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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Dear Committee Members: A novel containing only faculty letters of recommendation?

Dear Committee Members: A novel

~ Julie Schumacher (author) More about this product
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From a review in Inside Higher Ed: "'It's a difficult time in higher education,' Schumacher said, 'and I hope the book points that out in a way that's not painfully moralistic.'


Far from it: from the satirical perspective of the aggrieved Fitger, Schumacher delineates very real problems and renders them hilarious without trivializing their human impact. Readers who are themselves tasked with writing entirely too many letters of recommendation may well wish they could write some like Fitger's; failing that, they are likely to enjoy reading his."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"By the novel's end, no solutions have been offered nor any problems solved."

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A New View of Opportunity and Risk Through Dashboards | July 2014, Pittsburgh

A New View of Opportunity and Risk Through Dashboards | July 2014, Pittsburgh | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Get a new view of your institution's risks and opportunities through dashboards that analyze and aggregate information from legacy systems, financial statements, and public agency data into actionable key performance indicators (KPI). Intelligent allocation of resources relies on accurate information. The University of California (UC), with its 41 dashboards and 157 KPIs, reduced the cost of risk, improved credit ratings, and enhanced performance. In particular, through business trends and landscape data presented in charts, graphs, and reports, UC has identified specific areas of loss and cut out millions in workers' compensation costs.


Learning Outcomes:


  1. Develop performance measures from interviewing administrators and risk managers across an enterprise.
  2. Refine performance measures into key performance indicators (KPIs) and key risk indicators (KRIs) for dashboard charts and tables.
  3. Leverage landscape and historical trend information from dashboards to pinpoint areas of loss and areas of opportunity.
  4. Examine programs and strategies to cut out costs in key areas.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Join 1,500+ peers, colleagues, and other experts for higher education's premier planning event. [PA]

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What's next for Rutgers' 700 buildings and 6K acres of land? University develops master plan

What's next for Rutgers' 700 buildings and 6K acres of land? University develops master plan | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Rutgers' engineering school has developed a tool, called "The Swarm," that tracks students as they move across the New Brunswick and Piscataway campuses on a typical day. The tool - which uses class schedules and housing assignments to predict where students travel on campus during the course of a day -- will show campus officials where students congregate and how the campus bus system is used.


"You can see how they aggregate, what different tracks they take, what are the hot spots by the hours of the day, what buses are they on," Rutgers President Robert Barchi said. "The patterns that come out of this are very interesting."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUPer Antonio Calcado is the driving force in this planning, which is about much more than just timing and transportation.

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The Big Data revolution: How data-driven planning and design is transforming project planning

The Big Data revolution: How data-driven planning and design is transforming project planning | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
There are literally hundreds of applications for deep analytics in planning and design projects, not to mention the many benefits for construction teams, building owners, and facility managers. We profile some early successful applications.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUP member and author Gregory Janks provides heft to this Building Design & Construction article, which includes a nice Brown University mini-case study, with data maps. He says: “What we’re trying to promote is more isn’t necessarily better; better is better.”


Janks is author of of the SCUP booklet, Kings of Infinite Space: How to Make Space Planning for Colleges and Universities Useful Given Constrained Resources, and co-author of a recent article in Planning for Higher Education titled "New Metrics for the New NormalRethinking Space Utilization Within the University System in Georgia."


SCUP members can look forward to a follow-up article to "New Metrics": "Formula’s End: The University System of Georgia's Space Data and What it Means," to be published shortly in Planning for Higher Education.


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Survival Requires Taking Time for Important Conversations Outside of Administrative Minutiae

Survival Requires Taking Time for Important Conversations Outside of Administrative Minutiae | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
On Friday, January 31, a group of fifteen faculty and staff  came together as students for the first local "discussion section" of the MOOC on the future of higher education at SUNY Fredonia.   We ...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This could be a useful quote for planners: "As a provost, I find that I have to be determined and disciplined not to let the tyranny of administrative minutiae take command of my head space.  I think it’s a matter of survival that we take time to have important conversations like this."

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What Steve Blank Learned By Flipping the MOOC

What Steve Blank Learned By Flipping the MOOC | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Two of the hot topics in education in the last few years have been Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and the flipped classroom. I’ve been experimenting with both of them.


