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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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The NCAA vs. Student Athletes: The End of the 'the Best Business Model in the World'?

The NCAA vs. Student Athletes: The End of the 'the Best Business Model in the World'? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
"The players are the workers who generate the money."
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"College sports is a multi-billion-dollar business. Do its workers deserve to be paid? 

It's a simple question taking a convoluted journey through our legal system. But student-athletes are closer to getting their day in court, since a judge ruled yesterday that NCAA athletes can legally pursue a cut of the billions of dollars flowing to college sports through TV deals."

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Rebekah Brown, CPA's comment, March 7, 2013 10:28 AM
Very interesting article. NCAA is a big business.... but they prevent their athletes from having a job and in some cases a decent education (they are just not alloted the time) So should they be compensated in some other way? And if they do how does it change the world of college sports?
250657's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:05 AM

This article enlightens readers about how hard student athletes work to make college sports a multi-billion dollar business yet the athletes do not get paid.

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Is the Lecture Dead?

Is the Lecture Dead? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Medical education isn't just about conveying information as efficiently as possible. A lecture, done right, gets to the heart of why a lesson is worth learning.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

To be cynical, one might point out that not everyone can be good at every art form, and the professors tend not to even get any training at all for learning how to lecture:


"[R]ecalling the words of Mark Twain, widespread reports of the lecture's demise are somewhat exaggerated. I believe that we should revisit this venerable educational method before we sign its death certificate. To be sure, some lectures seem to exert a narcotic effect on the attention and enthusiasm of learners, and there are more than a few lecturers in health professions schools whose impact can best be described as deadening. But there are boring small group sessions, too, and even some new, highly touted technologies have turned out not to enliven education.

In other words, there are good lectures and bad lectures, just as there are good lecturers and bad lecturers. Rather than disposing entirely of the lecture as a means of learning, we should attempt to understand better the features that distinguish effective, engaging lectures from those that leave learners limp."

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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s comment, February 3, 2013 5:01 PM
Anne, thank you. Good insights. It would be great if you shared them in our Mojo: http://mojo.scup.org.
Anne Bosworth's comment, February 3, 2013 6:48 PM
Hey, thanks. I'll get over there as soon as I come up for air here. Is this discussion alive in a special thread on that site?
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s comment, February 7, 2013 7:19 AM
No, it's not. The posts here are simultaneously posted in LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and in the activity stream in the Mojo. But I haven't found a way to get them in there are searchable and continually displayed content yet.
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College as Country Club: Do Colleges Cater to Students' Preferences for Consumption? (PDF)

College as Country Club: Do Colleges Cater to Students' Preferences for Consumption? (PDF) | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

This paper investigates whether demand-side market pressure explains colleges’ decisions to provide consumption amenities to their students. We estimate a discrete choice model of college demand using micro data from the high school classes of 1992 and 2004, matched to extensive information on all four-year colleges in the U.S. We find that most students do appear to value college consumption amenities, including spending on student activities, sports, and dormitories. While this taste for amenities is broad-based, the taste for academic quality is confined to high-achieving students. The heterogeneity in student preferences implies that colleges face very different incentives depending on their current student body and the students who the institution hopes to attract. We estimate that the elasticities implied by our demand model can account for 16 percent of the total variation across colleges in the ratio of amenity to academic spending, and including them on top of key observable characteristics (sector, state, size, selectivity) increases the explained variation by twenty percent.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

An excellent read. As well, the related Inside Higher Ed story by Scott Jaschik, The Customer is Always Right, includes some good analysis and reaction to this paper by other higher education experts such as Jane V. Wellman, a Planning for Higher Education contributor.


For The Chronicle of Higher Education, Scott Carlson writes this up as What's the Payoff for the 'Country Club' College?

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Anne Bosworth's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:13 PM

What else can they do when we've collectively created a culture that insists on college for anyone who wants a good job? Businesses often use a college degree as a tool of exclusion, so more and more people want one. Mix this in with the wider issues of consumer culture, the change from college as intellectual exercise to college as vocational training, and our increasing culture of entitlement and I'd expect nothing but increased demands upon colleges to meet student "appetites."

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Productivity = ?

Productivity = ? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"We have been discussing productivity in higher education policy circles for decades (some of you will remember Bruce Johnson's theory of “learning productivity” from the 1990s). But now that what people see as an increasingly essential good is slipping out of the hands of many citizens because of rising costs and prices, some of our most respected researchers are taking on the task of determining how we might measure our productivity. It's in our own self-interest that our best minds work on this problem, since they are sensitive to the different missions and student populations in the sprawling system of colleges and universities in this country."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is the introduction to an issue of Change magazine focused on productivity issues. 

