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SCUP Links
Members of the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) scan higher education, inside and out, and present this curated collection of links, articles, and resources. www.scup.org
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Meet president Obama’s favorite college leader

Meet president Obama’s favorite college leader | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The next time President Obama touts a new higher education plan, look around. You’ll likely find Nancy L. Zimpher in the background. Zimpher, the chancellor of the State University of New York system, has become the White House’s go-to college president. The love reached new heights Thursday, when Zimpher was picked from nearly 100 college...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

In the quote below, Zimpher speaks of how SUNY can take things to scale. In fact, SCUP is helping a SUNY prototype for sharing knowledge about innovative learning environments grow to scale: FLEXspace.


She’s a valuable ally. The SUNY system is both enormous — a 64-campus behemoth that runs the gamut from community colleges to top research universities — and relatively centralized. Buy-in from Zimpher is the equivalent of reaching dozens of colleges and hundreds of thousands of students.


“We’re so big, if we get good ideas, we’re the kind of place that can really take it to scale,” Zimpher said in an interview Thursday night.

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College Is Not a Playground

College Is Not a Playground | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

College in media is regularly portrayed as an island of self-exploration and opportunity, from the gross appetite of Animal House's frat scene to the brainy riches to more riches tale of The Social Network. In reality, the experience of college as playground is restricted. Fully 44 percent of those who attend post-secondary school go not to Middleton or the like, but to a community college. Those who do attend elite universities are shockingly wealthy; at Harvard, 45.6 percent of undergraduates come from families with income over $200,000, putting them in the top 3.8 percent of households in the U.S.


Toward the beginning of the film, Audrey and her mom are doing a crossword puzzle which asks for a synonym for "feckless." The word then comes up again and again, a jokey advanced vocab college term. It's a description of George and Edith, obviously, who are indulging in a flirtation that is a betrayal of their spouses and their children. But it's also a description of college itself, which is portrayed as an oasis of irresponsibility in which the well-to-do reproduce their own privileged fecklessness. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting perspective on higher ed.

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Who Will Reach College Age in the Next 14 Years?

Who Will Reach College Age in the Next 14 Years? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
An Interactive tool.As the U.S. population changes, so, too, will the makeup of American colleges and universities. In the coming years, they can expect to see significant changes in the demographics of their student bodies—and the regions from which students will hail.

This tool highlights those changes, from the national level down to within the more than 3,000 counties in the U.S. See the key takeaways for every county, the trends in changing demographics, population densities, and search for areas with specific demographic attributes. (Related articles: Colleges, Here Is Your Future | Changing Times, Tough Choices)

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Balthazar Acevedo's curator insight, February 4, 6:02 PM

The current underdevelopment and enfranchisement of the Texas Mexican American population, "Tejanos, " will result in one of the unprepared and highly illiterate population in the Western Hemphispher in the 21st century.  This population now comprises the majority of enrollment in public schools in Texas but has one of the lowest participation rates in terms of outcomes: literacy, numeracy, social literacy, techno-literacy, reading and writing comprehension and graduation with college ready skills. It also has one of the highest attrition rates of any ethnic group in America with 38% dropping out before they graduate.

 

Texas is investing much in expanding higher education institutions but that is not the corresponding case in terms of funding for public schools.  This inbalance will create a situation where there will be a diminishing return on investment as fewer Mexican Americans will be capable of attending these colleges and universities.

 

The research that I am currently conducting is directed at understanding how Tejanos must be prepared to assume competitive leadership roles, either elected or appointed, in elected or appointed offices so that can have a say-so in how policy is brokered and resources allocated to expand the capacity of this most endangered ethnic population.

 

 

 

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The Future of Higher Education Infographic

The Future of Higher Education Infographic | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The Future of Higher Education Infographic takes a look at the paths that higher education could take in the next few years.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

An interesting visual.

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'I feel like I was set up to fail'—

'I feel like I was set up to fail'— | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Some schools feast on federal aid and don't care if the student can repay it. Here's one woman's tragic story
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Like many others, Jaqueta had an important asset: She was eligible for a federal student loan. It is impossible to talk about for-profit education without mentioning how the availability of federal loans affects the process.


