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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Learning Analytics and Ethics: A Framework beyond Utilitarianism

Learning Analytics and Ethics: A Framework beyond Utilitarianism | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Learning analytics stand poised to benefit students in previously impossible ways. Alongside innovation, however, ethical discussions need probing questions, assessments of possible outcomes, and active disagreement about future developments. Ethical modeling will not achieve these, at least not in a substantive way; principled reflection needs to keep up with the speed of innovation as closely as possible. An inner matrix of tensions will achieve ethical reflection aligned with innovation — or at least get us closer to that goal. When schools or companies build new learning analytics systems, or when schools are deciding between competing products, ethical discussions ought to be in the forefront of outcomes-based commitments. The proposed tensions of utopianism (what is the very best outcome?), ambiguity (are the outcomes knowable?), and nihilism (how are unexpected outcomes handled?) can help institutions and companies fulfill the goal of assisting student success."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The author, James E. Willis, III is an educational assessment specialist at Purdue University.

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'When combined, workplace facilities and culture can exceed the lure of money'

'When combined, workplace facilities and culture can exceed the lure of money' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Put simply, when combined, workplace facilities and culture can exceed the lure of money."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Where does a faculty member work? Where is the faculty workplace? The campus? The classroom? An on-campus faculty office? 

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Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, September 5, 2014 10:09 AM

What do we find most attractive about a new job offer? How important is the physical workplace in that decision-making process? A recent Australian study, undertaken by Hassell Architects and Empirica Research, dug up some intriguing stories about the role of workplace culture, people and design in the decisions we make about where we will spend ours days.

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Dear Committee Members: A novel containing only faculty letters of recommendation?

Dear Committee Members: A novel

~ Julie Schumacher (author) More about this product
List Price: $22.95
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You Save: $7.46 (33%)

From a review in Inside Higher Ed: "'It's a difficult time in higher education,' Schumacher said, 'and I hope the book points that out in a way that's not painfully moralistic.'


Far from it: from the satirical perspective of the aggrieved Fitger, Schumacher delineates very real problems and renders them hilarious without trivializing their human impact. Readers who are themselves tasked with writing entirely too many letters of recommendation may well wish they could write some like Fitger's; failing that, they are likely to enjoy reading his."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"By the novel's end, no solutions have been offered nor any problems solved."

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Engage faculty members in student recruitment and retention with these strategies

Engage faculty members in student recruitment and retention with these strategies | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The bottom line…

Remember these best practices for engaging faculty members in recruitment and retention:

  • Help faculty members understand why their help is valuable.
  • Encourage faculty members to participate in recruitment events.
  • Plan outreach efforts such as summer camps that include professors.
  • Create systems for tracking student success and reach out to students who are having trouble.
  • Be available and encourage conversations with students so that you know what they like and don’t like."
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Public Health dean won’t be reinstated at the University of Saskatchewan

Public Health dean won’t be reinstated at the University of Saskatchewan | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Interim president says the university will stick to TransformUS restructuring plans and budget cuts
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Change is coming to U. Saskatchewan, and it's a struggle. 

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New Directions for Higher Education: Q&A with Education Scholar Adrianna Kezar on the Changing Faculty

New Directions for Higher Education: Q&A with Education Scholar Adrianna Kezar on the Changing Faculty | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"DiSalvio: Full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty were once the norm in higher education. However, the numbers and proportions of non-tenure track faculty as a segment of the professoriate has crept higher over the past decade and adjunct faculty now make up the majority of the higher education workforce. Does this shift of faculty constitute a growing and critical problem for higher education?


Kezar: Yes, it appears that this shift might be presenting a critical problem for higher education."

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Teaching and Learning About Teaching and Learning

Teaching and Learning About Teaching and Learning | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Teaching and learning excellence did not exist, because no one measured it.


Thankfully, the epoch of unconscious teaching and learning has passed, and Teaching and Learning is now established as a bona fide hyperarticulated discipline with its own floor space, Web presence, and vigilantly guarded photocopier. We at the CTL spread excellence by steering faculty away from their focus on content (who, after all, needs to know the dates of the Civil War?) toward a more universal design model, in which knowledge-delivery systems are systematically delivered.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

As the author concludes, "The possibilities are truly endless."

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U. of California at Riverside Will Hire 300 New Professors Over 5 Years

"'I really see this as a chance for us to diversify our faculty,' Mr. Wilcox said. 'This is a chance for us to recruit people to an institution that has a critical mass of students and staff of color, and that has a reputation of academic excellence.' In a recent interview with The Chronicle, Mr. Wilcox described how Riverside had achieved parity in student success, across racial and income groups."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Going from 700 to 1,000 faculty offers an amazing transformational opportunity for planners. [pa]

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'[O]f all the machines that humanity has created, few seem more precisely calibrated to the destruction of hope than the academic job market'

'[O]f all the machines that humanity has created, few seem more precisely calibrated to the destruction of hope than the academic job market' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A personal story.

