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SCUP Links
Members of the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) scan higher education, inside and out, and present this curated collection of links, articles, and resources. www.scup.org
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It's Time for a New Definition of Accreditation

It's Time for a New Definition of Accreditation | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Much will be revealed by the results of the forthcoming renewal of the Higher Education Act, which is the main law governing how federal dollars are distributed to colleges and students. Caution: History teaches that government regulatory programs grow and rarely decline


To meet the inevitable political challenges, an honest appraisal of the current situation must be confronted by academe. Specifically: Accreditation is not voluntary. It is not nongovernmental. It does not demonstrably provide definable quality assurance. It is overly keyed to an institution’s mission, making impossible some generic meaning of what a college or graduate is. And the underlying purpose—to maintain college independence through self-regulation and accountability—is seriously undermined, if not already at an end."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Milton Greenberg trolls the Academy.

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Listening to Students: Make Learning Spaces Your Own

Listening to Students: Make Learning Spaces Your Own | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

In this short film, we suggested that group collaboration (illustrated through the process of completing a class project) can happen anywhere, anyway, and anyhow, thanks to today's technological tools. But when we presented the film at the SCUP Conference in San Diego last July, one question audience members asked was, "Are you suggesting that remote collaboration can be a replacement for face-to-face interaction?"


In short, no.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
The 2014 SCUP conference, Plan for the Transformation of Higher Education, is July 13–17 in Pittsburgh. Learn more and register now! s://www.scup.org/page/eventsandeducation/annualconf/49/
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Online Education Has a Loneliness Problem. Can Harvard Fix It?

Online Education Has a Loneliness Problem. Can Harvard Fix It? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Herzlinger says MOOCs are suited to classes with objective, measurable outcomes. They don’t work as well for teaching conceptual or action-based ideas.


“Didactic courses are very adaptable to the Web,” she says. “I teach accounting as well, and there’s always a right answer. Those courses are easy. Innovation is much more challenging because it has to be interactive and team-based.”
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What Steve Blank Learned By Flipping the MOOC

What Steve Blank Learned By Flipping the MOOC | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Two of the hot topics in education in the last few years have been Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and the flipped classroom. I’ve been experimenting with both of them.


What I’ve learned (besides being able to use the word "pedagogy" in a sentence) is: 1) assigning students lectures as homework doesn’t guarantee the students will watch them and 2) in a flipped classroom you can become hostage to the pedagogy.


Here’s the story of what we tried and what we learned.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is a unique perspective on some hot-topic aspects in learning, part of the innovation and creativity that has been spurred by MOOCs. Perhaps not an intended outcome, but a welcome one. The author does a decent job of explaining the iterative improvements (planning process) in his course design.


STEVE BLANK is a retired Silicon Valley serial entrepreneur turned educator who developed the Customer Development methodology that changes the way startups are built. His book The Four Steps to the Epiphany launched the Lean Startup movement.
@sgblank

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Why Scientists Should Embrace the Liberal Arts

Why Scientists Should Embrace the Liberal Arts | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Science alone isn’t enough to solve the world’s problems."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Example— The resistance to vaccine use is a prime example. The supposed link between autism and common childhood vaccines was based on fraudulent research published in the British journal The Lancet in 1998. After the fraud was uncovered the lead author was stripped of his medical license and the article was retracted. Subsequent investigations by the Department of Health in the U.K. and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies in the U.S. as well as a definitive study published in the August 2013 issue of The Journal of Pediatrics have all debunked the vaccine–autism link. Yet the percentage of parents who delay or forgo immunization of their children has increased alarmingly in recent years and, partly as a result, measles, mumps and whooping cough are making a comeback.

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An Internal Hydraulic of Change | Theory to Practice

The core chemistry of higher education is transformed if and when the academy and those beyond it understand how a campus’s culture for learning is inextricably linked to multiple and progressive opportunities for engaged learning; the expectation that such engagement should occur for every student; the connection and cultivation of those learning experiences to broad and deep civic understanding and action; and the recognition that those elements of the institution’s commitment to higher learning and to its civic expression are fully bound up in treating students as whole learners—persons whose well-being is an objective of the opportunities and encouragement we as educators provide.


This means a transformation in how faculty see and express their basic responsibilities as educators and how students welcome and adopt the expectation of challenging and demanding involvement in their education. It means replacing institutional structures that artificially segment and restrict parts of a whole with integration and common objectives, and altering financial priorities and reward structures so as to provide the conditions needed to reach a tipping point, to have change occur and persist. (emphasis added)

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

By Don Harward, project director, BTtoP; president emeritus, Bates College; senior fellow, AAC&U

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The difficult, the dangerous, and the catastrophic: Managing the spectrum of climate risks

We argue that the notion of a single, global threshold of dangerous climate change, has outlived its usefulness as a focus for the climate discourse. In its place, we propose a new climate risk management framework that incorporates the inherent limits to mitigation and adaptation, and links scientific risk assessment with social values and risk perceptions. This risk management quadrants framework overcomes the problems with the dangerous threshold by restructuring the climate challenge around minimizing collective suffering, rather than averting a distant catastrophe.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting concept that could apply to other kinds of risk management. What do you think?

