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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Content Licensing Creates 'Existential Crisis' for Libraries

Content Licensing Creates 'Existential Crisis' for Libraries | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Old-fashioned media—books, tapes, CDs, etc.—are governed by the first-sale doctrine, a legal provision that allows a buyer to do whatever she wants with a copy.


The licensing of digital media, however, gives publishers far more power. Instead of selling an album outright, they can sell permission to access its contents for a fixed amount of time. (This is a boon for textbook publishers in particular. Under a digital regime, they may not have to worry about losing sales to students buying used copies.)


The licensing model stands to become the norm as physical media get phased out, says Mr. Hoek. “This isn’t just a music problem,” he says. Anything made of “ones and zeroes” can be kept on a leash.


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Even as SCUP takes a deep, hard look at how it licenses its knowledge content, that kind of deep, hard look by publishers is worrying college and university librarians:


As more and more books, videos, and sound recordings are licensed and distributed through online-only means, the amount of materials available for libraries to collect is shrinking.


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Who's writing the higher ed board of trustees member algorithm?

Who's writing the higher ed board of trustees member algorithm? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The program (algorithm) will be the sixth member of DKV's board."


[T]he program, called VITAL, can make investment recommendations about life sciences firms by poring over large amounts of data.


Just like other members of the board, the algorithm gets to vote on whether the firm makes an investment in a specific company or not. The program will be the sixth member of DKV's board."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

So ... who's writing the higher ed board of trustees member algorithm?   :D  @AGBtweets #SCUP would like to recommend an integrative approach to environmental scanning and planning through change.

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'We should count ourselves lucky that Amazon (and Google and Apple and Microsoft etc.) don’t seem to be prioritizing higher ed'

"There is little evidence that companies, particularly tech companies, have done much of anything positive to advance learning. How much money has been diverted to buying hardware or software that could have been spent directly on educators and students?"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"They understand that most of the people living in emerging economies will need to leapfrog past the traditional campus based system."

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The Most Transformative Invention Since the iPad | Oculus Rift

The Most Transformative Invention Since the iPad | Oculus Rift | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
I had been prepared to be skeptical of the much-anticipated virtual reality goggles—WIRED has been proclaiming the revolutionary arrival of VR for two decades, and it had come to seem as laughable as Knight-Ridder’s video. Then I tried the Rift on. It was like the moment when I first held the iPad.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Planners, what happens when every student has a pair of these, in five years?


[A]n amazing transition happened as my eyes resolved a new field of vision. I blinked, and while my brain remembered (for a moment) that I was sitting in my office, my eyes told me I was somewhere completely different. And then, in an instant, my brain joined my eyes, and I was there. It was seamless, and it was crazy.

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Hacking the University: A Future Tense Event Recap

Hacking the University: A Future Tense Event Recap | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Even Socrates was skeptical of technology in higher education—he worried about the effect that a newfangled thing called writing would have on learning. According to Kevin Carey, director of the New America Foundation’s Education Policy Program, Socrates thought that the written word was the enemy of memory for students. In...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUP–49 plenary speaker, Jeff Selingo, "said, this time it’s different. Besides the threat of technology infringing on their turf, 75 percent of colleges today have flat or declining revenue. They’ve become mini-cities, trying to do a lot for a lot of people, but the model has become too expensive for both the institutions and the students—a fact that many colleges have yet to contend with.


Universities are slow to recognize that people go to college for different reasons, Selingo said—whether as a coming of age marker, in pursuit of a career, or, of course, midlifers seeking a career change. Technology startups, however, are unbundling these different purposes and focusing on one or two buckets of higher education consumers. And, he added, smart institutions will likely end up doing the same."

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What’s the Key to Successful Tech Management?

What’s the Key to Successful Tech Management? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In, What's the Key to Successful Tech Management,  SCUP–49 plenary speaker Clay Shirky looks at the planning, project management, and crisis management of the…
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"On a major new tech project, you can’t really understand the challenges involved until you start trying to build it."

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ROBOTS! (and artificial intelligence)

ROBOTS! (and artificial intelligence) | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A special theme hour - starring a computer competing against a comedian for laughs, the Army's recruitment chatbot, and Google crushing on robots.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A must-listen or must-read.

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Community colleges continue growth in online classes but join general move away from MOOCs

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A nice report from the Instructional Technology Council from a survey of its membership.

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ELI 2014: MOOCs and MOOC Research (with images, tweets) · kreshleman

From sessions on MOOCs and MOOC research...biggest takeaway for me is that MOOCs are moving away from disruption toward another tool in the toolkit of ed tech in higher ed.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Awesome technology turns tweets from the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative meeting into a slide show of volunteer reporting-out. It's not a replacement for being there, of course, but we weren't  :(


We especially like slide 12.


