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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Blog post comparing academe to a drug gang provokes much discussion

Scott Jaschick reviews a currently popular blog post that compares the behavior of newly minted PhDs to those who seek to join drug gangs.


Then [the blogger] turns to academe and finds very similar conditions. "The academic job market is structured in many respects like a drug gang, with an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core of insiders. Even if the probability that you might get shot in academia is relatively small (unless you mark student papers very harshly), one can observe similar dynamics," he writes. "Academia is only a somewhat extreme example of this trend, but it affects labor markets virtually everywhere....  Academic systems more or less everywhere rely at least to some extent on the existence of a supply of 'outsiders' ready to forgo wages and employment security in exchange for the prospect of uncertain security, prestige, freedom and reasonably high salaries that tenured positions entail."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Here's the original blog post.

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Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

It’s been 30 years since I developed the notion of “multiple intelligences.” I have been gratified by the interest shown in this idea and the ways it’s been used in schools, museums, and businesses around the world. But one unanticipated consequence has driven me to distraction—and that’s the tendency of many people, including persons whom I cherish, to credit me with the notion of ‘learning styles’ or to collapse ‘multiple intelligences’ with ‘learning styles.’ It’s high time to relieve my pain and to set the record straight.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Gardner summarizes:


As an educator, I draw three primary lessons for educators:


1. Individualize your teaching as much as possible. Instead of “one size fits all,” learn as much as you can about each student, and teach each person in ways that they find comfortable and learn effectively. Of course this is easier to accomplish with smaller classes. But ‘apps’ make it possible to individualize for everyone.


2. Pluralize your teaching. Teach important materials in several ways, not just one (e.g. through stories, works of art, diagrams, role play). In this way you can reach students who learn in different ways. Also, by presenting materials in various ways, you convey what it means to understand something well. If you can only teach in one way, your own understanding is likely to be thin.


3. Drop the term “styles.” It will confuse others and it won’t help either you or your students.

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Julie Ekner Koch's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:14 AM

Important points about individualized teaching

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Collaborative Book on Teaching with Technology

Collaborative Book on Teaching with Technology | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Deutsch is looking for authors.

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Dr. Nellie Deutsch's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:32 AM

Learning has no borders when it comes to technology. Today, students and teachers can connect for learning 24/7. They no longer need to be in the same physical space. However, connecting face-to-face in realtime is very important to the learning process. Teaching in a Live Online Class can be very rewarding for the teacher and student. 
There are many benefits to the face-to-face real time online learning environment that require our attention. Teaching in a asynchronous non-time dependent learning platform is not enough for today’s student. Students need immediate gratifications.

Students need to have the opportunity to be with the instructor in real time, so they can get immediate response to their questions and not have to wait. They need to see the teacher in action. What is your opinion. 

Please fill in the form if you're interested in writing a chapter or chapters and collaborating on a book on teaching with technology and sharing your experiences. The first chapter/s draft is due on December 31, 2013. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YxzzlY_9l7dE7nNwV4ezWqRaVSzNBTmFXvzCddS_uCg/viewform

Dr. Nellie Deutsch's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:32 AM

Learning has no borders when it comes to technology. Today, students and teachers can connect for learning 24/7. They no longer need to be in the same physical space. However, connecting face-to-face in realtime is very important to the learning process. Teaching in a Live Online Class can be very rewarding for the teacher and student. 
There are many benefits to the face-to-face real time online learning environment that require our attention. Teaching in a asynchronous non-time dependent learning platform is not enough for today’s student. Students need immediate gratifications.

Students need to have the opportunity to be with the instructor in real time, so they can get immediate response to their questions and not have to wait. They need to see the teacher in action. What is your opinion. 

