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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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The Future of Professional Development: Online, Free, and Just-in-Time | Selingo

The Future of Professional Development: Online, Free, and Just-in-Time | Selingo | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

As we celebrate Labor Day this week, it's a time when many of us take stock of our work, our careers, and what changes we might want to make in the coming year.


Indeed, at some point in our lifetime we all have confronted—or will confront—a career change, a new job, or will simply realize our skills are outdated. In previous generations, knowledge developed so slowly that we could last in a job or career for a lifetime with one set of schooling.


But today, knowledge is growing rapidly by the year. Half of what is known today was not known ten years ago and the amount of knowledge in the world is doubling every 18 months, according to the Association for Talent Development. To survive, we constantly need to refresh our knowledge. ...


[A] new economy of learning is emerging. It won’t eliminate continuing and executive education programs, but it will certainly disrupt the field of professional development.

This new shadow learning system is defined by students who need to acquire knowledge quickly (within hours) and in chunks (while standing in line at the supermarket). It is supplied by the likes of the Khan Academy, which serves up 5,000 videos to some 10 million people a month, Lynda.com, which has more than 4 million subscribers for its how-to online tutorials, and even YouTube.

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Does the 'Phenomenon of Enclosure' Threaten the Commons?

Does the 'Phenomenon of Enclosure' Threaten the Commons? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The history of online learning is the history of a plethora of patents. (Watters, 2014) This is a patent for setting up a regional network in the south western United States. That's Nevada. That's Arizona. That's New Mexico. That's Utah. That's Colorado or Wyoming, one of the square ones. Calling it a patent thicket is more than a slight understatement. And it's not just patents, of course, it's copyright, trademarks, even trade secrets. 

Here's one that came out a few weeks ago - I've actually got the screen capture - trademark for pi. (Poulsen, 2014) Yes, pi, the pi that you're all familiar with, 3.141 whatever. A colleague memorized it to 100 digits. I've memorized it to, what, one. 

This is not simply an isolated instance. It's the norm. It's a phenomenon that took place in the industrial revolution. It's a phenomenon taking place in the information revolution. It's a phenomenon of enclosure. You would think we learned from the last time, but we didn't. And it threatens the commons, the common heritage, common knowledge, common culture that we all thought that we own."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A must-read, IOHO. This is only one of many issues examined in this first of three talks which run as a series. Downes is examining "not the problem MOOCs solve at the moment but the problem MOOCs were designed to solve." Since Downes was instrumental in developing the concept of a MOOC, his insights are both clear and from a POV unfamiliar to many higher education leaders.

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MOOCs— There is a reason they can’t take their eyes off the screen.

MOOCs— There is a reason they can’t take their eyes off the screen. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Two years into their existence, MOOCs haven't stolen students away from brick-and-mortar universities. Instead, they've become a genre of their own.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"For the time being, MOOCs seem unlikely to take the place of physical campuses—or even replace for-profit universities, as Lue hopes they will. In order to do that, MOOCs would have to begin offering meaningful credits—the kind someone could take to a job interview and expect to have taken seriously. (For now, even though HarvardX classes feature the same content as their in-person equivalents, it’s not possible for students to earn anything more than a certificate of completion—the equivalent of a “P” in a pass-fail class.)


So what is a MOOC? What makes it different from a brick-and-mortar classroom? In the end, the answer may be exactly what it seems to be: a MOOC is a film. It’s easy to dismiss college-age kids as screen-addicted zombies, but cinema has a particular ability to move people: It’s informative and entertaining; it’s literature and photography at the same time. If nothing else, the MOOC-driven revolution may inspire classroom instructors to make their lessons more dynamic and figure out what really ignites students’ imaginations. There is a reason they can’t take their eyes off the screen."

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Hacking the University: A Future Tense Event Recap

Hacking the University: A Future Tense Event Recap | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Even Socrates was skeptical of technology in higher education—he worried about the effect that a newfangled thing called writing would have on learning. According to Kevin Carey, director of the New America Foundation’s Education Policy Program, Socrates thought that the written word was the enemy of memory for students. In...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUP–49 plenary speaker, Jeff Selingo, "said, this time it’s different. Besides the threat of technology infringing on their turf, 75 percent of colleges today have flat or declining revenue. They’ve become mini-cities, trying to do a lot for a lot of people, but the model has become too expensive for both the institutions and the students—a fact that many colleges have yet to contend with.


