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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Textbook Companies Are Now Teaching College Classes

Textbook Companies Are Now Teaching College Classes | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
This summer, Chad Mason signed up for online general psychology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. This spring, Jonathan Serrano took intro to psychology online at Essex County College in Newark, New Jersey. Though the two undergraduates were separated by more than 600 miles, enrolled in different institutions,...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"In theory, many of [publisher] courses could easily act as stand-alone products," replacing university courses.


Derived from this: "It’s sensitive terrain for the publishers as well. In theory, many of their courses could easily act as stand-alone products they could sell directly to students who need to fill a social science or math requirement. Pearson PLC could become Pearson U. But the publishers don’t have college accreditation. They need the colleges to turn a course into something that can count toward a degree, and they don’t want to undercut their main market."

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Planning for Disruption | 'Modularity is overtaking interdependent architectures.'

Planning for Disruption | 'Modularity is overtaking interdependent architectures.' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Harvard Business School Professor Clay Christensen spoke about disruption in higher ed as a keynote speaker at the Harvard IT Summit.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"'Modularity is overtaking interdependent architectures.'


Christensen made a connection between higher ed today and the reign of mainframe computing. 'At the time of the mainframes, the proprietary architecture mattered most and the components were secondary. Everybody knew IBM and Digital, but not the maker of their components. The PC’s arrival flipped all that, and the component makers like Intel then became more important.'


He continued, 'Harvard will still have its unique architecture, but the courses are becoming modular, like PC components. The brand [recognition] could move away from the universities to the courses.'


With more ways to access learning, a difficult question looms: 'Is this [transformation] a threat or an opportunity for Harvard?' There was a long silence after Christensen posed the question.


Finally, [Harvard President] Margulies, sitting in the front row, answered.


'It’s both,' she said."

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'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.'

'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Love this.


"It wasn't our intent, I just want to be clear about that now, it was not our intent to destroy universities. That's not why we did it. We want to change universities, and we want them to work for the better.

Thinking in Models: for Design, for Learning…

A large part of this talk is about that change. It's interesting. We go from the first slide about people wanting to be relevant, wanting universities to be relevant, all the way to the last slide about what's going to replace universities, without doing all the thinking that we need to do in between. We need to do this thinking in between.

Let's begin our thinking with where the current trends, we're told, are going. We're told there will be tiered service models at universities. We're told there will be analytics and data-driven management. We're told there will be alternative credentials. To a certain degree, all of these three things are true.

To a certain degree, none of these three things are going to work themselves out in the way that the economist or economists or education reformers predict. When you look at that, basically it's like they have this model or design in their head of how we could rebuild the university system, wipe it all out, start over, and we'll have a new model.




Figure 1 - workflow process employed to assist LMS selection

This model of accountability and cost frameworks and all of that will solve all the problems that the current system has. Models are popular in education too. Here's a model (Figure 1) of a workflow-processed employee to assist LMS selection. You can't really read the small writing there. It goes from enrollment to program administration to learner interactions to content creation to assessment.

It's a fishbone diagram. If you're in economics or business, you're probably familiar with it.Models of how to select educational technology including customized lists of LMS features, a way of picking among those 305 features of a learning management system that you might want to solve the educational problems at your institution."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

You really need to read this. Or at least skim it. This is not your ordinary POV. "I criticize Coursera. I criticize the Stanford MOOCs and all of that, but when Norvig and Thrun launched their artificial intelligence MOOC, in the first week, 150,000 people signed up. Overall, I think it was something like 250,000 people signed up for one course, a really hard course that's really difficult to understand, in artificial intelligence.


Forget the fact that a lot of them dropped out. A lot of them didn't. Tens of thousands finished. This, by itself, indicates that the old model wasn't working. There was such a pent-up demand for upper-level university courses in artificial intelligence that, when one was finally made available, people knocked down the doors trying to get to it."

