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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Building a University, Part 1 (UCLA & UCSD): How 5 California Schools Approach Campus Design

Building a University, Part 1 (UCLA & UCSD): How 5 California Schools Approach Campus Design | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The key, then, is how a school’s material identity advances its intellectual mission. As with any large institution, one imagines that the building of a university begins with a master plan. However, when the goal is to foster intellectual work and community, the concept of a master plan must be expanded to include distinctly intellectual components. For example, academic buildings often physically symbolize the type of scholarly exploration and research that takes place therein. Administrative centers, on the other hand, anchor the more idealistic work taking place in the lecture and science wings. At the same time, individual buildings can function collectively as didactic forums for the public, demonstrating such principles as energy and water-use efficiencies. Lastly, the circulation between the buildings themselves is important. Open green space, for instance, can accommodate crowds, lectures, and even protests, providing a counterpoint to the more stately, processional routes that crisscross a campus.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

In Metropolis, Sherin Wing begins a series featuring campus planning and planners.The first part focuses on UCLA and UC San Diego and includes insights from SCUPers Jeffrey Averill (UCLA) and Boone Hellmann (UCSD).

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Preserving construction site funds

Preserving construction site funds | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

A Midwestern state university budgeted about $12 million for a major addition to its library several years ago. At the time, there was not a tightly controlled project planning process at the institution and the library’s plaza—already a major central gathering space on campus—was not included in the project budget.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUPer Phillip S. Waite of Utah State University is a major source for this excellent article. His book, A Non-Architect's Guide to Major Capital Projects, is published by SCUP.


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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com

How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses | Wired Business | Wired.com | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

If you’re not the one who’s controlling your learning— you’re not going to learn as well: 


Paloma raised her hand.


“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”


Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.


“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said. …


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Cumberland County College partnership helps unemployed find manufacturing jobs | University Business Magazine

Cumberland County College partnership helps unemployed find manufacturing jobs | University Business Magazine | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The jobs were there, but the skilled workers were not. That’s why Cumberland County College formed a partnership with local industries to train unemployed workers for in-demand manufacturing jobs in the region.
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Trend— Architecture intended to shape behavior

Trend— Architecture intended to shape behavior | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In 1966, a British planner called Maurice Broady came up with a new term for the architectural lexicon: architectural determinism.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
SCUPers continue to learn and share about the planning and design of environments to facilitate and stimulate learning. A similar growth in attention to health care design has an even stronger drive behind it, “because that’s where behavioural changes have life and death consequences.”A recent and related SCUP member resource is the report-out from the first Chapman Prize Award, Research on Learning Space Design: Present State, Future Directions .Tags: Design, Architecture, Learning Environments, Healthcare, Behavior, Facilities Design“Fortunately, there’s a resurgence of belief that buildings can change behaviour, led by a few architectural journals: World Health Design, Environment Behavior and HERD.”This comes after decades of rejection so intense that in 1966 the term architectural determinism was coined to describe the practice of “groundlessly asserting that design solutions would change behavior in a predictable and positive way.”We like this conclusory sentence: “To give architecture back its mojo, a new interest in how architecture changes us must be fostered.”From The Conversation by Jan Golembiewski, Researcher in Environmental Determinants of Mental Health at University of Sydney
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Trend— Labor market analytics informing the education and workforce conversation

Trend— Labor market analytics informing the education and workforce conversation | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Research, information and detailed awareness into skill gaps and labor market demand—could be useful to know.


Sigelman adds a deep insight into the dialogue and the inextricable link between higher education and the economic well-being of New England. His firm, Burning Glass, provides detailed, real-time information about what’s happening in the labor market to educators, policymakers, students and job seekers. It generates this intelligence by collecting and “reading”—using sophisticated text-mining algorithms—tens of millions of online job postings. As a result, the firm’s data support the analysis of emerging skills and the changing job landscape.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Another addition to this great series of interviews, New Directions for Higher Education, from the New England Journal of Higher Education.

