Ex-Googler Creates Slick Kit to Turn Your Kid’s iPad Into a Teacher | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Many parents lament the amount of time their children spend glued to iPads, but instead of reaching for the parental controls, ex-Google engineer Pramod Sharma figured out how to harness its addictive powers as an educational tool. The result, called Osmo, uses the iPad’s cameras and display to turn any kitchen table into an interactive learning lab. ... Osmo uses letter tiles, colored blocks, random dinosaur action figures, and even a kid’s stick figure drawings as video game controllers when placed in the camera’s field of view. Osmo’s sophisticated vision systems recognizes the objects and uses them to trigger animations and effects on screen. Now, with over a million dollars in pre-orders, Osmo is on its way to market just in time for the Christmas season and Sharma is sharing background on the design process."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

So, just how are we planning for higher education? What will "higher ed" look like when these kids turn 18 in, what, 2028? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

MIT Wristband Could Make AC Obsolete?

MIT Wristband Could Make AC Obsolete? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A team of students at MIT is working on a prototype wearable that asks one important question: Why heat or cool a building when you could heat or cool a person?
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Good question. This is especially promising for attending professional conferences. But, seriously, what if individuals could control their own perceptions of being hot or cold, with mush less regard to the microenvironment they are in? How would this change AEC? Design? Learning?

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

New Law Requires Public Colleges to Extend Tuition Breaks to Veterans

New Law Requires Public Colleges to Extend Tuition Breaks to Veterans | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"[T]he Veterans' Access to Care Through Choice, Accountability, and Transparency Act of 2014 (HR 3230) requires [public] institutions to charge in-state tuition to veterans—regardless of how long they have lived in the state—within three years of the veterans’ discharge from active duty. Some dependents of veterans would also be eligible for the resident rates. Universities that do not offer the reduced rates could become ineligible to receive federal veteran-education dollars."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

But ... "Some public colleges say the new law will force institutions to shoulder an expensive burden. In June the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities implored Congress to let public institutions set their own prices, calling the tuition measure 'essentially an allocation of state, not federal, resources.'"

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

The feds tried to rate colleges in 1911. It was a disaster.

The feds tried to rate colleges in 1911. It was a disaster. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"At the turn of the 20th century, college was for the elite. Less than 3 percent of the US population had a bachelor's degree in 1910; just 14 percent had even finished high school.


Still, the number of colleges in the US had nearly doubled in the previous 50 years.And the new Association of American Universities was confronting a pressing question, according to David Webster, whowrote in 1984 about the early federal rating system in the History of Education Quarterly: When students applied to graduate school, how could universities know how good their undergraduate education was?


So the association did something that would be unthinkable in higher education today. It asked the federal government to step in.

The US Bureau of Education's top higher education official, Kendric Babcock, a former college president, agreed to tackle the question. Babcock thought he could create a rating system for more than 600 colleges that could judge "exactly the worth of the degrees granted by the widely varying institutions in the United States" and be accepted both in the US and abroad as an indicator of quality.


This turned out to be wildly optimistic."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"The uproar made it all the way to President William Howard Taft, who issued an executive order banning the distribution of the ratings developed by his own federal agency. The next president, Woodrow Wilson, who had spent much of his life in academia, let Taft's order stand despite pressure from the Association of American Universities to rescind it."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Location, Location, Location. Urban Hot Spots Are the Place to Be [for campuses]

Location, Location, Location.  Urban Hot Spots Are the Place to Be [for campuses] | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

#scup49 plenary speaker Jeff Selingo's latest in The Chronicle of Higher Education: "Unlike homeowners, colleges looking for a better neighborhood can’t simply hang up a "For Sale" sign and move on. Such colleges need to work harder to provide amenities and out-of-the-classroom opportunities for their students. Some colleges are trying to take on the role of a chamber of commerce, revitalizing abandoned properties nearby and helping to cultivate start-ups. Such efforts, though, are often beyond the expertise of campus officials and carry large price tags without an obvious or quick return on the investment."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Hundreds of campuses lose potential students to those in more desirable locations. Since it's really hard to pick up a campus (think American University in Cairo) and move it, Selingo suggests growing the trend to stepping across campus edges and making the neghborhood/city a more attractive one.

more...
No comment yet.