What I’ve learned (besides being able to use the word "pedagogy" in a sentence) is: 1) assigning students lectures as homework doesn’t guarantee the students will watch them and 2) in a flipped classroom you can become hostage to the pedagogy.


Here’s the story of what we tried and what we learned.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is a unique perspective on some hot-topic aspects in learning, part of the innovation and creativity that has been spurred by MOOCs. Perhaps not an intended outcome, but a welcome one. The author does a decent job of explaining the iterative improvements (planning process) in his course design.


STEVE BLANK is a retired Silicon Valley serial entrepreneur turned educator who developed the Customer Development methodology that changes the way startups are built. His book The Four Steps to the Epiphany launched the Lean Startup movement.
@sgblank

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Webinar— Exploring common spaces

Webinar— Exploring common spaces | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

On Tuesday, January 21 (3:30 - 5:00 p.m.) , the Learning Spaces Collaboratory presents the first in series of four webinars focusing on the campus as an ecosystem of learning spaces--beginning with attention to common spaces, defined as spaces that are agile and flexible enough to accommodate learners in groups large and small, before, after, and sometimes during scheduled class periods; those welcoming and transparent enough to shape a community of learners; spaces giving students authority to own their learning, their spaces for learning.   

 
Questions to be addressed:  What role do common spaces have in the ecosystem of learning spaces?  What role do they play in nurturing robust learning communities? What is a "common" space intended to do, to be [what is their job description]? What impact do such spaces have on 21st century learners?  How do we know?

The webinar will be moderated by Jeanne L. Narum (LSC) and facilitated by:
  • Meredith Bostwick-Lorenzo Eiroa, Associate Director – Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP
  • Kent Duffy, Principal - SRG Partnership, Inc.
  • Keith Sawyer, Morgan Distinguished Professor in Educational Innovations - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Susan Whitmer, Research Lead, Education – Herman Miller
  • Joe M. Williams, Director of Public Services, University Library – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Cathy M. Wolfe, Director of Campus Planning – George Mason University
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Also from the LSC, its new guide (pdf, free) is a must-download for SCUPers and anyone else with an interest in learning environments: Planning for Assessing 21st Century Spaces for 21st Century Learners.

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Change Management in the Trenches

Change Management in the Trenches | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Peter Drucker is attributed with the quote, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” While still the case, postsecondary culture must adjust to both rapid and longer-term shifts in the world around it. The ecologies that have long constituted its culture, including those we all live in and work with, have become even more open as systems. This session focuses on developing attendees’ personal and organizational capacities for effectively managing both anticipated and unpredictable changes in their institutions. This ecological approach identifies where external changes are likely to affect the organization and what it can do to create a "flexible" culture that does not eat strategy. Participants will work with multiple examples of change in their own institutions during a variety of interactive learning experiences.


Audience:
Mid- to upper-level administrators who have responsibility for leading one or more campus units and need to successfully manage change in their organization.


TAGS: Institutional Direction, Organizational culture, Change Management


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
This excellent workshop is presented on Saturday, July 12 (Pittsburgh) at SCUP–49, Plan for the Transformation of Higher Education, by Phyllis T. H. Grummon, consultant, Higher Education Planning; Susan T. Whitmer, research lead, Education, Herman Miller, Inc. They are members of the team which received the SCUP's first Perry Chapman Prize.

If you like this workshop, then consider The Human Side of Strategic Planning in Higher Education, a SCUP book. It was written by SCUP Planning Institute faculty member and faulty trainer Rober P. Delprino with its use as assigned reading for the planning institute. 


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What producer, star say about filming show in Steel City

What producer, star say about filming show in Steel City | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

PASADENA, Calif. -- The Pittsburgh-filmed "Those Who Kill" will bring with it familiar visuals and maybe even familiar faces among the locally based guest actors and background players hired for scenes. "Kill" follows Pittsburgh homicide detective Catherine Jensen (Chloe Sevigny, "Big Love") and forensic psychologist Thomas Schaeffer (James D'Arcy, "Cloud Atlas") as they hunt serial killers. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Another good reason to visit Pittsburgh July 12–15 for Plan to Transform Higher Education, the Society for College and University Planning's 2014 annual conference.