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Trend— Measuring the costs to colleges of regulatory compliance

Trend— Measuring the costs to colleges of regulatory compliance | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Many people in higher education complain about the increasing burdens of regulation, with some insisting that it has driven administrative bloat, but the exact toll on colleges remains a mystery. That’s because very few colleges have bothered to measure the cost of compliance in dollars or employee time, because that task is too complicated or too costly in itself.

But it may be time that some colleges tried. "

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Hmm. 


Hartwick College "employees spend about 7,200 hours on compliance reporting, at a cost of about $300,000 to the institution. Just over 100 Hartwick employees and six Aramark contractors working for Hartwick have some role in compliance tasks. In some cases.


'Frankly, some of it we’re doing to ourselves,' president Drugovich said. 'The largest portion of labor hours is not spent on federal regulation, but it is spent on NCAA.'”

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Trend— Tying college and university presidential compensation to performance measures

Trend— Tying college and university presidential compensation to performance measures | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

It’s not just presidents who are being held to performance measures to get bonuses and raises. Nineteen percent of provosts and 18 percent of chief financial officers at private universities and colleges are, too, Yaffe & Company reports. In Texas, the new incentive pay plan includes vice chancellors.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The landscape of higher ed reveals a trend toward higher ed executive, especially presidential,  bonuses tied to measures of performance such as cost savings, growth in research grants, fundraising, graduation rates and more. This resource examines that trend using, as a case study, John O’Donnell, president of Massachusetts Bay Community College.

  • Patrick Callan of National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The process appears to be undertaken “just to justify extravagant salaries, or is way too focused on fundraising. “In other cases, ‘it’s like they put the presidents on trial,’ and every constituency — faculty, donors, students — is invited to weigh in. That’s just a killer. It creates presidents who won’t take risks.’”
  • Dennis P. Jones of  National Center for Higher Education Management (NCHEMS), a frequent SCUP speaker: “It all goes to the idea of putting money behind the goals you’re trying to achieve. If that’s more graduates, let’s pay for graduates. If it’s something else, let’s pay for that.”
  • Stephen Pollack of consulting firm Mercer: “Corporate concepts are just starting to drift into academia, and they have to. Institutions can’t afford not to have competent people in these jobs.”
  • From Community College Daily www.ccdaily.com by Rebecca Trounson/Hechinger Report.
  • Tags: Presidents, Leadership, Resource and Budget Planning, Compensation
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Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's curator insight, January 7, 2014 8:50 PM

I find it kind of troubling that college presidents have there salary partially based on the graduation rates of students. especially since students come and go, but a president can't MAKE them staqy, when someone wants to leave a college they will because it is a descision made by a person, I find this to be important because If I end up going to a college that does this I dont want to be swayed to stay for some other persons salary

 

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Trend— UC Davis's groundbreaking digital badge system could scale well, plays well with regular grading

Trend— UC Davis's groundbreaking digital badge system could scale well, plays well with regular grading | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Sheryl Grant, an expert on badges ... said the badging work done by Normoyle and others at UC-Davis is the most interesting she’s seen in higher education. Grant has helped administer30 badging projects that won a contest and received support from the Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. 


“They really are solving for something that the current credential system is not doing,” says Grant, adding that Normoyle and company are doing so without “upsetting the apple cart” by tossing out the degree.


Grant predicts that UC-Davis’s approach is one other colleges will copy. That’s because, she says, they used a rigorous process to create a badging system grounded in the values of the institution, faculty, students and employers.


The end result, Grant says, is a “data visualization and recommendation system” that is “going to scale really well.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Not everybody is sold on badges, however. One reason is that anyone can award one, raising questions about quality control.

Peter Stokes is executive director of postsecondary innovation in the College of Professional Studies at Northeastern University. He’s supportive of the concept behind badges, and thinks there are no real technical obstacles to making them work. But Stokes remains skeptical of badges having a major impact on higher education, at least for now.


“The big challenge with the badge is to create currency in the market,” Stokes says.