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Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education

Improving Measurement of Productivity in Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Higher education is a critical element of the American economy, because of both its benefits and its costs to individuals and taxpayers. Yet we know very little about the relationships between the things colleges and universities do and the resources they need to do them. Currently, shrinking public support and increasing tuition make it urgent that we understand our own productivity and how to measure it. The challenge we face is to contain costs without compromising quality or accessibility.


This article summarizes the report of the National Research Council Panel on Measuring Higher Education Productivity (NRC 2012a). Table 1, derived from material in the report, also appears in Massy, Sullivan, and Mackie (2013)."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
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Effective Campuswide Digital Signage Communications

Effective Campuswide Digital Signage Communications | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"By implementing a system that is both reliable and scalable, we have also experienced significant economies of scale with regard to resources for networking, system infrastructure, security, disaster-recovery, software licensing, training, and support. We can now conduct strategic campus-level initiatives concerning UBC branding and emergency broadcasting with confidence. From a content perspective, there is now more uniformity and consistency to our branding message—thanks to a centrally managed system where units also can easily syndicate content across the entire network."

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Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building

Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building, by Nathan F. AllemanL. Neal Holly, and Carla A. CostelloPlanning for Higher Education, v41n2 (2013)

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Download it now through next Friday in the Planning for Higher Ed Mojo.


"Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building," by Nathan F. AllemanL. Neal Holly, and Carla A. CostelloPlanning for Higher Education, v41n2 (2013)


  • We have a way for every kind of learner to learn from this knowledge piece. You can read the article itself. 
  • Or you can watch, listen to, or read a transcript of our Planning interview with the authors: watch that interview, listen to or download that interview (MP3), or read that interview. 
  • Or you can read a summary of the Planning interview in the form of a blog post with questions.


Please share your thoughts.


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Faculty Representation in Governance - ProfHacker

Faculty Representation in Governance - ProfHacker | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Because the mere presence of some faculty members doesn’t constitute representation."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Some suggestions for steps to take to achieve a more meaningful faculty representation on committees. Interesting in light of the video interview for this Friday's Planning article in SCUP's Mojo.

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Essay on what professors can learn from MOOCs by Coursera Co-Founder

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"MOOCs are still the wild west of higher education, and there is no “one size fits all” approach to building one."


Yes, they are, including ours.

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Personal contact in disrupted institutions and other thoughts on SCUP MOOC2 Weeks 1 and 2 - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo

Personal contact in disrupted institutions and other thoughts on SCUP MOOC2 Weeks 1 and 2 - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Great to travel back through this year’s MOOC to SCUP 47 and Sandy Shugart’s wonderful talk then, connecting university history and culture to the future, and…
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Couper's insights from our fall 2012 MOOC continue in 2013:


"Then today tuning in to this week’s video conversation, hearing Joan ask about personal contact and quality in the age of MOOCs gets back to these disciple-master roots of learning-teaching. Today as an architect, I wonder how colleges and universities continue to find personal value for students and faculty, avoiding the institutional ways that medieval faith and empire co-opted prior more direct knowledge transfer?


This week’s panel connected Sandy’s use of groups of students exploring the same questions to the power of ideation sessions that “allow percolation up,” and left me seeing ideas bubbling through the “white water” of change now. Sandy’s future orientation had spurred me to connect design thinking to planning, as had Luis Rico-Gutierrez so eloquently at the North Central conference two years ago, and as Michael pointing to designing backwards from the vision, then to set the first steps toward it."

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Can Neanderthals Be Brought Back from the Dead?

Can Neanderthals Be Brought Back from the Dead? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In a SPIEGEL interview, synthetic biology expert George Church of Harvard University explains how DNA will become the building material of the future -- one that can help create virus-resistant human beings and possibly bring back lost species...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

If you lack a sense of urgency about the need for higher education to move quickly, think for a moment about what the increasing pace of change might bring as external forces. What would it mean for higher education and lifelong learning if a lifespan of 120 could be achieved through genetic manipulation?

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MOOCs: ‘dropout’ a category mistake, look at ‘uptake’?

MOOCs: ‘dropout’ a category mistake, look at ‘uptake’? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
"Is it inappropriate to take the word ‘dropout’ from one context and stamp it upon another? With MOOCs I’d call it a category mistake, when a word is used to mean one thing (pejoratively) in the context of a long school, college or University course, then applied with the same pejorative force to a very different type of learning experience. Stopping during a MOOC is very different from dropping out school, an expensive long-term degree or a compulsory compliance course."
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We say, "Yes," to this proposal. If you read just one article, or an executive summary of it, you've learned something in SCUP's Change & Disruption MOOC:


MOOCs encourage the ‘look see’ approach to learning, and as they are free or very cheap, the consequences are negligible. Do the people who don’t finish a MOOC rush back to college or Universities with cheques in their hand? Of course not. The decision to take or drop out of a MOOC is not a life changing decision in terms of money, time or commitment.