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Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All

Technology Is Not Driving Us Apart After All | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Hampton found that, rather than isolating people, technology made them more connected. “It turns out the wired folk — they recognized like three times as many of their neighbors when asked,” Hampton said. Not only that, he said, they spoke with neighbors on the phone five times as often and attended more community events. Altogether, they were much more successful at addressing local problems, like speeding cars and a small spate of burglaries.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting.

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Old Cellphones, Once Bound for Landfills, Now Bring Colleges Money

College officials often face logistical and philosophical dilemmas in disposing of cast-off cellphones, tablets, computers, and printers.


“At a lot of universities—unless they have a centralized program in place or some sort of waste-management policy through their facilities department—it is really challenging to be able to recycle just about anything,” says Jennifer Sellers, sustainability coordinator at Coastal Carolina University, in Conway, S.C., and a veteran professional in the recycling and waste-management industry. “It is enough just to get people to throw trash in the trash can, especially when things get hectic.”


Now a recycling company based in Erie, Pa., has started a nationwide program in which it pays colleges for spent ink and toner cartridges and small electronics, diverting devices away from landfills and into the $20-billion-a-year electronics-recycling market.

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Mar Bank's curator insight, August 28, 2013 12:20 PM

STARTING New, $ 1,000,000,000,000,000 ( one quadrillion ) Company, need $100,000,000 for new and great inventions and Partners.

Write to:
twitter.com/MarBank1

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Ex-Googler Creates Slick Kit to Turn Your Kid’s iPad Into a Teacher

Ex-Googler Creates Slick Kit to Turn Your Kid’s iPad Into a Teacher | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Many parents lament the amount of time their children spend glued to iPads, but instead of reaching for the parental controls, ex-Google engineer Pramod Sharma figured out how to harness its addictive powers as an educational tool. The result, called Osmo, uses the iPad’s cameras and display to turn any kitchen table into an interactive learning lab. ... Osmo uses letter tiles, colored blocks, random dinosaur action figures, and even a kid’s stick figure drawings as video game controllers when placed in the camera’s field of view. Osmo’s sophisticated vision systems recognizes the objects and uses them to trigger animations and effects on screen. Now, with over a million dollars in pre-orders, Osmo is on its way to market just in time for the Christmas season and Sharma is sharing background on the design process."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

So, just how are we planning for higher education? What will "higher ed" look like when these kids turn 18 in, what, 2028? 

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The Most Popular Social Network for Young People? Texting

The Most Popular Social Network for Young People? Texting | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Yes, it's a social network. Also: Just a third of high school seniors place a call each day, and more teens report using Pandora than Instagram or Snapchat.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

For young people,

Facebook is the newspaper,

and websites are the authors.


"2. Websites are much smaller than social networks. If you're confused why digital publishers obsess over Facebook and social media, make this graph your smartphone wallpaper. Even the most popular site among teens—BuzzFeed—has fewer daily visitors than any network or app in the graph. (Even Beats, which is considered a tiny music service, has more daily users than any website in the survey.) Seventy three percent of teens don't read BuzzFeed, 84 percent don't read Reddit, and 96 percent don't read Mashable or Gawker. For young people, Facebook is the newspaper, and websites are the authors."

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Professor Write's curator insight, June 26, 2014 1:06 AM

Goes to show, we are moving to a more visual world. What place for literacy then? www.professorwrite.com

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'I don't see how we can survive if we continue to duplicate multimillion-dollar capital projects when they can be scaled to another location'

'I don't see how we can survive if we continue to duplicate multimillion-dollar capital projects when they can be scaled to another location' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

""'f I had a crystal ball and could look 10 years down the road, I would say that many small- and medium-sized universities will move their computer centers to the cloud, allowing vendors to perform basic operations, including disaster recovery, security, backup, patches, fixes, and updates,' predicts Roger V. Bruszewski, vice president for finance and administration, Millersville University, Millersville, Pennsylvania. 'The universities will focus attention and resources on providing services to the front-end user.'


He explains that his institution's financial and HR systems are already housed in a private cloud with 13 other institutions and that student and advancement systems will soon join them. 'I see us slowly scaling down our back-office operations,' he says. 'The economics of higher education are driving us to a lower common denominator. I don't see how we can survive if we continue to duplicate multimillion-dollar capital projects when they can be scaled to another location.'"

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Business School, Disrupted

Business School, Disrupted | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In moving into online education, Harvard Business School discovered that it isn’t so easy to practice what it teaches.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Intriguing, with twists. One of the best articles we've read in a while that has, as its background, what's on-the-gound-happening at the leading edge.