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Blog post comparing academe to a drug gang provokes much discussion

Scott Jaschick reviews a currently popular blog post that compares the behavior of newly minted PhDs to those who seek to join drug gangs.


Then [the blogger] turns to academe and finds very similar conditions. "The academic job market is structured in many respects like a drug gang, with an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core of insiders. Even if the probability that you might get shot in academia is relatively small (unless you mark student papers very harshly), one can observe similar dynamics," he writes. "Academia is only a somewhat extreme example of this trend, but it affects labor markets virtually everywhere....  Academic systems more or less everywhere rely at least to some extent on the existence of a supply of 'outsiders' ready to forgo wages and employment security in exchange for the prospect of uncertain security, prestige, freedom and reasonably high salaries that tenured positions entail."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Here's the original blog post.

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Wallflowers at the Revolution: Evolving Faculty Perspectives on Online Education

Wallflowers at the Revolution: Evolving Faculty Perspectives on Online Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The 2013 Inside Higher Ed Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology, jointly administered by Inside Higher Ed and Gallup, is the second annual attempt to gauge academic opinion on technology and teaching. Often, faculty opinion is based on little direct experience or familiarity, or biased based on their own plunge into online learning. Regardless, the evolving subjective perceptions of e-learning are fascinating to see unfold. Even when experiences are anecdotal or uniformed, this survey shows how, in aggregate, educational technology is gradually becoming a fixture within academe. But not without its nagging controversies. We are in the midst of something between an evolution and a revolution—a modification of business-as-usual and a major transformation. These findings provide a snapshot of our changing times, which will likely look dated and even naive a few years from now.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A valuable analysis and perspective of the data from this survey. We like the first subhead: "Lack of familiarity breeds contempt." [

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One man's mission to save City College of San Francisco

One man's mission to save City College of San Francisco | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The fate of City College of San Francisco, one of the nation's largest community colleges, rests largely on a state-appointed trustee named Robert Agrella.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is a Wall Street Journal article centered on the state-appointed trustee, Robert Agrella, a former community cllege president.

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Are You Working With a Learning Designer? | Inside Higher Ed

Are You Working With a Learning Designer? | Inside Higher Ed | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

My hypothesis is that the ability to collaborate with a learning designer is the single most important determinant of faculty successfully integrating technology into their teaching.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The author asks some good questions, such as:


How are learning designers distributed on campus? Central IT units or in individual schools or departments?

Beyond levels (the number of learning designers), what are the trends in hiring? How quickly are learning designers being recruited to campus? Where is the rate of learning design hiring the fastest? Is there an adequate supply of trained learning designers to meet demand? Are we seeing salaries go up for learning designers based on a growth in demand (and the fact that learning designers can work in academia or industry?)

How is this new platoon (or trickle - I don’t know) of learning designers being paid for? Are campuses shifting resources from system admins (as more platforms are rented from the cloud rather than provisioned locally), or does the hiring of learning designers require new resources?    

Are elements of the existing campus workforce being re-trained to accomplish tasks that we would recognize as those that a learning designer would specialize in?


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A Professor in the President's Chair: Pushing for a 'Friendly Revolution'

A Professor in the President's Chair: Pushing for a 'Friendly Revolution' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"There are only two branches to this job: No. 1, make sure students are getting the most profound, life-changing, life-enhancing educational experience they can, and, No. 2, make sure that 100 years from now, whoever’s sitting in this chair will have the resources so he or she can do the exact same thing. That’s all. Everything else is noise."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"When I took out a yellow legal pad and wrote everything down, including things like deferred maintenance and infrastructure for technology that hadn’t been included, the structural debt ballooned to a little over $6-million. That’s when I realized, Wow, I’m in this thing. We’ve chiseled away at that debt, but I hadn’t expected to spend that much time and effort on such issues."

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Watch Seemingly Every College Dean From the Movies Lose It Completely

Watch Seemingly Every College Dean From the Movies Lose It Completely | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
It’s back-to-school time, and this got us thinking about one of the more amusing tropes from the movies and television: short-tempered college (and grad school) deans getting unreasonably (and sometimes reasonably) angry at the students in their charge. We compiled our favorite such scenes in this supercut. Enjoy.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We just had to share this at the semester's dawn.