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'Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change | Part One - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo

'Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change | Part One - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Welcome to SCUP's Change & Disruption cMOOC Week Two
The following article from Planning for Higher Education v41n2 is published here today, and availa…
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The following article from Planning for Higher Education v41n2 is available to everyone free, only from today through next Thursday.


Part One of "Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change" by Donald NorrisRobert Brodnick,Paul LefrereJoseph Gilmour, and Linda Baer(Part Two will be published on February 8.)


Almost twenty years ago, the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) published the book Transforming Higher Education: A Vision for Learning in the 21st Century (THE), written by Michael G. Dolence and Donald M. Norris. THE served as a manifesto of how the teaching, training, experiences, and perspectives offered by higher education needed to be realigned with the needs of society, then redesigned, redefined, and reengineered.

Today, higher education is faced with pressure to transform broadly and rapidly, partially because we have failed to achieve significant and needed change. ... This paper sets the stage for this conversation.

Part One

Revisiting What the Future Looked Like in 1995

Tracking Other Voices from 1995 to the Present

Establishing 2013 as Our New Vantage Point for the Future


Part Two (February 8)

Reinventing Strategies, Business Models, and Emerging Practices

Getting Started, Getting it Done

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Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building

Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

You can now download the article, "Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building"—but only until Thursday night. Download it now!

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Citation: "Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building," by Nathan F. AllemanL. Neal Holly, and Carla A. CostelloPlanning for Higher Education, v41n2 (2013)

We have a way for every kind of learner to learn from this knowledge piece. You can read the article itself, above.


Or you can watch, listen to, or read a transcript of our Planning interview with the authors: watch that interviewlisten to or download that interview (MP3), or read that interview


Or you can read a summary of the Planning interview in the form of a blog post, with questions.

Design your own Personal Learning Experience in our cMOOC. Please share your thoughts.

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Four finalists for Kent State's new architecture school building design

Four finalists for Kent State's new architecture school building design | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Whether out of caution or bureaucratic complexity or institutional inertia, KSU has ended up with four design proposals that collectively fail to create the big buzz such a big project deserves - but the Weiss/Manfredi concept is a clear winner.
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Change Magazine - January-February 2013

Change Magazine - January-February 2013 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Here we introduce a new feature for Change: accounts of what academics have chosen to do after retirement. If you have found revitalization in retirement, please send me a brief account of what activities have done that for you, as well as how they link (or don't) to your former work.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUP will continue to share items in this series—both for the sake of planning for higher education and for the sake of the personal retirement thinking of our constituents. What wil we do in retirement? How can we make better use of retirees?
 

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The A to Z of Social Media for Academia

The A to Z of Social Media for Academia | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
This post accompanies the newly established ‘Social Media News’ email list for academics and university support staff, sharing info about the latest platforms for use by academics in th...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Nice list. Found too many new things we'll have to look at now.

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Digital and Web in Higher Ed | University Business Magazine

Digital and Web in Higher Ed | University Business Magazine | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"After 38 articles, I finally get a chance to make New Year’s “predictions” about the 12 months to come. Unfortunately, I don’t own a crystal ball yet. But, all this time spent tracking and analyzing trends should help with the exercise of grasping what’s to come in 2013 for internet technologies in higher education."

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Trends Report: New facilities enhance the quality of campus life

Trends Report: New facilities enhance the quality of campus life | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Institutions of higher learning are investing heavily in new facilities—student unions, dining facilities, residence halls, and the like—that address the non-academic side of campus life.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The Higher Education Market Remains Strong— The Chronicle finds that states’ funding is up a bit, mostly. Moody’s doesn’t think much of higher education in 2013. What to think? In “Trends Report: New Facilities enhance the quality of campus life,” Building Design + Construction magazine lines up with The Chronicle, and finds that “for AEC firms, The higher education market remains strong.”

To come to that conclusion they spoke with many SCUP members, some of whom were quoted in the report, such as Kate Diamond, principal with HMC Architects, James Goblirsch, vice president with HGA Architects and Engineers, Craig Hamilton, principal with Cannon Design, David Hatton, vice president with Stantec, John Jokerst, senior vice president with Carter & Associates, Dan Malecha, senior project manager with McGough Construction, and Luke Voiland, architect with Shepley Bulfinch.

This debate is also being shaped by multiple cultural factors. The advent of social media now means that learning can take place anywhere and everywhere, says David Hatton, Vice President in the Philadelphia office of A/E giant Stantec. “There’s out-of-the-classroom, social experience learning in terms of leadership and how students get along with one another.”