Universities are slow to recognize that people go to college for different reasons, Selingo said—whether as a coming of age marker, in pursuit of a career, or, of course, midlifers seeking a career change. Technology startups, however, are unbundling these different purposes and focusing on one or two buckets of higher education consumers. And, he added, smart institutions will likely end up doing the same."

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Online Education Has a Loneliness Problem. Can Harvard Fix It?

Online Education Has a Loneliness Problem. Can Harvard Fix It? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Herzlinger says MOOCs are suited to classes with objective, measurable outcomes. They don’t work as well for teaching conceptual or action-based ideas.


“Didactic courses are very adaptable to the Web,” she says. “I teach accounting as well, and there’s always a right answer. Those courses are easy. Innovation is much more challenging because it has to be interactive and team-based.”
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
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What Steve Blank Learned By Flipping the MOOC

What Steve Blank Learned By Flipping the MOOC | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Two of the hot topics in education in the last few years have been Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and the flipped classroom. I’ve been experimenting with both of them.


What I’ve learned (besides being able to use the word "pedagogy" in a sentence) is: 1) assigning students lectures as homework doesn’t guarantee the students will watch them and 2) in a flipped classroom you can become hostage to the pedagogy.


Here’s the story of what we tried and what we learned.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is a unique perspective on some hot-topic aspects in learning, part of the innovation and creativity that has been spurred by MOOCs. Perhaps not an intended outcome, but a welcome one. The author does a decent job of explaining the iterative improvements (planning process) in his course design.


STEVE BLANK is a retired Silicon Valley serial entrepreneur turned educator who developed the Customer Development methodology that changes the way startups are built. His book The Four Steps to the Epiphany launched the Lean Startup movement.
@sgblank

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MOOCs Revolutionize Corporate Learning and Development

MOOCs Revolutionize Corporate Learning and Development | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

McAfee turned its training around that both saved both time and produced more lucrative sales: ...an average of $500,000 per year in sales [attributed to] new training model.


Before Intel giant McAfee revamped its new-hire orientation, ...80 hours long [with] ... 40 hours of pre-work,, 5 days of on-site training, and ...post-...to be completed at home.


To fix its problem, McAfee turned to ....Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs...called “flipping the classroom” [where]...a majority of learning happens ...by giving students access to course materials and having them probe, discuss, and debate issues with fellow learners as well as the professor.


_________________________

Companies ...have to trust the learner ...incorporating more opportunities for peer reviews and peer-to-peer dialogues...

_________________________


...Can your company re-imagine the role of the learner? ...the learner takes on a role more expansive than ever before, acting as teacher, learner, and peer reviewer.


Companies ...have to trust the learner to do this,  by incorporating more opportunities for peer reviews and peer-to-peer dialogues into the course.


With that change, McAfee turned its training around in a way that both saved both time and produced more lucrative sales: its sales associates now attribute an average of $500,000 per year in sales to the skills they learned through the new training model. 


Three MOOC elements are particularly well-suited to corporate learning & development:  Semi-synchronicity  (cohorts ...[can] motivate each other as they go through the program),  course design (flipping the classroom), and credentials

    In a recent Future Workplace survey, completed by 195 corporate learning and HR professionals, 70 percent of respondents said they saw opportunities to integrate MOOCs into their own company’s learning programs. Even further, this sample of respondents made six recommendations for how MOOC providers could adapt to needs of corporations:


    Related posts by Deb:


       
       



    Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

    Semi-synchronicity  (cohorts ...[can] motivate each other as they go through the program),  course design (flipping the classroom), and credentials.

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 14, 2013 11:55 AM

    This well-done piece by Jeanne Meister, highlights key elements of how MOOCs can turn around the stultifying aspects of corporate learning, well-illustrated through the McAfee example. 

    IanHelps's curator insight, August 26, 2013 9:19 AM

    MOOCs might be just what the corporate L&D world needs to reinvent itself. McAfee appears to be at the leading edge of this change

    Laura Eickert's curator insight, March 11, 2015 4:19 AM

    @Faustine

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    'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.'

    'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

    Love this.