Please fill in the form if you're interested in writing a chapter or chapters and collaborating on a book on teaching with technology and sharing your experiences. The first chapter/s draft is due on December 31, 2013. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YxzzlY_9l7dE7nNwV4ezWqRaVSzNBTmFXvzCddS_uCg/viewform

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New Study Says Open-Plan Offices Are Bad

New Study Says Open-Plan Offices Are Bad | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

[C]riticisms of the open-plan are legion. But Burkeman’s predictable diatribe was backed up by a new Harvard study that reached some fairly unhealthy conclusions about open-plan offices. The study, by researchers Jungsoo Kim and Richard de Dear, found that of the 42,700 office workers surveyed, nearly half of those in completely open-plan offices (sans partitions) complained about environmental noise levels. Even more surprising, cubicle workers—distinguished between those in offices with low and high partitions—were more greatly disatisfied with the noise around their workstations. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is our shocked face /

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2013 SCUP Excellence in Landscape Architecture, Open Space Honor Award

2013 SCUP Excellence in Landscape Architecture, Open Space Honor Award | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Discovery Walk is a collaborative art project that speaks of the medical school’s identity and heritage. The story of the school and its famous individuals is told on 400 granite panels photo-etched with photographs, letters, and medical illustrations illuminating a dynamic history.


The jury said, “ . . . very transformative . . . huge commitment of institution . . . eloquently executed . . . elegant, simple solution . . .. still retains sense of individuality . . .”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
This project is at Stanford University. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now. #SCUPPA
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Plan for Transformation in Higher Education

Plan for Transformation in Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A Polar Vortex day in Pittsburgh! Don't worry, it will be much warmer when 1,500 of your colleagues and peers come to town in July!


Join more than 1,500 colleagues who are leaders in planning for transformation in higher education. Pittsburgh, July 12–16. Be there for higher education's premier planning event in 2014.

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Liberal Education | Fall 2013 | Index

Liberal Education | Fall 2013 | Index | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
President’s MessageIf Competency Is the Goal, Then Students’ Own Work Is the Key to Reaching It
By Carol Geary Schneider 
Ultimately, we need to evaluate the “transformative” claims made for any specific innovation—whether digital, face-to-face, or blended—against the evidence of student competency that is (or is not) transparently demonstrated in students’ own portfolios of educational accomplishments.

FEATURED TOPIC


The MOOC Moment and the End of Reform

By Aaron Bady 

There is almost nothing new about the kind of online education that the word MOOC now describes. It’s been given a great deal of hype and publicity, but that aura of “innovation” poorly describes a technology that is not that distinct from the longer story of online education and that is designed to reinforce and reestablish the status quo.


A Plea for “Close Learning”
By Scott L. Newstok 
Some people pushing for MOOCs, to their credit, speak from laudably egalitarian impulses to provide access for disadvantaged students. But to what are these students being given access? Are broadcast lectures and online discussions the sum of a liberal education, or is it something 
more than “content” delivery? 

MOOCs and Democratic Education
 
By Leland Carver and Laura M. Harrison 
If MOOCs are truly on the point of “revolutionizing” higher education, then several important questions must urgently be raised and discussed—questions grounded in core social beliefs about the purpose of education.

PERSPECTIVESExperience Matters: Why Competency-Based Education Will Not Replace Seat Time
By Johann N. Neem
A good liberal arts education is not just about learning to write well or to think critically, or any other specific outcome or competency. Instead, it is also about putting students into contexts in which they are exposed to new ideas, asked to chew on them, and to talk or write about them.

A Troubled Adolescence: What the Fifteenth Birthday of the Bologna Process Means for Liberal Education
By Paul L. Gaston
If the vision of Bologna should prove insufficient to sustain its agenda, the most important accomplishment of the Bologna Process may be its having established a base camp from which a more important climb can begin.

Toward a Field of Interfaith Studies
 
By Eboo Patel
Scholars from a range of fields have long taken an interest in how people who orient around religion differently interact with one another. As the activity in this area increases, one crucial role for the academy is to give some definition to what is clearly an emerging field of research, study, and practice.

A Plea for Civil Discourse: Needed, the Academy’s Leadership 
By Andrea Leskes
Once we accept that students need to become adept civil discoursers—for their own and democracy’s good—how can college education foster this important skill?

MY VIEW

Thoughts on a “Liberating” Education
By Robert A. Scott
Undergraduate education is and must be as much about character and citizenship as about careers and commerce.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A good issue. Lots of addressing of the competency issue.