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Ex-Googler Creates Slick Kit to Turn Your Kid’s iPad Into a Teacher

Ex-Googler Creates Slick Kit to Turn Your Kid’s iPad Into a Teacher | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Many parents lament the amount of time their children spend glued to iPads, but instead of reaching for the parental controls, ex-Google engineer Pramod Sharma figured out how to harness its addictive powers as an educational tool. The result, called Osmo, uses the iPad’s cameras and display to turn any kitchen table into an interactive learning lab. ... Osmo uses letter tiles, colored blocks, random dinosaur action figures, and even a kid’s stick figure drawings as video game controllers when placed in the camera’s field of view. Osmo’s sophisticated vision systems recognizes the objects and uses them to trigger animations and effects on screen. Now, with over a million dollars in pre-orders, Osmo is on its way to market just in time for the Christmas season and Sharma is sharing background on the design process."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

So, just how are we planning for higher education? What will "higher ed" look like when these kids turn 18 in, what, 2028? 

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Trends— Why Not a Three-Day Work Week?

Trends— Why Not a Three-Day Work Week? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

One of the world's richest men, Carlos Slim, recently "proposed that the standard work schedule worldwide should be trimmed to three days a week. The current arrangement, he pointed out, was developed when life expectancy was lower and the world was, as a whole, poorer. Now, with people living longer and the structure of society shifting accordingly, a four-day weekend would improve quality of life, promote the development of other occupations, and healthier and more productive employees. Slim’s proposal included two important caveats: employees would work longer hours each day, and would continue to work into their seventies. (At Slim’s own company, Telmex, he is allowing workers past retirement age to keep working four-day weeks, at full salary.)"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Something's got to give. There aren't enough jobs.

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An Look at Adjunct Leaders' Views on Long-term Strategies

"Concordia adjuncts have strategically sought over time to 'permeate' the university’s governance structure, and serve – with compensation – on committees of all kinds, including hiring committees. That visibility has bred respect from the administration, she said, which is demonstrated by contract wins such as a $240,000 professional development fund specifically for part-time faculty."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Reporting from the Coalition of Contingent Academic Labor conference. There are a number of trends there which parallel or interact with other disruption/transformation trends with regard to faculty roles over time. For example, if you cannot deny the growing role of adjuncts, then why not invest in ensuring they are the best and have the resources to do their jobs well? Why not look at what else they can do, or what they will be doing?

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Is There a There There? Online Education and the Future of the Campus

Is There a There There? Online Education and the Future of the Campus | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A Planning Interview with the author of Is There a There There? Online Education and ArchitectureX, from Planning for Higher Education, v42n3 April--May 20...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Live today at 10 am Eastern.

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The Most Popular Social Network for Young People? Texting

The Most Popular Social Network for Young People? Texting | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Yes, it's a social network. Also: Just a third of high school seniors place a call each day, and more teens report using Pandora than Instagram or Snapchat.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

For young people,

Facebook is the newspaper,

and websites are the authors.


"2. Websites are much smaller than social networks. If you're confused why digital publishers obsess over Facebook and social media, make this graph your smartphone wallpaper. Even the most popular site among teens—BuzzFeed—has fewer daily visitors than any network or app in the graph. (Even Beats, which is considered a tiny music service, has more daily users than any website in the survey.) Seventy three percent of teens don't read BuzzFeed, 84 percent don't read Reddit, and 96 percent don't read Mashable or Gawker. For young people, Facebook is the newspaper, and websites are the authors."

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Professor Write's curator insight, June 26, 2014 1:06 AM

Goes to show, we are moving to a more visual world. What place for literacy then? www.professorwrite.com

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The Next America: ... the Looming Generational Showdown | Three POVs from SCUP

Three authors for the journal Planning for Higher Education share their takes on Paul Taylor's book. Taylor will be at higher education's premier planning ev...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

As always, it was a great conversation, with much emphasis on faculty change.

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Machines v. Lawyers by John O. McGinnis, City Journal Spring 2014

Machines v. Lawyers by John O. McGinnis, City Journal Spring 2014 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
As information technology advances, the legal profession faces a great disruption.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The growing role of machine intelligence will create new competition in the legal profession and reduce the incomes of many lawyers. The job category that the Bureau of Labor Statistics calls “other legal services”—which includes the use of technology to help perform legal tasks—has already been surging, over 7 percent per year from 1999 to 2010. As a consequence, the law-school crisis will deepen, forcing some schools to close and others to reduce tuitions. While lawyers and law professors may mourn the loss of more lucrative professional opportunities, consumers of modest means will enjoy access to previously cost-prohibitive services.