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An Look at Adjunct Leaders' Views on Long-term Strategies

"Concordia adjuncts have strategically sought over time to 'permeate' the university’s governance structure, and serve – with compensation – on committees of all kinds, including hiring committees. That visibility has bred respect from the administration, she said, which is demonstrated by contract wins such as a $240,000 professional development fund specifically for part-time faculty."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Reporting from the Coalition of Contingent Academic Labor conference. There are a number of trends there which parallel or interact with other disruption/transformation trends with regard to faculty roles over time. For example, if you cannot deny the growing role of adjuncts, then why not invest in ensuring they are the best and have the resources to do their jobs well? Why not look at what else they can do, or what they will be doing?

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Query: Graduate assistant space—What's new?

Query: Graduate assistant space—What's new? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Who out there has redesigned graduate assistant space to support the way grads work and study today (versus 20 years ago)? Semi-private offices just aren't an option for some of our buildings and programs - nor are they necessary.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Please share what you have been doing or what you have learned about.

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The Next America: ... the Looming Generational Showdown | Three POVs from SCUP

Three authors for the journal Planning for Higher Education share their takes on Paul Taylor's book. Taylor will be at higher education's premier planning ev...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

As always, it was a great conversation, with much emphasis on faculty change.

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Three Pieces of the Puzzle: Instructional Content and Online Higher Education | Acrobatiq

Three Pieces of the Puzzle: Instructional Content and Online Higher Education | Acrobatiq | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
However, talk of online education's current "transformative", "revolutionary" and (worst of all) "disruptive" impact on traditional higher education ignores the
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The problems with instructional content stem from how courses are created. In most non-profit colleges and universities, the responsibility for the design and development of instructional content continues to fall to under-resourced and typically ill-prepared individual faculty members. The service departments set up in most institutions to support online learning have not substantially changed this fundamental division of labor. Instructional design professionals in these departments – despite their skills – are forced into secondary roles, often pushed toward providing technical training (“How to Set Up Quizzes in Blackboard”), rather than actually working with course instructors to design instruction. The funds available for course development are severely limited to what can be reasonably generated by way of tuition revenue (minus direct expenses) over a few semesters. And incentive systems of traditional colleges and universities make it illogical for faculty to spend excessive time developing instructional content, even if they had the wide range of skills necessary for this kind of work. There are exceptions to this state of affairs, but too few.

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The Uprising at the University of Michigan | Administrative Services Transformation (AST)

The Uprising at the University of Michigan | Administrative Services Transformation (AST) | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Just after Thanksgiving, engineering Professor Fawwaz Ulaby posted an open letter to the U-M administration, protesting a plan to eliminate more than 300 jobs in the university's departments and schools. The online reaction was swift. Within three days, more than 1,000 faculty members from across the university had co-signed the letter--including half a dozen


The storm blew up around the awkwardly named "Administrative Services Transformation," a cost-cutting initiative hammered out for the university by Accenture, a global consulting firm. Among other things, AST would outsource financial and personnel tasks now handled within schools and departments to a "shared services center" on S. State Street."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Just after Thanksgiving, engineering Professor Fawwaz Ulaby posted an open letter to the U-M administration, protesting a plan to eliminate more than 300 jobs in the university's departments and schools. The online reaction was swift. Within three days, more than 1,000 faculty members from across the university had co-signed the letter--including half a dozen

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The problem is not the students. - Casting Out Nines -

"What I do get upset over is the attitude, held by some, that the problem with flipped learning resides in the students. That students, generally speaking, are the problem. That students these days simply aren’t as 'good' as they used to be; that they have no attention span; that professors are complicit by not holding students to any kind of rigorous standard; that the flipped classroom is 'obviously' not rigorous and so it’s a perfect match for students these days; that what we profs really need to do is 'teach the willing' rather than 'take care of the mediocre'; that we should not be 'at the mercy of the students'.


I have learned that whenever I post something about flipped learning or anything else that is not standard lecture, I will get comments from folks whose words make it painfully clear that their work in higher education would be a lot easier if it weren’t for all those damned students. To those people, I would just like to say a few things."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Excellent read; a good comments thread has started as well.

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Keaton Toscano's curator insight, April 14, 2014 12:55 AM

In my introduction to education class at my local community college, we spent a great deal of time talking about the "essence" of teaching and developing (for those of us who were taking the class to become educators, and not a GUR) educational philosophies. I personally have a philosophy that students should be heavily dependent on reasoning, communication and collaboration; if you're a genius but can't share your thoughts, what good are you?

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Cultivating the Next Generation of Academic Leaders: Implications for Administrators and Faculty

Cultivating the Next Generation of Academic Leaders: Implications for Administrators and Faculty | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"There is a fair amount of skepticism on the part of faculty, particularly successful faculty, about the value of academic leadership."


-Faculty Member


"We are really questioning the idea of protecting junior faculty from service… Strategically, we need to give people opportunities to show leadership and to develop their skills."