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A Tale of Two Signs—at Rice U and U of Houston—Art Animates the Campus

A Tale of Two Signs—at Rice U and U of Houston—Art Animates the Campus | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A review of the renovated Blaffer Art Museum and James Turrell's latest skyspace,
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A review by Alexandra Lange looks at the two campus projects, each of which features internal and external art space that engages with its surroundings.

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Lee Hall Addition, Clemson University School of Architecture

Lee Hall Addition, Clemson University School of Architecture | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

In designing Lee III, Phifer moved the courtyard concept indoors—into the new open, hangar-like hall, which soars to about 31 feet at the center of a gently arcing roof. He divided the indoor area into five bays of studios, partitioned by four double-level glass-and-steel bars for faculty offices and seminar rooms. Additional studios sit on open trays on the mezzanine level, connected by walkways. Entering from a bridge linking Lee II and Lee III, visitors look out and down to studios and student-review areas in this thrumming hub of activity.


Owing to the glazed walls and 25 skylights in the roof (along with additional internal skylights and windows), natural illumination permeates the space even on cloudy days. (Rather bald fluorescent fixtures supplement daylight when necessary). The central architectural feature is the grid of slender, treelike steel columns, 10 ¾ inches in diameter, made from oil-pipe sections. Near the ceiling, four branches extend outward from each column, seemingly to embrace donut-shaped coffers. These fiberglass rings, dematerialized by light filtering down from the glazed oculi, offer a mannerist-modern inversion of the classical notion of solid capitals crowning columns.

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Why I Am Dropping Out of Administration

Why I Am Dropping Out of Administration | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"I've come to several conclusions about working in administration:

 

  • Leading faculty members is not at all like running a business. It's about creating an atmosphere that allows faculty members to accomplish their goals and dreams. Some administrators fail to understand that.
  • Some faculty members are simply hard-wired to disagree with administrators. ...
  • Depending on what your administrative job is, you might be spending most of your time dealing with complaints. ...
  • As an administrator, you're never truly off duty. ...
  • While people often seek administrative posts because they see themselves as leaders, much of the day-to-day job is not really about leading. Instead, it is often about signing documents, approving travel requests, vetting adjuncts, writing evaluations, sending thank-you notes, creating committees. ...
  • Oddly, some administrative work is unavailable once you become an administrator. ... As a full-time administrator, however, I don't sit on any "faculty" committees. It seems a little ironic to me that once I step down from administration, I'll be eligible to do more committee work at the university level than I can do now.
  • The work of administration can be lonely."
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Complex.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:10 AM

This higher education focused post has relevance to anyone in a professional position who considers or has been in an administrative role.    

The role of a department or shared services business manager may be highlighted by the author's view that it isn't like running a business.  With higher education pressures today, that could be a serious omission.  ~  Deb

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SCUP Excellence in Planning for A District or Campus Component, Honor Award

SCUP Excellence in Planning for A District or Campus Component, Honor Award | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The jury said, “ . . . very compelling, want to be in the spaces. . . richness and layering of edges . . . great example of best use of environment. . . epitomizes town gown issues . . .”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This project is at the University of Washington, West Campus Housing. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

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UP CLOSE | Funding an uncertain future

UP CLOSE | Funding an uncertain future | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Almost five years after the onset of the recession, Yale is still facing a projected budget deficit of $40 million. Only about $120 million remain in the University’s rainy-day funds.
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What Strategists Can Learn from Architecture

What Strategists Can Learn from Architecture | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Managers routinely claim that their strategic planning process creates large, detailed documents, but often little else.  It’s as if the process serves no purpose other than to create the plan, and execution is somehow separate.


An approach that we think might work better would be to treat strategy making as if it were a design process. We’re not the first to propose that strategy borrows from design; in HBR articles, Henry Mintzberg drew the analogy with the potter throwing a bowl and Roger Martin has made an explicit connection with design.


But the aspect of design we want to focus on here is a bit different.

The key feature of the design process that interests us is the concept of “levels of design”, a notion that the creation of a design goes through a series of levels of increasing complexity and detail.

