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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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The California Community Colleges' Research and Planning Group's Conference Proceedings

The California Community Colleges' Research and Planning Group's Conference Proceedings | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The California Community Colleges' 2014 Research & Planning Conference proceedings (conference materials) are available for many sessions. Examples of session titles include: 


Presentation provides an overview, tools and examples of a 360-degree feedback approach to the evaluation of integrated planning processes.


Presentation introduces an integrated planning protocol developed and implemented by Yuba CCD and how faculty are engaged in the process.


Presentation explores the concerns and costs associated with students taking longer than necessary to finish a degree.
Presentation shares College of the Canyons’ online program planning and review system fully integrates department planning with budget development and college-wide strategic planning, including embedding SLOs into the online system. 
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The RP Group does quality work, almost always sharing it with the rest of the world. Thanks.

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Data Matters: Per-Student Spending Stays Flat at Community Colleges - AACC 21st Century Virtual Center

Data Matters: Per-Student Spending Stays Flat at Community Colleges - AACC 21st Century Virtual Center | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A closer look at full-time equivalent student spending at U.S. community colleges compared with other sectors of higher education.
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Can Community Colleges Continue to Do More With Less?

Can Community Colleges Continue to Do More With Less? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In Short

  • Cost-cutting policies have hurt community college student outcomes and weakened the capacity of those colleges to produce returns to students and taxpayers.

  • Many colleges are instituting reforms to help more students graduate with useful credentials. While these lower the cost per completion (and thus increase college efficiency), they increase expenditures per student.

  • The emphasis of policy and practice moving forward should be on improving efficiency: the cost per completion of a high-quality credential.

  • The quality of that credential can be monitored in part by tracking graduates' employment, income, and further education.

  • But such monitoring should not be used to rank colleges, which operate under differing local circumstances."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Good read.

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What Do Excellent Community Colleges Do?

What Do Excellent Community Colleges Do? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
What Do Excellent Community Colleges Do?— Josh Wyner administers the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. This is an excerpt from his new book, What E…
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Establishing an organization that continuously drives toward excellent student outcomes also requires intentional efforts to build a strong culture. I have yet to see an exceptional community college that was built solely through the adoption of isolated programs. Nowhere is this more apparent than at Valencia College, in Orlando, Florida. Valencia has built a faculty professional development process–including a unique tenure system–entirely around improving student learning in the classroom.


Most tenured faculty have come through this system, so there is now a pervasive culture built around professors and staff analyzing and adapting their practice to improve student outcomes.  


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Stephen Joel Trachtenberg suggests that 4-year institutions award associates degrees ...

to students who get two years of classwork but fail to complete the bachelors degree: "[A]s Kent State University has recently proposed, it is time for the Academy (with its capital A) to adjust its ways, to re-examine its degree policies and to turn failure into success. Let’s reward students for what they have done, not what they failed to do. Let’s allow them to readjust their lives, to take the AA degree out into the marketplace, to join the work world. Let’s commend the positive, not stress the negative."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We like this idea a lot. What do you think?

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Report: The Economic Impact of Community Colleges

"In 2012 alone, the net total impact of community colleges on the U.S. economy was $809 billion in added income, equal to 5.4 percent of GDP. Over time, the U.S. economy will see even greater economic benefits, including $285.7 billion dollars in increased tax revenue as students earn higher wages and $19.2 billion in taxpayer savings as students require fewer safety net services, experience better health, and lower rates of crime.


Students also see a significant economic benefit. For every one dollar a student spends on his or her community college education, he or she sees an ROI of $3.80."

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For Two-Year Colleges, a Chance to Grant More Four-Year Degrees

Ahead of the 2015 legislative session, momentum seems to be building for more two-year institutions to get a chance to offer four-year degrees.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A growing trend, yes, but not a huge thing:


"Shirley A. Reed, the president of South Texas College, said that offering bachelor’s degrees for nearly the last decade had not caused her institution to stray from its mission.


Noting that baccalaureate students only represent 2.3 percent of enrollment at the three community colleges in Texas that offer the degrees, she said, 'The tail is not wagging the dog.'"

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Selective Admissions to Community Colleges?

"In my darker moments, I wonder if community colleges are too egalitarian, or utopian, for a culture that has forgotten that a significant middle class is a human construct, rather than a natural law. I’d be up for a principled moral argument about whether we want a political economy that’s more like Sweden or more like Brazil. Let’s have that argument, and have it honestly.  But let’s not pretend that protecting the poor from their own ambition is for their own good. It isn’t. They know better. That’s why they’re here."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

What do you think?

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Community College Transfers Can Thrive at the Nation’s Best Colleges and Universities

Community College Transfers Can Thrive at the Nation’s Best Colleges and Universities | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation finds that many low-income students who excel in community colleges will continue to excel if given the chance to transfer to highly selective four-year colleges. Despite academic success at the community college level, lower-income students have a difficult pathway to navigate to get to elite institutions, and such institutions have not been looking in the right places nor making it easy for academically qualified students to gain access. Foundation Vice President Emily R. Froimson outlines ways institutions can find and prepare students and support them through and after transfer. "

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Community colleges continue growth in online classes but join general move away from MOOCs

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A nice report from the Instructional Technology Council from a survey of its membership.

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Community College Student Opinion Questionaires—Public Data or Not?

"As a Washtenaw County resident, I see myself as an investor. My tax dollars are an investment to my community, not a transaction of currency for goods or service.


When I pay my taxes, I expect that the money is used for upkeep and as an investment in my community, and that is how I feel about WCC as an institution. By my money going to the college, I hope that more people recognize Washtenaw County as a place they want to live, which improves my property value, much the same as good roads, parks and primary schools would do.


As a taxpayer, I care little about the individual student, but care about the overall performance of the college – over which residents vote in trustees to manage.


As a student, it is absolutely essential that students have access to SOQs to make sure they get the best for their tuition dollar. But there is no reason SOQs shouldn’t be made public for taxpayers as well, since it is their dollars being invested in this institution.


A little bit of transparency might go a long way in keeping the faith in our elected trustees, for if they are battling so hard to keep the SOQs concealed then there must be something to hide. And if there is something to hide, then at the next trustee election the voters might decide they want a more transparent trustee.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting first hand voice of a taxpayer-student.

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