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Who Says Libraries Are Going Extinct?

Who Says Libraries Are Going Extinct? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

With nearly 2.5 billion materials circulated through more than 16,000 public branches, 2013 was one of the strongest years for libraries in the past decade.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting programming breadth and scope is only part of what this article covers:


By being responsive to the unique needs of their communities, libraries have taken on sometimes surprising roles. In Tulsa, Oklahoma, for example, the central branch of the City-County library has a case worker from the state’s Family and Children Services agency on hand four hours a day, five days a week. In Ann Arbor, Michigan, you can check out musical instruments, microscopes, telescopes, and home tools. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, New York libraries offered direct assistance to residents who needed help rebuilding. The Sacramento Public Library in California hosts Punk Rock Aerobics, led by one of its librarians. Outside Rochester, New York, you can check out fishing poles. In Dallas, Texas, a public library facilitates Coffee and Conversations, one-hour sessions for the homeless; more than 70 people attended the second meeting. And in Woodbine, Iowa, you can borrow cake pans.

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The University of Windsor is the 300th STARS-related institution!

The University of Windsor is the 300th STARS-related institution! | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

STARS is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to gauge relative progress toward sustainability.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

STARS is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to gauge relative progress toward sustainability.

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Engaging Evidence: How Independent Colleges and Universities Use Data to Improve Student Learning

Engaging Evidence: How Independent Colleges and Universities Use Data to Improve Student Learning | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

A useful Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) report describing how 40 institutions formed a network to better use the results of student outcomes assessment.

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Cognitive Skills or Soft Skills? Policy Implications

Cognitive Skills or Soft Skills? Policy Implications | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

In the latter part of the 20th century, behavioral scientists and society more generally adopted a cultural belief that cognitive ability was the most significant determinant of educational and workforce outcomes. This led to efforts to raise students test scores, the promotion of teachers who were successful in doing so, and heavy if not exclusive reliance on test scores for admissions and employment screening.


But behavioral science research in psychology and economics suggests that non-cognitive factors—soft skills such as motivation, work ethic, teamwork, organization, cultural awareness, and effective communication—play a role that is as important or even more important in determining success in school and in the workplace.


So the 21st century is becoming the era in which we recognize the importance of soft skills, the role education plays in developing those skills, and the way they evolve throughout the life cycle. And we are developing new education, training, and intervention methods and new assessments in recognition of this importance.

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2014 Trends & Challenges in higher ed IT planning | NMC Horizon Report

2014 Trends & Challenges in higher ed IT planning | NMC Horizon Report | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition— A much-awaited annual document that identifies “six key trends, six significant challenges, and six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning.”

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‘If These Halls Could Talk’: Essential Skills for a Multicultural Campus | SCUP–49 workshop, July, Pittsburgh

‘If These Halls Could Talk’: Essential Skills for a Multicultural Campus | SCUP–49 workshop, July, Pittsburgh | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

“‘If These Halls Could Talk’: Essential Skills for a Multicultural Campus”— is a Sunday morning workshop at SCUP–49 this summer, developed from a highly-rated 2010 concurrent presentation. The following are representative attendee reviews then of Lee Mun Wah’s SCUP–45 contribution to SCUP’s programming: “Thought-provoking "thought-provoking"; “original”; and ‘[the] best presentation at the conference. This year, he will demonstrate how attendees can deepen campus dialogues and mediate conflicts between students, faculty, and staff. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Since then, Lee Mun Wah has directed the movie, The Color of Fear: “This is the dialogue most of us fear, but hope will happen sometime in our lifetime.” Part 1 can be viewed in the SCUP Mojo.

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One-Quarter of Adults Hold Educational Credentials Other Than an Academic Degree, Census Bureau Reports

One-Quarter of Adults Hold Educational Credentials Other Than an Academic Degree, Census Bureau Reports | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In this report, we've been able to measure for the first time how many people take another route to a productive career: holding an alternative educational credential independent of traditional college degrees. It turns out that millions of people have taken this path," added Ewert.

These alternative credentials include professional certifications, licenses and educational certificates. The fields of these professional certifications and licenses were wide-ranging and include business/finance management, nursing, education, cosmetology and culinary arts, among others.

The report shows that, in general, these alternative credentials provide a path to higher earnings. Among full-time workers, the median monthly earnings for someone with a professional certification or license only was $4,167, compared with $3,433 for one with an educational certificate only; $3,920 for those with both types of credentials; and $3,110 for people without any alternative credential.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Certification or alternative credentials have the most positive impact for workers with no college or an associate's degree. Nice to have this benchmark. The more we learn the more we have to change.