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Trend— Brainlike computers, learning from experience

Trend— Brainlike computers, learning from experience | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

In coming years, the approach will make possible a new generation of artificial intelligence systems that will perform some functions that humans do with ease: see, speak, listen, navigate, manipulate and control. That can hold enormous consequences for tasks like facial and speech recognition, navigation and planning, which are still in elementary stages and rely heavily on human programming.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A harbinger of another wave of transformation.

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The potential of community-based sustainability projects for deep learning initiatives

This paper provides and illustrates a generic framework for deep learning in a Sustainability-based course for higher education instruction. The use of Sustainability Consulting Projects is detailed with potential application to similar programs as part of their Sustainable Education curriculum. Using four disparate institutions of higher learning across the eastern coast of the United States we can complete an exploratory analysis of the framework. This analysis will provide us opportunity to identify and characterize community sustainability projects and their contribution to higher order, integrative and reflective learning. This deep learning framework and model will be helpful to curriculum developers and instructors who wish to introduce these types of projects into their courses and curriculum. These processes and tools may be integrated into current Sustainability Management courses or used as the basis for development of specific courses focused specifically on this topic; e.g., Sustainability Consulting or as a capstone course. Lessons learned and framework design and implementation provide opportunities for further research and development of these courses.


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

From the conclusion: "The cases from four universities and 85 projects also provided a number of lessons learned with direct implications for practice and research." This paper—and the accompanying themed issue, "Higher Education for Sustainable Development: Emerging Areas" of the Journal of Cleaner Production—is of interest.

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Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Notes? – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Notes? – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

“I can’t read my own handwriting,” the young woman explained. “It’s best if I take a picture of your writing so I can understand the notes.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Taking a picture does indeed record the information, but it omits some of the necessary mental engagement that taking notes employs. So can the two be equally effective?


The answer to that question is difficult to gauge, and short of hooking up students to electrodes and monitoring their brain waves as they take pictures or write notes, I’m not sure how to measure the neurological efficacy of either method. For now, I allow students to take notes however they see fit—handwritten, typed, voice-recorded, or photographed—because I figure that some notes, no matter the method of documentation, are better than none.

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Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All

Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Hampton found that, rather than isolating people, technology made them more connected. “It turns out the wired folk — they recognized like three times as many of their neighbors when asked,” Hampton said. Not only that, he said, they spoke with neighbors on the phone five times as often and attended more community events. Altogether, they were much more successful at addressing local problems, like speeding cars and a small spate of burglaries.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting.

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Webinar— Exploring common spaces

Webinar— Exploring common spaces | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

On Tuesday, January 21 (3:30 - 5:00 p.m.) , the Learning Spaces Collaboratory presents the first in series of four webinars focusing on the campus as an ecosystem of learning spaces--beginning with attention to common spaces, defined as spaces that are agile and flexible enough to accommodate learners in groups large and small, before, after, and sometimes during scheduled class periods; those welcoming and transparent enough to shape a community of learners; spaces giving students authority to own their learning, their spaces for learning.   

 
Questions to be addressed:  What role do common spaces have in the ecosystem of learning spaces?  What role do they play in nurturing robust learning communities? What is a "common" space intended to do, to be [what is their job description]? What impact do such spaces have on 21st century learners?  How do we know?

The webinar will be moderated by Jeanne L. Narum (LSC) and facilitated by:
  • Meredith Bostwick-Lorenzo Eiroa, Associate Director – Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP
  • Kent Duffy, Principal - SRG Partnership, Inc.
  • Keith Sawyer, Morgan Distinguished Professor in Educational Innovations - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Susan Whitmer, Research Lead, Education – Herman Miller
  • Joe M. Williams, Director of Public Services, University Library – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Cathy M. Wolfe, Director of Campus Planning – George Mason University
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Also from the LSC, its new guide (pdf, free) is a must-download for SCUPers and anyone else with an interest in learning environments: Planning for Assessing 21st Century Spaces for 21st Century Learners.

