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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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How Economically Diverse Is Your College? A 'New York Times’ Ranking May Soon Tell

How Economically Diverse Is Your College? A 'New York Times’ Ranking May Soon Tell | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The newspaper's new project isn't trying to pick the best colleges. It’s more interested in how well they attract underprivileged students. ... 'Our project is much more of an analysis than it is any attempt at a comprehensive ranking,' says David Leonhardt, who heads The Upshot, the "Times" division that will produce the new ratings."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Other rankings "'are all attempts at some kind of comprehensive overview,' Mr. Leonhardt said in a follow-up interview on Thursday. What The Upshot plans to unveil, starting with the findings being released at the September conference, is a 'a more targeted look,' based on particular slices of data. 'We’re not trying to do a comprehensive, throw-everything-in look at colleges.'"

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Tracey Vickery's curator insight, September 5, 2014 11:17 PM

This might be the way to finally break the branding zombies.

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Community College Transfers Can Thrive at the Nation’s Best Colleges and Universities

Community College Transfers Can Thrive at the Nation’s Best Colleges and Universities | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation finds that many low-income students who excel in community colleges will continue to excel if given the chance to transfer to highly selective four-year colleges. Despite academic success at the community college level, lower-income students have a difficult pathway to navigate to get to elite institutions, and such institutions have not been looking in the right places nor making it easy for academically qualified students to gain access. Foundation Vice President Emily R. Froimson outlines ways institutions can find and prepare students and support them through and after transfer. "

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Northeastern University Looks at the College Board’s Redesigned SAT

Northeastern University Looks at the College Board’s Redesigned SAT | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"With this announcement, the College Board is taking responsibility for the glaring inequalities that exist in our education system. The organization is attempting to level the playing field so that all students can work through the college application process with the same expectation of success."


Ronné Patrick Turner is associate vice president of enrollment and dean of admissions at Northeastern University.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Good insights.

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Beyond Facebook: What's next for social media in higher ed?

[U]nderutilization of social media is a red-flag for many prospective students."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting in its description of some of the services in the realm being marketed to institutions.

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One-Quarter of Adults Hold Educational Credentials Other Than an Academic Degree, Census Bureau Reports

One-Quarter of Adults Hold Educational Credentials Other Than an Academic Degree, Census Bureau Reports | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In this report, we've been able to measure for the first time how many people take another route to a productive career: holding an alternative educational credential independent of traditional college degrees. It turns out that millions of people have taken this path," added Ewert.

These alternative credentials include professional certifications, licenses and educational certificates. The fields of these professional certifications and licenses were wide-ranging and include business/finance management, nursing, education, cosmetology and culinary arts, among others.

The report shows that, in general, these alternative credentials provide a path to higher earnings. Among full-time workers, the median monthly earnings for someone with a professional certification or license only was $4,167, compared with $3,433 for one with an educational certificate only; $3,920 for those with both types of credentials; and $3,110 for people without any alternative credential.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Certification or alternative credentials have the most positive impact for workers with no college or an associate's degree. Nice to have this benchmark. The more we learn the more we have to change.

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Study finds impact of attending poor high school follows one to college

The study, released today by the National Bureau of Economic Research, examines the college grades of students admitted to the University of Texas at Austin through the "10 percent program" in which the top students at every Texas high school have been guaranteed admission (although the percentage has been reduced somewhat since the plan was created).


The study (abstract available here) found that the quality of high school is a key predictor of grades in college, not only in freshman year, but continuing into the sophomore and junior years as well.

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Indian Universities Still Lag in World Rankings

Indian Universities Still Lag in World Rankings | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The three ranking surveys use methodologies that emphasize academic research and faculty citation in journals, followed by other measures like employer reputation, academic reputation, faculty-student ratio, and the international composition of faculty and students. Indian universities lose out on many of these fronts. In addition to lack of research citations, they perform badly on other metrics like faculty-to-student ratios and lack of internationalism.


To be sure, there is a debate around rankings methodology and whether it is fair to rate Indian universities against older and richer Western institutions.


“India has domestic priorities to educate more young people,” said Phil Baty, editor of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. Still, he said, “there should be an elite group of institutions that focus on global competitiveness.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Intense: "Competition to get into elite state-run colleges is fierce. Last year, 512,000 applicants sought admission for 9,647 spots in the 15 technology institutes and the Indian School of Mines. Indian news media regularly report on the exorbitant percentages required of graduating high school students to gain a spot at state-run institutions like Delhi University or Bombay University, sometimes upward of 99 percent in certain colleges for degrees in commerce or technology."

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Community Colleges Get Strategic About Enrollment

Community Colleges Get Strategic About Enrollment | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

For decades, the community-college sector expanded almost automatically as it helped broaden access to higher education, says Peter S. Bryant, a senior vice president at the consulting firm Noel-Levitz. But waiting for students to show up is no longer enough, says Mr. Bryant, who has seen more business lately from community colleges. "There's a growing realization," he says, "that there has got to be a much more strategic approach."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Very important message for community college planners about enrollment.

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Enrollment Woes Push Small Colleges to Be Strategic

Enrollment Woes Push Small Colleges to Be Strategic | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The dynamics that are reshaping higher education pose challenges for small tuition-dependent colleges. But some are finding ways to thrive.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

No innovation is a panacea, of course. Introducing a new academic program isn't cheap. Revamping curricula takes time, and demands considerable cooperation among administrators and faculty members. And even the best plans might not have a lasting impact on enrollment.


Mr. Ries at Concordia suspects that a college can ride the benefits of a signature change, like cutting tuition, for only three or four years. That means college leaders must continuously anticipate their next move. "You've got to be dancing all the time," he says. But that's surely preferable to standing still.

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Selective Admissions to Community Colleges?