“Harvard is going to make a lot of money,” Mr. Ulrich predicted. “They will sell a lot of seats at those courses. But those seats are very carefully designed to be off to the side. It’s designed to be not at all threatening to what they’re doing at the core of the business school.”

Exactly, warned Professor Christensen, who said he was not consulted about the project. “What they’re doing is, in my language, a sustaining innovation,” akin to Kodak introducing better film, circa 2005. “It’s not truly disruptive.”

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10 New Breakthrough Technologies 2014 | MIT Technology Review

10 New Breakthrough Technologies 2014 | MIT Technology Review | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Many implications for college and university planning. It tales integrated planning to handle these rapid and widespread changes.

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MOOCs - A Tsunami of Promises

MOOCs - A Tsunami of Promises | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The prediction was that MOOCs will completely change the game in higher education. Enthusiasm was general - and groupthink so tempting - that many universities across the world adopted them as a pa...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting point:


The solution to deliver good quality higher learning to all enlightened the imagination of many. The narrative was fantastic: the door to what Time called “High-End Learning on the Cheap” was discovered and new startups and venture capitalists were there to fight to open it for the benefit of the poor around the world. Thomas Friedman argued in 2012 that “nothing has more potential to lift more people out of poverty” than Silicon Valley solutions and MOOCs will “unlock a billion more brains to solve the world’s biggest problems“.


There is no doubt that rising inequality is a huge problem for the world. This is why is important to remember here that Silicon Valley makes San Francisco one of the most unequal cities in the US. The fact is that the Silicon Valley solution is not working at home, and American politicians make public calls to find answers. A set of important questions should be raised about any set of solutions coming from the same place where education for all or homelessness stay unaddressed and are on the rise (The Guardian reports that in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley “92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind“).

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When It Comes to the Future of Higher Ed and Tech, Don’t Forget Small State Schools

When It Comes to the Future of Higher Ed and Tech, Don’t Forget Small State Schools | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
This article is part of Future Tense, which is a partnership of Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State University. On Wednesday, April 30, Future Tense will host an event in Washington, D.C., on technology and the future of higher education. For more information and to RSVP, visit the...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUPer Paula Krebs,  dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Bridgewater State University in southeastern Massachusetts, writes frequently on U.S. higher education issues. "Making a commitment to offering students the tech they need will require campuswide change. A concomitant investment in faculty would mean training and development of instructors who are in it for the long haul—permanent full-time faculty. Institutions that create full-time positions and offer opportunities for new faculty members to keep up with the latest digital developments will see great rewards in student success.

The biggest change will have to be in administrator and faculty mindset, not in campus hardware."

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The Technology Disruptions of Today

The Technology Disruptions of Today | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Tech columnist David Pogue addresses how disruptive technology is changing our lives at the CoSN conference. ...


Moving on to students, Pogue reinforced what most educators already know: Communication has to be made in real time through social media and texting. Many students don't use the traditional forms of communications that adults do, such as email and landline phones."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A series of informative tweets: "He touched on student data privacy as well. When the requested data is anonymous and in aggregate form, students don't mind providing it to receive a service, such as traffic patterns on a map. But they draw the line when someone gathers data attached to their name."

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Hope's curator insight, July 8, 2014 9:46 PM

Hope Williams Insight:

Roscorla, Tanya. "The Technology Disruptions of Today." 21 March 2014.Web

http://www.centerdigitaled.com/news/Technology-Disruptions.html

This article Tanya is explaining that in the past couple years technology has out done itself. Technology is becoming life. Now you can be able to use cars without even driving them yourself, can set your house alarm from your car, and translate your words on your screen. Technology is not a bad thing- it can be bad with the wrong people, but technology itself is very important. It's changing the world day by day and people need to get use to it because technology is just going to continue to improve as the years go by. She also sends messages through twitter to send her thoughts on what she thinks about technology.

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Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Notes? – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Notes? – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

“I can’t read my own handwriting,” the young woman explained. “It’s best if I take a picture of your writing so I can understand the notes.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Taking a picture does indeed record the information, but it omits some of the necessary mental engagement that taking notes employs. So can the two be equally effective?


The answer to that question is difficult to gauge, and short of hooking up students to electrodes and monitoring their brain waves as they take pictures or write notes, I’m not sure how to measure the neurological efficacy of either method. For now, I allow students to take notes however they see fit—handwritten, typed, voice-recorded, or photographed—because I figure that some notes, no matter the method of documentation, are better than none.

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new book— The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World: Howard Gardner, Katie Davis

The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World [Howard Gardner, Katie Davis] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We're reading this.

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