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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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The 2018 Mindset List | 'Their collection of U.S. quarters has always celebrated the individual states.'

"1. During their initial weeks of kindergarten, they were upset by endlessly repeated images of planes blasting into the World Trade Center. ...

13. Women have always attended the Virginia Military Institute and the Citadel. ...

22. Students have always been able to dance at Baylor."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We wait for this every year. This descrbes the world our incoming freshman class has lived their entire lives in.

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The Next America: ... the Looming Generational Showdown | Three POVs from Higher Ed - YouTube

Three authors for the journal Planning for Higher Education share their takes on Paul Taylor's book. Taylor will be at higher education's premier planning event, "Plan for Transformation in Higher Education," in Pittsburgh, July 12–16:

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Our guests for this video Planning Interview were SCUPers Linda Baer, Marie Gardner, and James Morisson.

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Five SCUPers Take on "The Next America" Book • today at 2 pm Eastern

Five SCUPers Take on "The Next America" Book • today at 2 pm Eastern | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Watch a live video hangout with five SCUPers, each of who is reviewing Paul Taylor's new book, A Demographic Look at the Near Future: The Next America."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Each has read the book and has taken their own view on its contents and what the changing demographics mean for higher education. 

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The America of the near future will look nothing like the America of the recent past.

The America of the near future will look nothing like the America of the recent past. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Drawing on Pew Research Center’s extensive archive of public opinion surveys and demographic data, The Next America is a rich portrait of where we are as a nation and where we’re headed—toward a future marked by the most striking social, racial and economic shifts the country has seen in a century.
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Trends— Why Not a Three-Day Work Week?

Trends— Why Not a Three-Day Work Week? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

One of the world's richest men, Carlos Slim, recently "proposed that the standard work schedule worldwide should be trimmed to three days a week. The current arrangement, he pointed out, was developed when life expectancy was lower and the world was, as a whole, poorer. Now, with people living longer and the structure of society shifting accordingly, a four-day weekend would improve quality of life, promote the development of other occupations, and healthier and more productive employees. Slim’s proposal included two important caveats: employees would work longer hours each day, and would continue to work into their seventies. (At Slim’s own company, Telmex, he is allowing workers past retirement age to keep working four-day weeks, at full salary.)"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Something's got to give. There aren't enough jobs.

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The Next America: ... the Looming Generational Showdown | Three POVs from SCUP

Three authors for the journal Planning for Higher Education share their takes on Paul Taylor's book. Taylor will be at higher education's premier planning ev...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

As always, it was a great conversation, with much emphasis on faculty change.

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What Scandinavia Can Teach U.S. Teens About Coming of Age. Maybe.

What Scandinavia Can Teach U.S. Teens About Coming of Age. Maybe. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Imagine a weekly experience framed up by a cross-partisan array of educators and parents in which young people at the age of 14 or 15 would spend a year in guided learning about the values ... and hard skills of citizenship in America. Instead of shying away from the controversial stuff, in the way that tentative public schools have, it would lean right into the arguments. Indeed, it would present American civic identity as a series of arguments over the meaning, application and priority of principles like freedom, equality, justice, and opportunity.


There could also be elements of service and contribution, in the same way that in most religious rites of passage young people have to prove through good works that they have absorbed the lessons."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Maybe. This is, we think, more cogent:


The latest Pew survey, released last week, tells us that Millennials are as pigeonhole-resistant as ever: individualistic yet networked, socially liberal yet mistrustful of others, pessimistic about the economy yet optimistic about the future.


Overlooked in most dissections of these findings, though, was a cruel fact: young people aren’t so young anymore. The Pew report was titled “Millennials in Adulthood,” and the cohort we once imagined as helicopter-parented kids now ranges from 18 to 33. That means not only that this massive generation is growing up but also that a new as-yet-unbranded generation of truly young folks is arriving.

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Where the Good and Bad Jobs Will Be, 10 Years From Now

Where the Good and Bad Jobs Will Be, 10 Years From Now | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The places creative, service, and working class jobs will grow the most by 2022." Another graph shows the "growth of jobs in America across three broad occupational classes – the creative class, service class, and working class – over the past half century. The trend could not be clearer. Working class jobs, which include those in factory production, construction and transportation, have declined from half the workforce to about 20 percent.


High-paying, knowledge-based creative class jobs in science and technology, business and management, the professions, arts, media, and entertainment have increased from just 15 percent of jobs to more than a third. Lower-paying service jobs in fields like retail sales, food prep, and personal care have increased from 30 percent to nearly half of all jobs."

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Tim Reeder's curator insight, March 1, 2014 10:12 AM

What is your career plan for the next 10, 20, 40 years? Do you have one? People are living longer & working longer. Good jobs will continue to get more scarce, especially for the "working class." Continuing education and long-term planning are a must.