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Trend— Tying college and university president compensation to performance measures

Trend— Tying college and university president compensation to performance measures | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The landscape of higher ed reveals a trend toward higher ed executive, especially presidential, bonuses tied to measures of performance such as cost savings, growth in research grants, fundraising, graduation rates and more. This resource examines that trend using, as a case study, John O’Donnell, president of Massachusetts Bay Community College.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
A recent and related SCUP member resource is “Succession Planning: The Key to Ensuring Leadership” (members: direct-download download pdf now; nonmembers: Get the report here)Tags: Presidents, Leadership, Resource and Budget Planning, CompensationPatrick Callan of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The process appears to be undertaken “just to justify extravagant salaries, or is way too focused on fundraising. “In other cases, ‘it’s like they put the presidents on trial,’ and every constituency — faculty, donors, students — is invited to weigh in. That’s just a killer. It creates presidents who won’t take risks.’”Dennis P. Jones of the National Center for Higher Education Management (NCHEMS), a frequent SCUP speaker: “It all goes to the idea of putting money behind the goals you’re trying to achieve. If that’s more graduates, let’s pay for graduates. If it’s something else, let’s pay for that.”Stephen Pollack of the consulting firm Mercer: “Corporate concepts are just starting to drift into academia, and they have to. Institutions can’t afford not to have competent people in these jobs.”From Community College Daily www.ccdaily.com by Rebecca Trounson/Hechinger Report.
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Trend— Integrated and complicated inter-institutional and inter-agency planning

Trend— Integrated and complicated inter-institutional and inter-agency planning | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Far western Kentucky needed an engineering education to fulfill demand and attract business. Fifteen years of planning and implementation led to success: “This is a very unique operation. It’s probably the only place in the United States where there’s a tripartite arrangement between a community college, a university and a flagship university that delivers engineering education. People were skeptical that it could be done, but I was convinced it would work because of the level of commitment here.”
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
Tags: Collaboration, Integrated Planning, Change Management, Partnering, Regional Development, Community CollegesWilliam Murphy, founding director of the UK College of Engineering at the Paducah campus: “‘Sometimes people just have geographic limitations and we have to take the education to them. I think many of those nearly 200 graduates we have had fall into that category,’ he said. ‘We have tried to turn all of them into successful engineers, because there’s always a position out there that they can be successful in.’”“In addition to determining how the program would be offered in Paducah, officials needed a place to house the program, which meant building a new facility on the community college campus. More than $8.4 million was raised—entirely through private donations in Paducah—for the construction of a 53,000-square-foot science and engineering building on the WKCTC campus. The faculty and staff from UK, MSU and WKCTC share offices and classroom space in the three-story building.”There are “more than 170 students currently enrolled in Paducah’s engineering program, said David Silverstein, director of the UK College of Engineering Paducah campus. As important as the program has been to the region, it has been just as important to the individual graduates, he said. About 75 percent of the nearly 200 graduates of the program have found engineering jobs in their communities.”
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Concept— Comparing your institution’s strategies to those used by an art museum curator

Titled, "Curating the Campus":


As with any exhibition, unifying elements, when emphasized, provide greater understanding of the whole. For higher education strategic planning, those elements can be grouped into the "salient six" themes that articulate and address today's challenges:

  • Academic excellence.
  • Affordability and access.
  • Globalization and internationalization (including diversity and inclusion).
  • Sustainability.
  • Civic engagement.
  • Place-based distinction.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

An ACE Fellow studies the strategic planning processes of 60 institutions, finding "six salient themes" which will resonate with most SCUPers. SCUP members contributed to the research: "The six salient themes identified in "Curating the Campus" were also informed by panel discussions, lectures, and working groups held at the NACUBO, EDUCAUSE, SCUP, AAC&U, and COPLAC national conferences."

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Aliah Therese's curator insight, April 3, 2016 10:01 AM
An ACE Fellow studies the strategic planning processes of 60 institutions, finding "six salient themes" which will resonate with most SCUPers. SCUP members contributed to the research: "The six salient themes identified in "Curating the Campus" were also informed by panel discussions, lectures, and working groups held at the NACUBO, EDUCAUSE, SCUP, AAC&U, and COPLAC national conferences."