The lack of wealth among many students in their classrooms means that a higher share can qualify for need-based student aid. More than 60 percent of students at for-profits receive need-based Pell Grants. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, says that 96 percent took out student loans — twice as often as was the case with students in traditional four-year public institutions and more than seven times the rate of students at community colleges.


Those numbers are not an accident.

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Architecture and the Third Industrial Revolution

Architecture and the Third Industrial Revolution | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Ready for the next revolution? The profession changed dramatically thanks to mechanization and mass production, and the next massive shift will be no less disruptive. In this era of small-scale, bottom-up design, say hello to 3D-printed houses, digicities, and curriculums that teach future architects about far more than just building.

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Essay on the need for administrators and faculty to discuss risk | Inside Higher Ed

Essay on the need for administrators and faculty to discuss risk | Inside Higher Ed | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

About a year ago I was paging through a report prepared for our college by a group of leading risk-management consultants. Illustrated with brightly colored heat maps and tables, the report’s conclusions looked fairly reasonable.  But then I reached a chart titled “Reputation Risk.” Tucked among the factors that contribute to reputation, listed only after “branding” and “community relations,” was the phrase “academic excellence.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This!


Corporate jargon may help explain why campuswide awareness of risk has not fully taken hold at many academic institutions. Deans, presidents, and faculty leaders can find the framework of Enterprise Risk Management, commonly known as ERM, alienating. The talk of suppliers, products, deliverables, and profits is not our language.

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'Ghost buildings' to help public envisage impact of developments

'Ghost buildings' to help public envisage impact of developments | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Oxford to pilot scheme to outline shape of structures with poles before granting of planning permission
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

On campus?

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Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Notes? – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Notes? – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

“I can’t read my own handwriting,” the young woman explained. “It’s best if I take a picture of your writing so I can understand the notes.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Taking a picture does indeed record the information, but it omits some of the necessary mental engagement that taking notes employs. So can the two be equally effective?


The answer to that question is difficult to gauge, and short of hooking up students to electrodes and monitoring their brain waves as they take pictures or write notes, I’m not sure how to measure the neurological efficacy of either method. For now, I allow students to take notes however they see fit—handwritten, typed, voice-recorded, or photographed—because I figure that some notes, no matter the method of documentation, are better than none.

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Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All

Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Hampton found that, rather than isolating people, technology made them more connected. “It turns out the wired folk — they recognized like three times as many of their neighbors when asked,” Hampton said. Not only that, he said, they spoke with neighbors on the phone five times as often and attended more community events. Altogether, they were much more successful at addressing local problems, like speeding cars and a small spate of burglaries.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting.

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Webinar— Exploring common spaces

Webinar— Exploring common spaces | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

On Tuesday, January 21 (3:30 - 5:00 p.m.) , the Learning Spaces Collaboratory presents the first in series of four webinars focusing on the campus as an ecosystem of learning spaces--beginning with attention to common spaces, defined as spaces that are agile and flexible enough to accommodate learners in groups large and small, before, after, and sometimes during scheduled class periods; those welcoming and transparent enough to shape a community of learners; spaces giving students authority to own their learning, their spaces for learning.   

 
Questions to be addressed:  What role do common spaces have in the ecosystem of learning spaces?  What role do they play in nurturing robust learning communities? What is a "common" space intended to do, to be [what is their job description]? What impact do such spaces have on 21st century learners?  How do we know?

The webinar will be moderated by Jeanne L. Narum (LSC) and facilitated by:
  • Meredith Bostwick-Lorenzo Eiroa, Associate Director – Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP
  • Kent Duffy, Principal - SRG Partnership, Inc.
  • Keith Sawyer, Morgan Distinguished Professor in Educational Innovations - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Susan Whitmer, Research Lead, Education – Herman Miller
  • Joe M. Williams, Director of Public Services, University Library – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Cathy M. Wolfe, Director of Campus Planning – George Mason University
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Also from the LSC, its new guide (pdf, free) is a must-download for SCUPers and anyone else with an interest in learning environments: Planning for Assessing 21st Century Spaces for 21st Century Learners.

