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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.'

'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Love this.


"It wasn't our intent, I just want to be clear about that now, it was not our intent to destroy universities. That's not why we did it. We want to change universities, and we want them to work for the better.

Thinking in Models: for Design, for Learning…

A large part of this talk is about that change. It's interesting. We go from the first slide about people wanting to be relevant, wanting universities to be relevant, all the way to the last slide about what's going to replace universities, without doing all the thinking that we need to do in between. We need to do this thinking in between.

Let's begin our thinking with where the current trends, we're told, are going. We're told there will be tiered service models at universities. We're told there will be analytics and data-driven management. We're told there will be alternative credentials. To a certain degree, all of these three things are true.

To a certain degree, none of these three things are going to work themselves out in the way that the economist or economists or education reformers predict. When you look at that, basically it's like they have this model or design in their head of how we could rebuild the university system, wipe it all out, start over, and we'll have a new model.




Figure 1 - workflow process employed to assist LMS selection

This model of accountability and cost frameworks and all of that will solve all the problems that the current system has. Models are popular in education too. Here's a model (Figure 1) of a workflow-processed employee to assist LMS selection. You can't really read the small writing there. It goes from enrollment to program administration to learner interactions to content creation to assessment.

It's a fishbone diagram. If you're in economics or business, you're probably familiar with it.Models of how to select educational technology including customized lists of LMS features, a way of picking among those 305 features of a learning management system that you might want to solve the educational problems at your institution."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

You really need to read this. Or at least skim it. This is not your ordinary POV. "I criticize Coursera. I criticize the Stanford MOOCs and all of that, but when Norvig and Thrun launched their artificial intelligence MOOC, in the first week, 150,000 people signed up. Overall, I think it was something like 250,000 people signed up for one course, a really hard course that's really difficult to understand, in artificial intelligence.


Forget the fact that a lot of them dropped out. A lot of them didn't. Tens of thousands finished. This, by itself, indicates that the old model wasn't working. There was such a pent-up demand for upper-level university courses in artificial intelligence that, when one was finally made available, people knocked down the doors trying to get to it."

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Editorial: College of the Future

Editorial: College of the Future | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

In the current issue of Change magazine, the editor issues a call for crowdsourcing a future novel about higher education set in 2044. We bet that SCUPers could bring some dense and thoughtful insights to the scenario she is developing.


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

In this editorial, I'm going to depart from my habit of pulling together the articles in an issue to muse about the setting for a science-fiction novel. So let's do some crowdsourcing here: To make the setting as dense and realistic as possible, I'd like you to provide suggestions for additional features of the landscape. 


The novel is set in 2044. Clio, my hero (she's way too plucky to be called a heroine) is 25 years old-that is, in late adolescence-and she's decided, after an intensive two-year internship in Nicaragua, to move on to the next stage of her life.


So here are the kind of advanced learning and credentialing opportunities that are open to her, so that she can maximize her chances of a prosperous and satisfying adulthood.


The residential colleges and universities that still remain (many closed in the aftermath of the Really Great Recession of 2022) look much the same as they did at the beginning of the century. They provide the scions of the Onepercenters with a safe haven for consolidating the social bonds of their global network. They also offer a few Managers and Workers of exceptional ability (identified by their Coaches-see below) the opportunity to enter the Onepercenter clubhouse by acquiring the requisite social capital-a strategy that both maintains the myth of equal opportunity and infuses the Onepercenter community with a certain hybrid vigor.

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Survival Requires Taking Time for Important Conversations Outside of Administrative Minutiae

Survival Requires Taking Time for Important Conversations Outside of Administrative Minutiae | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
On Friday, January 31, a group of fifteen faculty and staff  came together as students for the first local "discussion section" of the MOOC on the future of higher education at SUNY Fredonia.   We ...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This could be a useful quote for planners: "As a provost, I find that I have to be determined and disciplined not to let the tyranny of administrative minutiae take command of my head space.  I think it’s a matter of survival that we take time to have important conversations like this."

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Beautiful, Innovative, and Sustainable: The Future of Green Architecture

Beautiful, Innovative, and Sustainable: The Future of Green Architecture | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Today, architecture finds itself at a crossroads.

Building materials and new construction, along with the operation and maintenance of buildings, account for a significant sum of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.


Faced with this fact, how are architects to responsibly pursue the act (and art) of architecture without further deteriorating the planet’s environmental make-up or depleting its resources?

What forms of high and low technology can be developed to curtail the injurious side of building?

Can good—or even great—architecture be sustainable?


The answer, of course, is yes. The best buildings have always shown a concern for their immediate environs and how they fit in them, whether they were conscious of “sustainability” or not. Now, all architects and buildings are expected to be engaged with sustainable standards, such as LEED titles, photovoltaic cells, or green roofs—all things that these 10 projects have in common. Check out our favorite projects in architecture + sustainability...


Via Lauren Moss
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Lauren Moss's curator insight, January 17, 2013 6:32 PM

A curated collection of (relatively) recent sustainable building projects that highlight innovative approaches to environmental design and green building, with links provided for additional information and details.

Paige's curator insight, August 6, 2014 2:47 PM

Green architecture! I've dreamt and have considered going into a field of real estate specializing in the building and selling of eco-friendly homes!

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The Next America: ... the Looming Generational Showdown | Three POVs from Higher Ed - YouTube

Three authors for the journal Planning for Higher Education share their takes on Paul Taylor's book. Taylor will be at higher education's premier planning event, "Plan for Transformation in Higher Education," in Pittsburgh, July 12–16:

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Our guests for this video Planning Interview were SCUPers Linda Baer, Marie Gardner, and James Morisson.

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The America of the near future will look nothing like the America of the recent past.

The America of the near future will look nothing like the America of the recent past. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Drawing on Pew Research Center’s extensive archive of public opinion surveys and demographic data, The Next America is a rich portrait of where we are as a nation and where we’re headed—toward a future marked by the most striking social, racial and economic shifts the country has seen in a century.
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The Future of Higher Education Infographic

The Future of Higher Education Infographic | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The Future of Higher Education Infographic takes a look at the paths that higher education could take in the next few years.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

An interesting visual.

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Research: IT Predictions for 2013 -- Campus Technology

Research: IT Predictions for 2013 -- Campus Technology | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The IT industry's transition to mobile computing, cloud services, social networking, and big data technologies--collectively referred to as the third platform--will accelerate in 2013, according to IDC Predictions 2013: Competing on the 3rd...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Much more focused on the business and dollars end of these forthcoming changes, than on the capabilities and user/learner experiences. But useful knowledge about the continuing impact of these technologies on what we can, or must, do.

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