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Afghanistan Higher Education: The Struggle for Quality, Merit, and Transformation

Afghanistan Higher Education: The Struggle for Quality, Merit, and Transformation | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Has Afghan higher education been transformed? Basically yes, with the caveats noted, and indeed to a surprising degree given its limited resources and the little support it has received."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This timely Planning for Higher Education feature article reveals 13 years of very complicated, nation-wide integrated planning for higher education—in a war zone. Its 32 pages may also be the best available general past, present, and future look at Afghan higher education.


The SCUP authors are Mohammed Osman Babury, deputy minister for academic affairs at the Ministry of Higher Education in Afghanistan and Fred M. Hayward, senior higher education advisor at the Ministry of Higher Education

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One-Quarter of Adults Hold Educational Credentials Other Than an Academic Degree, Census Bureau Reports

One-Quarter of Adults Hold Educational Credentials Other Than an Academic Degree, Census Bureau Reports | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In this report, we've been able to measure for the first time how many people take another route to a productive career: holding an alternative educational credential independent of traditional college degrees. It turns out that millions of people have taken this path," added Ewert.

These alternative credentials include professional certifications, licenses and educational certificates. The fields of these professional certifications and licenses were wide-ranging and include business/finance management, nursing, education, cosmetology and culinary arts, among others.

The report shows that, in general, these alternative credentials provide a path to higher earnings. Among full-time workers, the median monthly earnings for someone with a professional certification or license only was $4,167, compared with $3,433 for one with an educational certificate only; $3,920 for those with both types of credentials; and $3,110 for people without any alternative credential.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Certification or alternative credentials have the most positive impact for workers with no college or an associate's degree. Nice to have this benchmark. The more we learn the more we have to change.

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Online Education Has a Loneliness Problem. Can Harvard Fix It?

Online Education Has a Loneliness Problem. Can Harvard Fix It? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Herzlinger says MOOCs are suited to classes with objective, measurable outcomes. They don’t work as well for teaching conceptual or action-based ideas.


“Didactic courses are very adaptable to the Web,” she says. “I teach accounting as well, and there’s always a right answer. Those courses are easy. Innovation is much more challenging because it has to be interactive and team-based.”
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
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6 key findings about going to college

6 key findings about going to college | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Amidst College-educated millennials are outperforming their less-educated peers on virtually every economic measure, and the gap between the two groups has only grown over time.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Amidst all the other uncertainties, this gives planners a secure leg on demand, because this particular outcome measure of a degree can be quantified. On the other hand, there are cost and capacity to consider. What else?

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Trend— Tying college and university presidential compensation to performance measures

Trend— Tying college and university presidential compensation to performance measures | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

It’s not just presidents who are being held to performance measures to get bonuses and raises. Nineteen percent of provosts and 18 percent of chief financial officers at private universities and colleges are, too, Yaffe & Company reports. In Texas, the new incentive pay plan includes vice chancellors.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The landscape of higher ed reveals a trend toward higher ed executive, especially presidential,  bonuses tied to measures of performance such as cost savings, growth in research grants, fundraising, graduation rates and more. This resource examines that trend using, as a case study, John O’Donnell, president of Massachusetts Bay Community College.

  • Patrick Callan of National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The process appears to be undertaken “just to justify extravagant salaries, or is way too focused on fundraising. “In other cases, ‘it’s like they put the presidents on trial,’ and every constituency — faculty, donors, students — is invited to weigh in. That’s just a killer. It creates presidents who won’t take risks.’”
  • Dennis P. Jones of  National Center for Higher Education Management (NCHEMS), a frequent SCUP speaker: “It all goes to the idea of putting money behind the goals you’re trying to achieve. If that’s more graduates, let’s pay for graduates. If it’s something else, let’s pay for that.”
  • Stephen Pollack of consulting firm Mercer: “Corporate concepts are just starting to drift into academia, and they have to. Institutions can’t afford not to have competent people in these jobs.”
  • From Community College Daily www.ccdaily.com by Rebecca Trounson/Hechinger Report.
  • Tags: Presidents, Leadership, Resource and Budget Planning, Compensation
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Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's curator insight, January 7, 2014 8:50 PM

I find it kind of troubling that college presidents have there salary partially based on the graduation rates of students. especially since students come and go, but a president can't MAKE them staqy, when someone wants to leave a college they will because it is a descision made by a person, I find this to be important because If I end up going to a college that does this I dont want to be swayed to stay for some other persons salary