"In my darker moments, I wonder if community colleges are too egalitarian, or utopian, for a culture that has forgotten that a significant middle class is a human construct, rather than a natural law. I’d be up for a principled moral argument about whether we want a political economy that’s more like Sweden or more like Brazil. Let’s have that argument, and have it honestly.  But let’s not pretend that protecting the poor from their own ambition is for their own good. It isn’t. They know better. That’s why they’re here."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

What do you think?

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Machines v. Lawyers by John O. McGinnis, City Journal Spring 2014

Machines v. Lawyers by John O. McGinnis, City Journal Spring 2014 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
As information technology advances, the legal profession faces a great disruption.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The growing role of machine intelligence will create new competition in the legal profession and reduce the incomes of many lawyers. The job category that the Bureau of Labor Statistics calls “other legal services”—which includes the use of technology to help perform legal tasks—has already been surging, over 7 percent per year from 1999 to 2010. As a consequence, the law-school crisis will deepen, forcing some schools to close and others to reduce tuitions. While lawyers and law professors may mourn the loss of more lucrative professional opportunities, consumers of modest means will enjoy access to previously cost-prohibitive services.

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Student Loan Borrowers Win, Nightmare Forms Remain

Student Loan Borrowers Win, Nightmare Forms Remain | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Narmak Nassirian has his finger on the pulse of what’s coming at higher ed in many areas. Last week, he appeared in both Time and the Huffington Post, with regard to student loans (see below).


SCUPers will get a chance to meet and hear Hassirian July 12–16 in Pittsburgh—at higher ed's premier planning event for 2014,  Plan for the Transformation of Higher Education. Register now.


  • Student Loan Borrowers Win As Education Department Reverses:

    Barmak Nassirian, director of federal relations and policy analysis for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, said last month that the Education Department was not ‘sufficiently focused on its primary clients: students.’” [Time]

  • Student Loan Forms Are Still a Nightmare

    “‘The persistent complexity is partly because the financial-aid formula itself is so confusing,’ said Barmak Nassirian ... ‘With the FAFSA, it’s better to own your home, for example. ... Better than that is to own a farm, and better than that is to own a small business with fewer than 99 employees. [Huffington Post]’”
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Members of the Society for College and University Planning and their peers will get a chance to meet and hear Hassirian July 12–16 in Pittsburgh—at higher ed's premier planning event for 2014,  Plan for the Transformation of Higher Education. Register now.

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I'm First: Reach out to and support first-gen college students—

I'm First: Reach out to and support first-gen college students— | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

without reinventing the wheel. Keene State U, which has 40 percent first-gen students, is doing so.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A growing trend? Outsourcing (or crowd sourcing)  niche student affairs programs that are too expensive for a single institution to develop on its own.

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Who Will Reach College Age in the Next 14 Years?

Who Will Reach College Age in the Next 14 Years? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
An Interactive tool.As the U.S. population changes, so, too, will the makeup of American colleges and universities. In the coming years, they can expect to see significant changes in the demographics of their student bodies—and the regions from which students will hail.

This tool highlights those changes, from the national level down to within the more than 3,000 counties in the U.S. See the key takeaways for every county, the trends in changing demographics, population densities, and search for areas with specific demographic attributes. (Related articles: Colleges, Here Is Your Future | Changing Times, Tough Choices)

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Balthazar Acevedo's curator insight, February 4, 2014 9:02 PM

The current underdevelopment and enfranchisement of the Texas Mexican American population, "Tejanos, " will result in one of the unprepared and highly illiterate population in the Western Hemphispher in the 21st century.  This population now comprises the majority of enrollment in public schools in Texas but has one of the lowest participation rates in terms of outcomes: literacy, numeracy, social literacy, techno-literacy, reading and writing comprehension and graduation with college ready skills. It also has one of the highest attrition rates of any ethnic group in America with 38% dropping out before they graduate.

 

Texas is investing much in expanding higher education institutions but that is not the corresponding case in terms of funding for public schools.  This inbalance will create a situation where there will be a diminishing return on investment as fewer Mexican Americans will be capable of attending these colleges and universities.

 

The research that I am currently conducting is directed at understanding how Tejanos must be prepared to assume competitive leadership roles, either elected or appointed, in elected or appointed offices so that can have a say-so in how policy is brokered and resources allocated to expand the capacity of this most endangered ethnic population.

 

 

 

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Law school enrollment is collapsing

Law school enrollment is collapsing | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The life of a budding American lawyer isn't what TV shows like "L.A. Law" once made it out to be. Fresh numbers from the American Bar Association show US law school enrollment tumbling 11% over last year to 39,675.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Many fewer people investing in the LSAT, as well.

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U.S. Private Colleges Face Enrollment Decline

U.S. Private Colleges Face Enrollment Decline | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Many U.S. private colleges and universities are responding to declining enrollments with closures, layoffs, cutbacks, mergers and new recruitment strategies.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

From 2010 through 2012, freshman enrollment at more than a quarter of U.S. private four-year schools declined 10% or more, according to federal data The Wall Street Journal analyzed. From 2006 through 2009, fewer than one in five experienced a similar decline.

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Great News: College Enrollment Is Down « The Dish

Great News: College Enrollment Is Down « The Dish | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Terry Hartle of the American Council on Education is also heartened by the news:


Higher education enrollment has risen over the last 20 years, Hartle says, but the trend is counter-cyclical. During bad economies, people rush to finish a degree or pick up new skills. That’s why 2007 and 2008 saw a 13 percent increase in enrollment, the biggest jump in 25 years. The half-a-million person drop sounds big, he says, but it’s really just a return to normalcy. “Enrollment tends to level off or fall when the economy is improving,” he says. “Given how much enrollment surged during the economic downturn, a reduction was inevitable.”
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Are we ready for this?

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