    "It wasn't our intent, I just want to be clear about that now, it was not our intent to destroy universities. That's not why we did it. We want to change universities, and we want them to work for the better.

    Thinking in Models: for Design, for Learning…

    A large part of this talk is about that change. It's interesting. We go from the first slide about people wanting to be relevant, wanting universities to be relevant, all the way to the last slide about what's going to replace universities, without doing all the thinking that we need to do in between. We need to do this thinking in between.

    Let's begin our thinking with where the current trends, we're told, are going. We're told there will be tiered service models at universities. We're told there will be analytics and data-driven management. We're told there will be alternative credentials. To a certain degree, all of these three things are true.

    To a certain degree, none of these three things are going to work themselves out in the way that the economist or economists or education reformers predict. When you look at that, basically it's like they have this model or design in their head of how we could rebuild the university system, wipe it all out, start over, and we'll have a new model.




    Figure 1 - workflow process employed to assist LMS selection

    This model of accountability and cost frameworks and all of that will solve all the problems that the current system has. Models are popular in education too. Here's a model (Figure 1) of a workflow-processed employee to assist LMS selection. You can't really read the small writing there. It goes from enrollment to program administration to learner interactions to content creation to assessment.

    It's a fishbone diagram. If you're in economics or business, you're probably familiar with it.Models of how to select educational technology including customized lists of LMS features, a way of picking among those 305 features of a learning management system that you might want to solve the educational problems at your institution."

    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

    You really need to read this. Or at least skim it. This is not your ordinary POV. "I criticize Coursera. I criticize the Stanford MOOCs and all of that, but when Norvig and Thrun launched their artificial intelligence MOOC, in the first week, 150,000 people signed up. Overall, I think it was something like 250,000 people signed up for one course, a really hard course that's really difficult to understand, in artificial intelligence.


    Forget the fact that a lot of them dropped out. A lot of them didn't. Tens of thousands finished. This, by itself, indicates that the old model wasn't working. There was such a pent-up demand for upper-level university courses in artificial intelligence that, when one was finally made available, people knocked down the doors trying to get to it."

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    MOOC U: Who Is Getting the Most Out of Online Education and Why eBook: Jeffrey J. Selingo

    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

    A short, new, not-yet-published piece on sale in advance of publication—from our well-received #scup49 plenary speaker, Jeff Selingo.

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    3 Trends Are About To Create A Higher-Education Earthquake

    3 Trends Are About To Create A Higher-Education Earthquake | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
    Higher education has remained pretty much the same for hundreds of years, but that may be about to change.
    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

    "Since the first wave of massive online courses launched in 2012, a backlash has focused on their failures and commercial uncertainties. Yet if critics think they are immune to the march of the MOOC, they are almost certainly wrong. Whereas online courses can quickly adjust their content and delivery mechanisms, universities are up against serious cost and efficiency problems, with little chance of taking more from the public purse."

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    Community colleges continue growth in online classes but join general move away from MOOCs

    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

    A nice report from the Instructional Technology Council from a survey of its membership.

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    ELI 2014: MOOCs and MOOC Research (with images, tweets) · kreshleman

    From sessions on MOOCs and MOOC research...biggest takeaway for me is that MOOCs are moving away from disruption toward another tool in the toolkit of ed tech in higher ed.
    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

    Awesome technology turns tweets from the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative meeting into a slide show of volunteer reporting-out. It's not a replacement for being there, of course, but we weren't  :(


    We especially like slide 12.


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    2013— The 'year that online education fell back to earth'?

    2013— The 'year that online education fell back to earth'? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

    In theory, students saddled by rising debt and unable to tap into the best schools would be able to take free classes from rock star professors at elite schools via Udacity, edX, Coursera and other MOOC platforms.


    But if 2012 was the "Year of the MOOC," as The New York Times famously called it, 2013 might be dubbed the year that online education fell back to earth. Faculty at several institutions rebelled against the rapid expansion of online learning — and the nation's largest MOOC providers are responding.

    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

    During the holidays, Eric Westervelt covered the year in online education quite well. Sebastian Thrun: "Online education that leaves almost everybody behind except for highly motivated students, to me, can't be a viable path to education. We look back at our early work and realize it wasn't quite as good as it should have been. We had so many moments for improvement."

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