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Five SCUPers Take on "The Next America" Book • today at 2 pm Eastern

Five SCUPers Take on "The Next America" Book • today at 2 pm Eastern | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Watch a live video hangout with five SCUPers, each of who is reviewing Paul Taylor's new book, A Demographic Look at the Near Future: The Next America."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Each has read the book and has taken their own view on its contents and what the changing demographics mean for higher education. 

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Three university academics debate the future of higher education in light of massive open online courses.

Three university academics debate the future of higher education in light of massive open online courses. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The Wall Street Journal: Do you foresee a day when MOOCs will replace classroom learning?


SCUP–49 Plenary Speaker, Clay Shirky: No, I don't.


The places that do high-touch education well, the Oberlins and Reeds of the world, will be just fine. The places that are just using classrooms to deliver content in a low-touch way will suffer some displacement. But far and away the most important effect of online education will be to bring in people who aren't part of the current educational system at all, from people with degrees and jobs using them for retraining (which we already see a lot of) to people who could never have afforded an M.S. in computer science now [being] able to get one from Georgia Tech for less than $7,000.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Not the greatest question, actually. But some good responses.

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Organic IT, whither

Organic IT, whither | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"'If I had a crystal ball and could look 10 years down the road, I would say that many small- and medium-sized universities will move their computer centers to the cloud, allowing vendors to perform basic operations, including disaster recovery, security, backup, patches, fixes, and updates,' predicts Roger V. Bruszewski, vice president for finance and administration, Millersville University, Millersville, Pennsylvania. 'The universities will focus attention and resources on providing services to the front-end user.'" 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

From Business Officer. Subtitled, Like a healthy root system, your administrative technology can support a flourishing institution, if you prune away inefficient processes and nurture the best use of resources."


If this interests you, you may be interested in Integrated Resource and Budget Planning at Colleges and Universities, the work product of SCUP's Resource and Budget Planning Task Force.

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Places of Higher Learning Expand Up, Not Out

Places of Higher Learning Expand Up, Not Out | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Two-storey addition on top of Thompson Rivers University building gives B.C. law school sweeping style and space
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Using some additional examples, this also explores the growth in "vertical campuses," in Canada.

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The 2018 Mindset List | 'Their collection of U.S. quarters has always celebrated the individual states.'

"1. During their initial weeks of kindergarten, they were upset by endlessly repeated images of planes blasting into the World Trade Center. ...

13. Women have always attended the Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel. ...

22. Students have always been able to dance at Baylor."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We wait for this every year. This descrbes the world our incoming freshman class has lived their entire lives in.

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Content Licensing Creates 'Existential Crisis' for Libraries

Content Licensing Creates 'Existential Crisis' for Libraries | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Old-fashioned media—books, tapes, CDs, etc.—are governed by the first-sale doctrine, a legal provision that allows a buyer to do whatever she wants with a copy.


The licensing of digital media, however, gives publishers far more power. Instead of selling an album outright, they can sell permission to access its contents for a fixed amount of time. (This is a boon for textbook publishers in particular. Under a digital regime, they may not have to worry about losing sales to students buying used copies.)


The licensing model stands to become the norm as physical media get phased out, says Mr. Hoek. “This isn’t just a music problem,” he says. Anything made of “ones and zeroes” can be kept on a leash.


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Even as SCUP takes a deep, hard look at how it licenses its knowledge content, that kind of deep, hard look by publishers is worrying college and university librarians:


As more and more books, videos, and sound recordings are licensed and distributed through online-only means, the amount of materials available for libraries to collect is shrinking.


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MIT Wristband Could Make AC Obsolete?

MIT Wristband Could Make AC Obsolete? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A team of students at MIT is working on a prototype wearable that asks one important question: Why heat or cool a building when you could heat or cool a person?
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Good question. This is especially promising for attending professional conferences. But, seriously, what if individuals could control their own perceptions of being hot or cold, with mush less regard to the microenvironment they are in? How would this change AEC? Design? Learning?

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Yes, Master’s: A Graduate Degree’s Moment in the Age of Higher Education Innovation

Yes, Master’s: A Graduate Degree’s Moment in the Age of Higher Education Innovation | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Therefore, to truly enable economic mobility in our society, we must acknowledge the master’s degree’s growing role as employers’ preferred or required educational qualification for many middle and professional-class jobs. Furthermore, in addition to the economic benefits of master’s-level education to individuals and employers, researchers have illustrated that greater levels of educational attainment are associated with higher levels of societal and community engagement and well-being."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The author, Sean Gallagher, is chief strategy officer at Northeastern University. Does an evolved Master's degree have a stronger role to play in the future of some higher ed institutions?