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Indian Universities Still Lag in World Rankings

Indian Universities Still Lag in World Rankings | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The three ranking surveys use methodologies that emphasize academic research and faculty citation in journals, followed by other measures like employer reputation, academic reputation, faculty-student ratio, and the international composition of faculty and students. Indian universities lose out on many of these fronts. In addition to lack of research citations, they perform badly on other metrics like faculty-to-student ratios and lack of internationalism.


To be sure, there is a debate around rankings methodology and whether it is fair to rate Indian universities against older and richer Western institutions.


“India has domestic priorities to educate more young people,” said Phil Baty, editor of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. Still, he said, “there should be an elite group of institutions that focus on global competitiveness.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Intense: "Competition to get into elite state-run colleges is fierce. Last year, 512,000 applicants sought admission for 9,647 spots in the 15 technology institutes and the Indian School of Mines. Indian news media regularly report on the exorbitant percentages required of graduating high school students to gain a spot at state-run institutions like Delhi University or Bombay University, sometimes upward of 99 percent in certain colleges for degrees in commerce or technology."

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At the New School’s New Building, a Sign Isn’t Just a Sign

At the New School’s New Building, a Sign Isn’t Just a Sign | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The “wayfinding” system of signs and staircases at the New School’s University Center, opening early next year, is designed to do more than get people from one point to another.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

“This is more about orientation than specific information,” said Mr. Marshall, who joined Mr. Baur on a tour recently. “As you move into the building, there are room numbers and specificity.”


The lettering has a three-dimensional appearance that plays on perspective to point people in the right direction. It is as though someone were shining a flashlight above the letters, and once you understand the system, you can tell which way to go from the way the letters face.


The letters differ from floor to floor, although the typefaces are all variations on a single font: Irma, designed by Peter Bil’ak. The lettering on the top floor has a deep shadow. The lettering on the ground floor has almost none.


“The idea is to give a tool for a place, a typeface for a place,” Mr. Baur said. “It’s a language which can be adopted in different contexts.”

Mr. Baur said the biggest challenge was not the staircases or the signs, but the “donor wall” in the lobby, with the names of people who had contributed money for the building.


“We never do that in Europe,” he said.


[faciities planning, wayfinding, North Atlantic, NY]

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SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, George Brown College, Toronto

SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture for a New Building, Honor Award, George Brown College, Toronto | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This project is at George Brown College in Toronto. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

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Wallflowers at the Revolution: Evolving Faculty Perspectives on Online Education

Wallflowers at the Revolution: Evolving Faculty Perspectives on Online Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The 2013 Inside Higher Ed Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology, jointly administered by Inside Higher Ed and Gallup, is the second annual attempt to gauge academic opinion on technology and teaching. Often, faculty opinion is based on little direct experience or familiarity, or biased based on their own plunge into online learning. Regardless, the evolving subjective perceptions of e-learning are fascinating to see unfold. Even when experiences are anecdotal or uniformed, this survey shows how, in aggregate, educational technology is gradually becoming a fixture within academe. But not without its nagging controversies. We are in the midst of something between an evolution and a revolution—a modification of business-as-usual and a major transformation. These findings provide a snapshot of our changing times, which will likely look dated and even naive a few years from now.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A valuable analysis and perspective of the data from this survey. We like the first subhead: "Lack of familiarity breeds contempt." [

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Harvard Launches Deans' Design Challenge to Proactively Change Urban Life by 2030

Harvard Launches Deans' Design Challenge to Proactively Change Urban Life by 2030 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

An entrepreneurial dose of design will soon grace the Harvard Innovation Lab. The i-lab announced Friday the launch of the Deans' Design Challenge, a contest aimed at addressing the challenges facing the world's swiftly growing population.

Design will join the ranks of Harvard's pre-existing Deans' Challenges. One focuses on cultural entrepreneurship, while the other is centered around health and life sciences. Sponsored by 13 deans from schools across Harvard and hosted by the i-lab, the contests' goals have been for students to create cross-disciplinary teams they can tackle social and health issues head-on with.

Between the two competitions, students were awarded a total of $150,000 last semester.

The theme of the inaugural Deans' Design Challenge is "Urban Life 2030." Participants will be tasked with developing tools that will improve the livability of our cities. The world's urban population is estimated to grow by roughly 50 percent in the next 15 years, according to the i-lab, and largely in less developed regions where an influx of individuals could compound the effects of existing transportation, safety, food, water and inequality issues.