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Trend— Tying college and university president compensation to performance measures

Trend— Tying college and university president compensation to performance measures | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The landscape of higher ed reveals a trend toward higher ed executive, especially presidential, bonuses tied to measures of performance such as cost savings, growth in research grants, fundraising, graduation rates and more. This resource examines that trend using, as a case study, John O’Donnell, president of Massachusetts Bay Community College.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
A recent and related SCUP member resource is “Succession Planning: The Key to Ensuring Leadership” (members: direct-download download pdf now; nonmembers: Get the report here)Tags: Presidents, Leadership, Resource and Budget Planning, CompensationPatrick Callan of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The process appears to be undertaken “just to justify extravagant salaries, or is way too focused on fundraising. “In other cases, ‘it’s like they put the presidents on trial,’ and every constituency — faculty, donors, students — is invited to weigh in. That’s just a killer. It creates presidents who won’t take risks.’”Dennis P. Jones of the National Center for Higher Education Management (NCHEMS), a frequent SCUP speaker: “It all goes to the idea of putting money behind the goals you’re trying to achieve. If that’s more graduates, let’s pay for graduates. If it’s something else, let’s pay for that.”Stephen Pollack of the consulting firm Mercer: “Corporate concepts are just starting to drift into academia, and they have to. Institutions can’t afford not to have competent people in these jobs.”From Community College Daily www.ccdaily.com by Rebecca Trounson/Hechinger Report.
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Trend— Integrated and complicated inter-institutional and inter-agency planning

Trend— Integrated and complicated inter-institutional and inter-agency planning | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Far western Kentucky needed an engineering education to fulfill demand and attract business. Fifteen years of planning and implementation led to success: “This is a very unique operation. It’s probably the only place in the United States where there’s a tripartite arrangement between a community college, a university and a flagship university that delivers engineering education. People were skeptical that it could be done, but I was convinced it would work because of the level of commitment here.”
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
Tags: Collaboration, Integrated Planning, Change Management, Partnering, Regional Development, Community CollegesWilliam Murphy, founding director of the UK College of Engineering at the Paducah campus: “‘Sometimes people just have geographic limitations and we have to take the education to them. I think many of those nearly 200 graduates we have had fall into that category,’ he said. ‘We have tried to turn all of them into successful engineers, because there’s always a position out there that they can be successful in.’”“In addition to determining how the program would be offered in Paducah, officials needed a place to house the program, which meant building a new facility on the community college campus. More than $8.4 million was raised—entirely through private donations in Paducah—for the construction of a 53,000-square-foot science and engineering building on the WKCTC campus. The faculty and staff from UK, MSU and WKCTC share offices and classroom space in the three-story building.”There are “more than 170 students currently enrolled in Paducah’s engineering program, said David Silverstein, director of the UK College of Engineering Paducah campus. As important as the program has been to the region, it has been just as important to the individual graduates, he said. About 75 percent of the nearly 200 graduates of the program have found engineering jobs in their communities.”
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1975 Was 'the End of Higher Education’s Golden Age' -Clay Shirky

1975 Was 'the End of Higher Education’s Golden Age' -Clay Shirky | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

For 30 wonderful years, we had been unusually flush, and we got used to it, re-designing our institutions to assume unending increases in subsidized demand. This did not happen. The year it started not happening was 1975. Every year since, we tweaked our finances, hiking tuition a bit, taking in a few more students, making large lectures a little larger, hiring a few more adjuncts.


Each of these changes looked small and reversible at the time. Over the decades, though, we’ve behaved like an embezzler who starts by taking only what he means to replace, but ends up extracting so much that embezzlement becomes the system. There is no longer enough income to support a full-time faculty and provide students a reasonably priced education of acceptable quality at most colleges or universities in this country.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Is he correct? "Our current difficulties are not the result of current problems. They are the bill coming due for 40 years of trying to preserve a set of practices that have outlived the economics that made them possible."