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Kelly Brenner Smith's curator insight, August 8, 2014 10:39 PM

Just something to think about when planning your educational journey ....

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MOOC U: Who Is Getting the Most Out of Online Education and Why eBook: Jeffrey J. Selingo

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A short, new, not-yet-published piece on sale in advance of publication—from our well-received #scup49 plenary speaker, Jeff Selingo.

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Who's writing the higher ed board of trustees member algorithm?

Who's writing the higher ed board of trustees member algorithm? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The program (algorithm) will be the sixth member of DKV's board."


[T]he program, called VITAL, can make investment recommendations about life sciences firms by poring over large amounts of data.


Just like other members of the board, the algorithm gets to vote on whether the firm makes an investment in a specific company or not. The program will be the sixth member of DKV's board."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

So ... who's writing the higher ed board of trustees member algorithm?   :D  @AGBtweets #SCUP would like to recommend an integrative approach to environmental scanning and planning through change.

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The Next America: ... the Looming Generational Showdown | Three POVs from Higher Ed - YouTube

Three authors for the journal Planning for Higher Education share their takes on Paul Taylor's book. Taylor will be at higher education's premier planning event, "Plan for Transformation in Higher Education," in Pittsburgh, July 12–16:

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Our guests for this video Planning Interview were SCUPers Linda Baer, Marie Gardner, and James Morisson.

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New Directions for Higher Education: Q&A with Education Scholar Adrianna Kezar on the Changing Faculty

New Directions for Higher Education: Q&A with Education Scholar Adrianna Kezar on the Changing Faculty | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"DiSalvio: Full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty were once the norm in higher education. However, the numbers and proportions of non-tenure track faculty as a segment of the professoriate has crept higher over the past decade and adjunct faculty now make up the majority of the higher education workforce. Does this shift of faculty constitute a growing and critical problem for higher education?


Kezar: Yes, it appears that this shift might be presenting a critical problem for higher education."

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The Most Transformative Invention Since the iPad | Oculus Rift

The Most Transformative Invention Since the iPad | Oculus Rift | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
I had been prepared to be skeptical of the much-anticipated virtual reality goggles—WIRED has been proclaiming the revolutionary arrival of VR for two decades, and it had come to seem as laughable as Knight-Ridder’s video. Then I tried the Rift on. It was like the moment when I first held the iPad.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Planners, what happens when every student has a pair of these, in five years?


[A]n amazing transition happened as my eyes resolved a new field of vision. I blinked, and while my brain remembered (for a moment) that I was sitting in my office, my eyes told me I was somewhere completely different. And then, in an instant, my brain joined my eyes, and I was there. It was seamless, and it was crazy.

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Hacking the University: A Future Tense Event Recap

Hacking the University: A Future Tense Event Recap | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Even Socrates was skeptical of technology in higher education—he worried about the effect that a newfangled thing called writing would have on learning. According to Kevin Carey, director of the New America Foundation’s Education Policy Program, Socrates thought that the written word was the enemy of memory for students. In...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUP–49 plenary speaker, Jeff Selingo, "said, this time it’s different. Besides the threat of technology infringing on their turf, 75 percent of colleges today have flat or declining revenue. They’ve become mini-cities, trying to do a lot for a lot of people, but the model has become too expensive for both the institutions and the students—a fact that many colleges have yet to contend with.


Universities are slow to recognize that people go to college for different reasons, Selingo said—whether as a coming of age marker, in pursuit of a career, or, of course, midlifers seeking a career change. Technology startups, however, are unbundling these different purposes and focusing on one or two buckets of higher education consumers. And, he added, smart institutions will likely end up doing the same."

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"I've not actually heard of any of the people you just mentioned . . . "

"I've not actually heard of any of the people you just mentioned . . . " | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"I’ve written before about the growing tendency of professionals in higher education to exist blissfully unaware of the goings-on of other parts of the sector. At the time, I was concerned I might have overstated the case.  I’m no longer concerned."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

If someone does know what's going on in many parts of higher education then it's likely to be someone who has planning responsibilities.

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