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Survival Requires Taking Time for Important Conversations Outside of Administrative Minutiae

Survival Requires Taking Time for Important Conversations Outside of Administrative Minutiae | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
On Friday, January 31, a group of fifteen faculty and staff  came together as students for the first local "discussion section" of the MOOC on the future of higher education at SUNY Fredonia.   We ...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This could be a useful quote for planners: "As a provost, I find that I have to be determined and disciplined not to let the tyranny of administrative minutiae take command of my head space.  I think it’s a matter of survival that we take time to have important conversations like this."

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ELI 2014: MOOCs and MOOC Research (with images, tweets) · kreshleman

From sessions on MOOCs and MOOC research...biggest takeaway for me is that MOOCs are moving away from disruption toward another tool in the toolkit of ed tech in higher ed.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Awesome technology turns tweets from the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative meeting into a slide show of volunteer reporting-out. It's not a replacement for being there, of course, but we weren't  :(


We especially like slide 12.


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6 key findings about going to college

6 key findings about going to college | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Amidst College-educated millennials are outperforming their less-educated peers on virtually every economic measure, and the gap between the two groups has only grown over time.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Amidst all the other uncertainties, this gives planners a secure leg on demand, because this particular outcome measure of a degree can be quantified. On the other hand, there are cost and capacity to consider. What else?

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The Civic Series | Bringing Theory to Practice, from AAC&U

The Civic Series | Bringing Theory to Practice, from AAC&U | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The Civic Series
  1. Civic Provocations
  2. Civic Values, Civic Practices
  3. Civic Studies
  4. Civic Learning and Teaching
  5. Civic Engagement, Civic Development and Higher Education
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Great series, from which parts 1–3 are already available as a free pdf download.

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Texas library offers glimpse of bookless future

Texas library offers glimpse of bookless future | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Texas has seen the future of the public library, and it looks a lot like an Apple Store: Rows of glossy iMacs beckon. iPads mounted on a tangerine-colored bar invite readers.

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Rethinking Education with Design Thinking

Rethinking Education with Design Thinking | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
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We explored some of the most collaborative and creative examples of this new learning thinking in the Bay Area. This started with Brightworks, an experimental school in San Francisco’s Mission neighborhood started by Gever Tulley, TED speaker and author of 50 Dangerous Things (You Should Let Your Children Do). My first impression of Brightworks was that it was just north of chaos—but with great results for engaging the kids with learning. Starting with an empty space and no traditional classrooms, the school is fascinating because the kids are literally building their environment as a part of the hands-on process of exploring their current projects. The teachers facilitate these projects and offer advice or guidance when asked. Guest speakers and spontaneous field trips help the students understand the various aspects of the project.

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Colleges and analysts respond to Obama ratings proposal

Nice summary of some of the many responses.

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Soft Skills for the Workplace | Change Magazine

Soft Skills for the Workplace | Change Magazine | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

It was not that long ago that many management consultants, economists, industrial-organizational psychologists, and laypeople believed that cognitive skill was the single most important predictor. What happened to change that?

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"[B]ehavioral science research in psychology and economics suggests that non-cognitive factors—soft skills such as motivation, work ethic, teamwork, organization, cultural awareness, and effective communication—play a role that is as important or even more important in determining success in school and in the workplace.


So the 21st century is becoming the era in which we recognize the importance of soft skills, the role education plays in developing those skills, and the way they evolve throughout the life cycle. And we are developing new education, training, and intervention methods and new assessments in recognition of this importance."

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The attack on higher ed — and why we should welcome it | TED Blog

The attack on higher ed — and why we should welcome it | TED Blog | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
George Siemens taught the first MOOC back in 2008. He shares his take on why they're still valid -- and what might happen next in higher ed.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"The linear nature of MOOC solutions to the perceived problems of higher education (better instructional software and greater numbers of learners) failed to account for knowledge building as an integrated social, economic and cultural activity of society."

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Exercise patience, preparation and perseverance to land your dream job in the Academy

Exercise patience, preparation and perseverance to land your dream job in the Academy | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Becoming a chief academic officer takes years of preparation. Dawn Z. Hodges explains how she gained the necessary skills and persisted through her job search.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This: "I believe the more you know about the college as a whole and how the different divisions work together, the more effective you can be as a dean or a chief academic officer — and the more valuable you are to the college."

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Big Idea 2014: Base Degrees on What We Know, Not How Long We Spent in a Classroom | Jeff Selingo

Big Idea 2014: Base Degrees on What We Know, Not How Long We Spent in a Classroom | Jeff Selingo | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

My big idea for 2014 is that more colleges shift from measuring learning based on how much time students spend in a classroom to a system that is based on how much they actually know. The official term for this is “competency-based education,” and this past year, three universities—Northern Arizona University, the University of Wisconsin, and Southern New Hampshire—experimented with offering degrees in this way.


Here’s how it basically works: Students demonstrate mastery of a subject through a series of assessment tests or assignments, instead of following a prescribed set of courses. Faculty mentors work closely with students throughout a degree program to design a schedule and access the learning materials they need to demonstrate mastery and then another group of course evaluators grades those exams, research papers, or performance assessments.


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

As a LinkedIn thought leader, Selingo was asked to provide a "big idea" to this series of big ideas/

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