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Thomas Carlson-Reddig's curator insight, February 10, 2:45 PM

The expectations of college students and parents have also factored into the faciltiries that are being provided. Universities that fail to improve their campuses and offer amenities and the kinds of learning environments now expected on college campuses are in even greater danger.

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The hottest RFQ in CA— Stunning Site and Stunning Shortlist at UC Santa Cruz

The hottest RFQ in CA— Stunning Site and Stunning Shortlist at UC Santa Cruz | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

“The desire to have something like this has been around for a very long time, but it came into focus in the last couple of years,” said Weber. The Institute’s museum will contain interactive exhibits on topics ranging from climate change to cancer research, and the facility as a whole, measuring 27,000-31,000 square feet, will contain research and teaching facilities, seminar and conference spaces, study areas, a cafe, and more. “The vision is to engage the issues of our time through the arts, sciences,  humanities and technology based on research here at UC Santa Cruz and bringing in material that complements and pushes what’s going on here,” said Weber.


The  site, he added, is “really spectacular,” wedged between a forest of Redwoods and Ancient Oaks above and a grand meadow overlooking the Pacific below.  There will be a public presentation of the final three teams’ schemes on April 3 at UCSC. The $32-40 million project’s completion date will depend on ongoing fundraising, added Weber.

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Study finds impact of attending poor high school follows one to college

The study, released today by the National Bureau of Economic Research, examines the college grades of students admitted to the University of Texas at Austin through the "10 percent program" in which the top students at every Texas high school have been guaranteed admission (although the percentage has been reduced somewhat since the plan was created).


The study (abstract available here) found that the quality of high school is a key predictor of grades in college, not only in freshman year, but continuing into the sophomore and junior years as well.

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New Report Documents Professional Success of Liberal Arts Graduates

New Report Documents Professional Success of Liberal Arts Graduates | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

How Liberal Arts and Sciences Majors Fare in Employment: A Report on Earnings and Long-Term Career Paths

By Debra Humphreys and Patrick Kelly

Student, parents, and policy makers interested in the "return on investment" of college education tend to place unwarranted emphasis on the choice of undergraduate major, often assuming that a major in a liberal arts field has a negative effect on employment prospects and earnings potential. This new report—which includes data on earnings, employment rates, graduate school earnings bumps, and commonly chosen professions—presents clear evidence to the contrary. It shows not only that the college degree remains a sound investment, especially in these difficult economic times, but also that—as compared to students who major in professional, preprofessional, or STEM fields—liberal arts majors fare very well in terms of both earnings and long-term career success.


Order your print copy today.


Also available for purchase in eBook Version (PDF).

Read an excerpt of this publication online.

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USF's science center's new digs go sleekly underground

USF's science center's new digs go sleekly underground | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

What the final product also does, with absolute success, is add multilayered urbanity to a corner of the campus that in the past was more awkward than alluring.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We guess the critic likes it:


This isn't the first educational building in the city that digs down to open up possibilities: Pfau Long Architecture did so in an even more dynamic way at Lick-Wilmerding High School a decade ago. Lo Schiavo Center shows that it can be done in a large-scale way. What seems like a loss - the removal of a knoll and existing plaza - in fact can be a gain.


In and of itself, Lo Schiavo Center is a refined work of architecture. It's even better as part of something larger, and that's the standard by which all urban buildings should be judged.

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Illuminating the rare manuscripts at Penn— A modern rare-book room

Illuminating the rare manuscripts at Penn— A modern rare-book room | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Step off the elevator into the University of Pennsylvania's hallowed rare-book room at the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, and you immediately recognize something is different. Where's the wood? Van Pelt...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Step off the elevator into the University of Pennsylvania's hallowed rare-book room at the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, and you immediately recognize something is different. Where's the wood?


Van Pelt is notorious for being one of Philadelphia's harsher examples of '60s-era Brutalist architecture, with walls made of bare concrete block and prison-size windows, and yet its rare-book room was always decorated as though it were part of some English manor house. Deeply carved, 16th-century oak paneling greeted visitors in the entryway. Dim and a little dusty, the mood was a cross between a Borgesian labyrinth and Dumbledore's attic. You were never sure what might lurk around the dark corners.


