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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Yes, Master’s: A Graduate Degree’s Moment in the Age of Higher Education Innovation

Yes, Master’s: A Graduate Degree’s Moment in the Age of Higher Education Innovation | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Therefore, to truly enable economic mobility in our society, we must acknowledge the master’s degree’s growing role as employers’ preferred or required educational qualification for many middle and professional-class jobs. Furthermore, in addition to the economic benefits of master’s-level education to individuals and employers, researchers have illustrated that greater levels of educational attainment are associated with higher levels of societal and community engagement and well-being."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The author, Sean Gallagher, is chief strategy officer at Northeastern University. Does an evolved Master's degree have a stronger role to play in the future of some higher ed institutions?

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Kelly Brenner Smith's curator insight, August 8, 2014 10:39 PM

Just something to think about when planning your educational journey ....

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Are Ivy League Schools Really Offering the Best Architectural Education?

Are Ivy League Schools Really Offering the Best Architectural Education? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"What this shows is that there are two fundamentally different ways of teaching taking place in US architecture schools. On the one hand are the Ivy League schools, with a focus on design and theory; on the other are schools focusing on the practical aspects of construction and sustainability. Both types of architectural teaching are finding success, with Harvard being first overall for its Graduate program, and Cal Poly first overall for its Undergraduate program.


Should we be surprised that Ivy League schools are finding success in the traditionally ‘academic’ aspects of training, while a Polytechnic is leading in teaching technical expertise? Perhaps not. What is more intriguing is that while professionals are obviously highly appreciative of both styles of teaching, in the case of the Ivy League schools this admiration seems to be one way traffic."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Like most unhealthy relationships, correcting this problem will require compromises from both sides. The profession has to find a way to position itself closer to the Ivy League graduate’s conception of architecture, and Ivy League schools really ought to be educating students in a way that doesn’t leave them alienated by the realities of making buildings.


How might schools do this? The answer may lie in those “very nearly mutually exclusive” lists from earlier. The University of Southern California seems to be producing uniquely balanced architects, appearing on four of the five lists highlighted and six of the eight lists in total, with their undergraduate program ranked 7th overall. Sadly, the statistics can’t tell us exactly how they achieve this balance – but this university may be one to watch in the future.

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