Much of a student’s success is tied to socialization and having community space to get to know and interact with peers, says James Goblirsch, AIA, LEED AP, Principal and Vice President at HGA Architects and Engineers, Minneapolis. This change in the nature of higher education is impacting the design of new residence halls, many of which now provide study areas and learning spaces in addition to sleeping quarters.

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2 Questions— Space Change Organizational Trauma & How Do Faculty Use Space? - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo

2 Questions— Space Change Organizational Trauma & How Do Faculty Use Space? - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In our Planning interview with the authors of Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building, which will be released t…
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

In our Planning interview with the authors of "Agency and Influence: The Organizational Impact of a New School of Education Building," which will be released tomorrow, two faculty-related questions were raised that I thought worthy of further discussion.


You can watch that interviewlisten to or download that interview (MP3), or read that interview. These questions are independent of the article's content.


Question 1: Space Change Organizational Trauma


Do planners typically alert the occupants, such as faculty, who are planning new space, or moving into new space, that the move itself can be organizationally traumatic?


Question 2: How Do Faculty Use Space?


In the case of a building like the education building that is the topic of this interview, do planners study—pre- and post-move—how the faculty use spaces? If so, are the compilations or resources that share the process or results of such studies available?

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State Spending on Higher Education Rebounds in Most States After Years of Decline

State Spending on Higher Education Rebounds in Most States After Years of Decline | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Thirty states increased their higher-education budgets, but overall spending dropped by 0.4 percent because of larger cuts in some of the biggest states.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"Barring a further downturn in the economy, the relatively small overall change ... suggests that higher education may be at the beginning stages of a climb out of the fiscal trough caused by the last recession," says a news release accompanying the survey data.


That small bit of optimism was balanced, however, by a new report from Moody's Investors Services, which issued a negative outlook for the entire higher-education sector in 2013. That assessment includes even the most competitive research universities, which the credit-rating agency had previously given a stable outlook.

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Public Universities to Offer Free Online Classes for Credit

Public Universities to Offer Free Online Classes for Credit | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In an unusual arrangement with a commercial company, the universities hope that those who pass the free courses will pay tuition to complete a degree program.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

It's here: A free intro course, for credit. And maybe you'll like the experience enough to select that school for more. And maybe the school learns more about you when you take the course.


“It’s a bold strategy on the part of the institutions,” said Michael Tanner, vice president for academic affairs at the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. “In some sense, it’s a new recruitment strategy: give them a free sample, and maybe they’ll find they have an appetite for it. It’s hard to say how well it will work. The MOOC business will become crowded over time.”

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Cornell NYC Tech Will Foster Commerce Amid Education

Cornell NYC Tech Will Foster Commerce Amid Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
At Cornell NYC Tech, a new graduate school focusing on applied science, the most striking departure of all may be the relationship it sets forth between university and industry.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Innovative in so many ways:


"Cornell NYC Tech, a new graduate school focusing on applied science, is a bold experiment on many fronts: a major expansion for an august upstate school, a high-impact real estate venture for Roosevelt Island, an innovative collaboration with a foreign university, a new realm of influence for City Hall. But the most striking departure of all may be the relationship it sets forth between university and industry, one in which commerce and education are not just compatible, they are also all but indistinguishable. In this new framework, Cornell NYC Tech is not just a school, it is an “educational start-up,” students are “deliverables” and companies seeking access to those students or their professors can choose from a “suite of products” by which to get it."

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Challenges Ahead for the U. of California - Administration - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Challenges Ahead for the U. of California - Administration - The Chronicle of Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Mark Yudof is stepping down in August. His successor may face no less than a major rethinking of the breadth and scope of the 10-campus system itself.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The author suggests that California might select a political or business as his replacement.


Yet as search consultants note, the pool of applicants with the academic, managerial, and political chops to oversee an enterprise as complex and respected as the University of California may not be all that large, even though the job is likely to pay pretty well. The system has 234,000 students, about 208,000 faculty and staff members, more than 1.6 million alumni, and an annual operating budget of $22.7-billion. Mr. Yudof makes nearly $600,000 a year.


"It would not surprise us if California chose a political or business figure, given the current political and economic climate," said Lucy Apthorp Leske, vice president and co-director of the education and nonprofit practice at Witt/Kieffer, a search firm.


That kind of choice might signal a shift in direction for the university system, one that some higher-education policy analysts say may be overdue. Mr. Yudof deserves "high marks for stability," said Patrick Callan, one such analyst with deep California ties, but not for "innovation or charting new directions."

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A Home-Schooling Pioneer Looks to the Future

A Home-Schooling Pioneer Looks to the Future | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Mary Pride, a hero to conservative Christians, embraces technology and the Internet.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A reminder of what things looked like 20 years ago in computer-based education.

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Terry Harding's curator insight, November 10, 2013 3:51 PM

Here is a home schooling pioneer's comments on past adventures and current curriculum trends.