So when the elevator slides open now, it is a surprise to confront a shimmering glass screen, etched like crystal. Bright sunshine beams around the space. To the right, a glassed-in porch beckons. Arranged with elegant modern seating, it could be a swank condo lobby, except that it is filled with students sprawled on the sofas with their laptops.


Forget that stuffy collegiate style of yore. This is what a rare-book library looks like circa 2014.

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At a small private college, all-night dining allows for more flexible class scheduling

At a small private college, all-night dining allows for more flexible class scheduling | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

At Lynn University, one of the first small colleges to offer a 24-hour cafeteria, students are more nourished and classes are more flexible.

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Building a University, Part 1 (UCLA & UCSD): How 5 California Schools Approach Campus Design

Building a University, Part 1 (UCLA & UCSD): How 5 California Schools Approach Campus Design | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The key, then, is how a school’s material identity advances its intellectual mission. As with any large institution, one imagines that the building of a university begins with a master plan. However, when the goal is to foster intellectual work and community, the concept of a master plan must be expanded to include distinctly intellectual components. For example, academic buildings often physically symbolize the type of scholarly exploration and research that takes place therein. Administrative centers, on the other hand, anchor the more idealistic work taking place in the lecture and science wings. At the same time, individual buildings can function collectively as didactic forums for the public, demonstrating such principles as energy and water-use efficiencies. Lastly, the circulation between the buildings themselves is important. Open green space, for instance, can accommodate crowds, lectures, and even protests, providing a counterpoint to the more stately, processional routes that crisscross a campus.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

In Metropolis, Sherin Wing begins a series featuring campus planning and planners.The first part focuses on UCLA and UC San Diego and includes insights from SCUPers Jeffrey Averill (UCLA) and Boone Hellmann (UCSD).

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Preserving construction site funds

Preserving construction site funds | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

A Midwestern state university budgeted about $12 million for a major addition to its library several years ago. At the time, there was not a tightly controlled project planning process at the institution and the library’s plaza—already a major central gathering space on campus—was not included in the project budget.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUPer Phillip S. Waite of Utah State University is a major source for this excellent article. His book, A Non-Architect's Guide to Major Capital Projects, is published by SCUP.


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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

If you’re not the one who’s controlling your learning— you’re not going to learn as well: 


Paloma raised her hand.


“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”


Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.


“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said. …


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Cumberland County College partnership helps unemployed find manufacturing jobs | University Business Magazine

Cumberland County College partnership helps unemployed find manufacturing jobs | University Business Magazine | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The jobs were there, but the skilled workers were not. That’s why Cumberland County College formed a partnership with local industries to train unemployed workers for in-demand manufacturing jobs in the region.
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Trend— Architecture intended to shape behavior

Trend— Architecture intended to shape behavior | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In 1966, a British planner called Maurice Broady came up with a new term for the architectural lexicon: architectural determinism.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
SCUPers continue to learn and share about the planning and design of environments to facilitate and stimulate learning. A similar growth in attention to health care design has an even stronger drive behind it, “because that’s where behavioural changes have life and death consequences.”A recent and related SCUP member resource is the report-out from the first Chapman Prize Award, Research on Learning Space Design: Present State, Future Directions .Tags: Design, Architecture, Learning Environments, Healthcare, Behavior, Facilities Design“Fortunately, there’s a resurgence of belief that buildings can change behaviour, led by a few architectural journals: World Health Design, Environment Behavior and HERD.”This comes after decades of rejection so intense that in 1966 the term architectural determinism was coined to describe the practice of “groundlessly asserting that design solutions would change behavior in a predictable and positive way.”We like this conclusory sentence: “To give architecture back its mojo, a new interest in how architecture changes us must be fostered.”From The Conversation by Jan Golembiewski, Researcher in Environmental Determinants of Mental Health at University of Sydney
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