An ACE Fellow studies the strategic planning processes of 60 institutions, finding "six salient themes" which will resonate with most SCUPers. SCUP members contributed to the research: "The six salient themes identified in "Curating the Campus" were also informed by panel discussions, lectures, and working groups held at the NACUBO, EDUCAUSE, SCUP, AAC&U, and COPLAC national conferences."

 
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Trend— Give more undergrads the attention 'lavished on students at elite institutions'

Six years ago, CUNY decided to confront the high dropout rate at its community colleges with the ASAP initiative. The results are stunning: 56 percent of the first two cohorts of more than 1,500 students have graduated, compared with just 23 percent of a comparable group that didn’t have the same experience. What’s more, most of those graduates are currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Over the past month, CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) has garnered hosannas in the media for its package of comprehensive financial resources, student support systems and impressive graduation rates. The social policy leader MDRC is conducting a multiyear random-assignment study of ASAP and, in a just-released report, describes it as “unparalleled in large-scale experimental evaluations of programs in higher education to date.”


Tags: Students, Retention, Student Services, North Atlantic, NY, Community Colleges

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Julianne Caust's comment, August 25, 2014 8:15 PM
I have just had a glance at this article, I haven't actually read it in full yet, has anyone else?
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A different kind of deferred maintenance? Born Digital, Projects Need Attention to Survive

A different kind of deferred maintenance? Born Digital, Projects Need Attention to Survive | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
For one, they may require continuing maintenance to remain useful and accessible.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Build the costs into the planning?

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Achieve Your Goals in 2014 -- Here's Research That Can Help

Achieve Your Goals in 2014 -- Here's Research That Can Help | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

1. Successful people do nine things differently than everyone else.

2. The rest of us hold ourselves back in five major ways.

3. But don’t stress! Just change the way you think about stress.

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2013— The 'year that online education fell back to earth'?

2013— The 'year that online education fell back to earth'? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

In theory, students saddled by rising debt and unable to tap into the best schools would be able to take free classes from rock star professors at elite schools via Udacity, edX, Coursera and other MOOC platforms.


But if 2012 was the "Year of the MOOC," as The New York Times famously called it, 2013 might be dubbed the year that online education fell back to earth. Faculty at several institutions rebelled against the rapid expansion of online learning — and the nation's largest MOOC providers are responding.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

During the holidays, Eric Westervelt covered the year in online education quite well. Sebastian Thrun: "Online education that leaves almost everybody behind except for highly motivated students, to me, can't be a viable path to education. We look back at our early work and realize it wasn't quite as good as it should have been. We had so many moments for improvement."

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A New Reality— Higher-education lobbyists keep expectations low for 2014

A New Reality— Higher-education lobbyists keep expectations low for 2014 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

As legislative sessions begin anew, flat budgets and institutional accountability will dominate the discussion.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Eric Kelderman writes that "a new reality has set in about what [can be expected] from state" budgets.

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Discussing design models for hybrid/blended learning and the impact on the campus

Discussing design models for hybrid/blended learning and the impact on the campus | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The comments section has many good faculty POVs.:


So we did a little brainstorming. Here are some of things that were suggested in the very short time available (10 minutes or so):

Online

  • foundational knowledge (facts, principles, concepts, ideas, vocabulary, etc.)
  • certain kinds of skills such as knowledge management, knowledge navigation, independent learning, creative writing
  • some elements of clinical practice (e.g. correct procedures, video demonstrations of equipment being used, patient symptoms)

Face-to-face

  • public speaking and facilitation skills
  • consensus-building
  • decision-making
  • problem solving
  • building a closer relationship with/’humanising’ the instructor
  • body language cues from the instructor about what is really important to him/her in the course
  • practical lab skills/operating equipment
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This post by former SCUP plenary speaker Tony Bates received the 2013 Downes Prize for online learning & distance education resources. SCUPers will find it insightful and practical. At the Downes Prize link there are a number of worthwhile runners-up.

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