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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 26, 2013 3:28 PM

Interesting facts of Urban Life by the year

2030

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Where Dreams Go to Die—Math Class?

Where Dreams Go to Die—Math Class? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Six core principles guide Carnegie's work. They are:

  1. Make the work problem-specific and user-centered. It starts with a single question: “What specifically is the problem we are trying to solve?” It engages key practitioners early and often as co-developers.

  2. Variation in performance is the core problem to address. The critical issue is not simply what works but rather what works for whom and under what set of conditions. Local context considerations lead to variability in implementation in ways that reduce effectiveness. Aim to advance efficacy reliably and at scale, adapt to local contexts, but test those adaptations to warrant them as improvements.

  3. Observe the system that produces the current outcomes. It is hard to improve what you do not fully understand. See how local conditions shape work processes. Make your hypotheses for change public and clear.

  4. We cannot improve at scale what we cannot measure. Embed measures of key outcomes and processes to track whether changes are improvements. We intervene in complex organizations. Anticipate unintended consequences and measure them too.

  5. Anchor practice improvement in disciplined inquiry. Engage rapid cycles of plan, do, study, act (PDSA) to learn fast, fail fast, and improve quickly. That failures occur is not the problem; that we fail to learn from them is.

  6. Accelerate improvements through networked communities. Embrace the wisdom of crowds.

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2013 SCUP Excellence in Landscape Architecture, Cornell Plantations

2013 SCUP Excellence in Landscape Architecture, Cornell Plantations | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The jury said the project was, “environmentally sound and natural . . . artfully done . . . from landscape perspective this project has love, tender care and maintenance . . . steward of the place.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This project is at Cornell University. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

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What Architects Should Know About LEED V4, in Brief

What Architects Should Know About LEED V4, in Brief | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
More than four years after its predecessor, and one year later than originally planned, LEED v4 will be launched at Greenbuild 2013. Was the wait worth it?
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The USGBC built in an overlap period, until June 1, 2015, in which projects can be registered to become certified under LEED 2009 or LEED v4. Then there's no wading back.

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2013 SCUP Excellence in Planning for New Campus, Honor Award

2013 SCUP Excellence in Planning for New Campus, Honor Award | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The jury said, “To be able to pull this off in a contemporary language in the desert is pretty amazing . . . both symbolic image and environmen­tally derived, integrated and aesthetically pure . . .”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This project is at Universidade Agostinho Neto (UAN), in Angola. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

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A Must-Have Resource— 'Planning for Assessing 21st Century Spaces for 21st Century Learners

A Must-Have Resource— 'Planning for Assessing 21st Century Spaces for 21st Century Learners | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
  • How do you measure return on investment of time, energy and funds expended in shaping and sustaining physical environments serving 21st century learners? 

  • How does space influence the nature of the learning experience?

  • How can focusing on what students are to become, on how learning happens drive the process of shaping and sustaining 21st century learning environments?
     

This guide, developed by a working group convened by the Learning Spaces Collaboratory, is a template for exploring such questions. It is intended to advance efforts on individual campuses to imagine and shape new spaces, reimagine and repurpose existing spaces; it is intended to inform the national dialogue about why attention to physical learning environments matters. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This valuable document is the result of nearly three years' of work by a dedicated and expert, cross-disciplinary and cross-departmental team. It was partially funded by an NSF grant.

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Yale's Struggles Signal Broader Challenges Ahead For Colleges

Yale's Struggles Signal Broader Challenges Ahead For Colleges | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Harkness Tower, situated in the Memorial Quadrangle at Yale (Photo credit: Wikipedia) For some time, the business model that supports traditional colleges and universities has been breaking.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

For some time, the business model that supports traditional colleges and universities has been breaking.

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2013 SCUP Excellence in Planning for an Existing Campus, Honor Award

2013 SCUP Excellence in Planning for an Existing Campus, Honor Award | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The jury said, “It is a university project but also a City of Philadelphia project in terms of its impact and how it extends the city. It gives to the city.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This project is at the University of Pennsylvania. The application process for the 2014 awards is open now.

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