-Administrator

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

With many baby boomers preparing to retire, higher education is facing an anticipated shortage of academic administrators. Compounding this challenge, many mid-career faculty are reluctant to fill these important positions, concerned that academic leadership is incompatible with work-life balance, that it detracts from their commitments to research and teaching, and that it is tantamount to "going to the dark side." Further, administrative roles have become more complex over the past decade due to increased regulatory requirements and budget constraints.

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Collaborative Book on Teaching with Technology

Collaborative Book on Teaching with Technology | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Deutsch is looking for authors.

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Dr. Nellie Deutsch's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:32 AM

Learning has no borders when it comes to technology. Today, students and teachers can connect for learning 24/7. They no longer need to be in the same physical space. However, connecting face-to-face in realtime is very important to the learning process. Teaching in a Live Online Class can be very rewarding for the teacher and student. 
There are many benefits to the face-to-face real time online learning environment that require our attention. Teaching in a asynchronous non-time dependent learning platform is not enough for today’s student. Students need immediate gratifications.

Students need to have the opportunity to be with the instructor in real time, so they can get immediate response to their questions and not have to wait. They need to see the teacher in action. What is your opinion. 

Please fill in the form if you're interested in writing a chapter or chapters and collaborating on a book on teaching with technology and sharing your experiences. The first chapter/s draft is due on December 31, 2013. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YxzzlY_9l7dE7nNwV4ezWqRaVSzNBTmFXvzCddS_uCg/viewform

Dr. Nellie Deutsch's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:32 AM

Learning has no borders when it comes to technology. Today, students and teachers can connect for learning 24/7. They no longer need to be in the same physical space. However, connecting face-to-face in realtime is very important to the learning process. Teaching in a Live Online Class can be very rewarding for the teacher and student. 
There are many benefits to the face-to-face real time online learning environment that require our attention. Teaching in a asynchronous non-time dependent learning platform is not enough for today’s student. Students need immediate gratifications.

Students need to have the opportunity to be with the instructor in real time, so they can get immediate response to their questions and not have to wait. They need to see the teacher in action. What is your opinion. 

Please fill in the form if you're interested in writing a chapter or chapters and collaborating on a book on teaching with technology and sharing your experiences. The first chapter/s draft is due on December 31, 2013. 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YxzzlY_9l7dE7nNwV4ezWqRaVSzNBTmFXvzCddS_uCg/viewform

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Why I Am Dropping Out of Administration

Why I Am Dropping Out of Administration | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"I've come to several conclusions about working in administration:

 

  • Leading faculty members is not at all like running a business. It's about creating an atmosphere that allows faculty members to accomplish their goals and dreams. Some administrators fail to understand that.
  • Some faculty members are simply hard-wired to disagree with administrators. ...
  • Depending on what your administrative job is, you might be spending most of your time dealing with complaints. ...
  • As an administrator, you're never truly off duty. ...
  • While people often seek administrative posts because they see themselves as leaders, much of the day-to-day job is not really about leading. Instead, it is often about signing documents, approving travel requests, vetting adjuncts, writing evaluations, sending thank-you notes, creating committees. ...
  • Oddly, some administrative work is unavailable once you become an administrator. ... As a full-time administrator, however, I don't sit on any "faculty" committees. It seems a little ironic to me that once I step down from administration, I'll be eligible to do more committee work at the university level than I can do now.
  • The work of administration can be lonely."
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Complex.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:10 AM

This higher education focused post has relevance to anyone in a professional position who considers or has been in an administrative role.    

The role of a department or shared services business manager may be highlighted by the author's view that it isn't like running a business.  With higher education pressures today, that could be a serious omission.  ~  Deb

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Held in Reserve

Held in Reserve | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
It might be hard, but academics can be reintegrated into society!
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We like this paragraph:


"Admittedly, the folks I know with Master’s and Doctorate degrees are uniformly unemployed or underemployed. The problem facing PhDs on the outside is all those false notions they and others have about life on the inside. The “ivory tower” cliché is mostly tripe; yeah, they’re a bit weird at times, but academics are professionals like any other and not precious eccentrics unfit for normal life. Too many of them leave the profession with a false notion that they can’t do anything else, forgetting they’ve spent years learning how to conduct research, solve problems, analyze complex systems, communicate powerfully and effectively, edit documents, complete large-scale tasks, motivate others, and think seriously in a focused way through issues that have baffled others before them. In other words, they’d be an asset to most large organizations. Conversely, those companies tend to be fairly myopic when it comes to who and what skills to exploit and how. What is needed, it seems, are headhunters who specialize in making academics into productive members of society. No egghead left behind!"

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