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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Places of Higher Learning Expand Up, Not Out

Places of Higher Learning Expand Up, Not Out | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Two-storey addition on top of Thompson Rivers University building gives B.C. law school sweeping style and space
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Using some additional examples, this also explores the growth in "vertical campuses," in Canada.

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ASLA Launches New Guide to Green Infrastructure

ASLA Launches New Guide to Green Infrastructure | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has launched a new guide to explain the many benefits of “green infrastructure” — designed systems that harness nature to create proven benefits ...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

'The idea that nature is also infrastructure isn’t new, but it’s now more widely understood to be true, according to Nancy Somerville, Hon. ASLA, executive vice president and CEO of ASLA.


Researchers are amassing a body of evidence to prove that green infrastructure actually works: these systems are often more cost-effective than outmoded models of grey infrastructure—a term used for the concrete tunnels created to move water—and also provide far more benefits for both people and the environment.'

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Deferred Maintenance at Canadian Universities: An Update

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This report, published by the Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO), is worthy of a look.


"In spite of the concerns raised the conclusions of the report may be seen as positive. While there has never been and will never be sufficient funding available to instantly eliminate the problem, strategies are indeed available to proactively manage it.


While five specific strategies are enumerated, they can be summarized in a single, overarching consideration" ... .


Too long to post the entire list here.

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Bold buildings: How to integrate new architecture into historic urban landscapes

Bold buildings: How to integrate new architecture into historic urban landscapes | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"When Clemson University unveiled its designs for the Spaulding Paolozzi Center, a "modernist" building meant to house the school's satellite architecture and design division, strong reactions followed. People either loved the building (or at least the idea of the building), or they hated it.

The lovers argued that architect Brad Cloepfil's plans were fresh and light and new and smart, and that the new building would help mix up the landscape, adding aesthetic vitality to the city. The haters insisted that it was ugly and inappropriate, that it didn't fit within the city's prevailing architectural style. 


The controversy, still unsettled, has drawn attention to one of those timeless, fundamental urban questions: whether and how new, modernist buildings should be integrated into a landscape characterized by protected historic structures or dominated by a particular historic style."


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The author also suggests taking a look at Steven Holl's Seona Reid Building, part of the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland.

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Wood-clad University of Tokyo research building explores world of 'ubiquitous computing'

Wood-clad University of Tokyo research building explores world of 'ubiquitous computing' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

“'My goal was the unification of computers and architecture with nature,' said the 59-year-old Kuma.


The research building has three floors above ground and two basement levels. The entire interior is seeded with hundreds of sensors. The advanced sensor network system is sensitive to temperature, humidity, the flow of particles in the air and the presence of people.


Ken Sakamura, professor of information science at the University of Tokyo, was in charge of producing the Daiwa Ubiquitous Computing Research Building project.


“(The ubiquitous networking) technology will be effective in serving our aging society (by allowing people to operate various household tools and equipment without having to move about)," Sakamura said. “And now we can experiment with new ideas right away, using this building.”

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A Century of Campus Planning: Past, Present, and Future —complimentary download from 'Planning for Higher Education'

A Century of Campus Planning: Past, Present, and Future —complimentary download from 'Planning for Higher Education' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
  1. This article was previously published in Facilities Manager magazine as part of APPA's 100th anniversary celebration. 
  2. It is shared here [pdf], for those who are not SCUP members, only through Sunday, August 24.
  3. Share your memories of the last 50 years of higher education planning on SCUP's 50th anniversary page.


"For most of its history, higher education in America was an experience that only the elite could enjoy. As a result, throughout the 19th century, higher education institutions became increasingly steeped in tradition and resistant to change. Things stayed about the same until World War II, which forced colleges and universities to face some huge challenges. For example, in 1944 the G.I. Bill enabled more than two million returning veterans to enter the higher education system.


'Higher education became more accessible and was no longer entirely the domain of the elite or the upper echelon,' says Persis C. Rickes, president and principal with Rickes Associates, a higher education planning firm in Attleboro, Massachusetts. 'Instead, it became the golden ticket to achieving the American Dream.' The nation’s higher education system was greatly challenged by this surge of students—in response, many institutions expanded facilities quickly, cheaply, and with minimal planning. ...


Going forward, most experts agree the pace of change will accelerate dramatically. Financial challenges, both capital and operational, will be the key drivers of facility planning in the future.


'Alternatives to the traditional higher education pipeline, such as badges and "unbundling," will lead to a reconceptualization of what it means to obtain a degree,' notes Rickes. 'While the residential collegiate experience will remain viable for some institutions, many others will be challenged to explore ways to reposition themselves in order to remain competitive, doing more with less.'”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
MILESTONES IN CAMPUS AND FACILITIES PLANNING

1860s: Morrill Act of 1862 (Land-Grant School Act)

1890s: Columbian Exposition (showed America how beautiful and functional a planned campus can be)

1940s: World War II and the G.I. Bill

1940s–1950s: Colorado and California create space guidelines in an attempt to control and optimize campus space

1950s: Creation of the Western Interstate Commission of Higher Education (WICHE)

1950s: Brown vs. Board of Education eliminated segregated educational institutions

1960s: Richard P. Dober published his landmark book, Campus Planning

1960s: Higher Education Act of 1964 (created more access to higher education)

1970s–present: Widespread use of cars on campus (traffic and parking have enormous impacts on the campus environment)

1990s–present: Widespread adoption of the Internet and distance learning

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Gregory A. Smith's curator insight, August 20, 2014 11:34 AM

This article provides a bird's eye view of factors have impacted college and university planning over the past century.

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"Building Excellence from the Ground Up: Stony Brook at 50 Years, October 24

"Building Excellence from the Ground Up: Stony Brook at 50 Years, October 24 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

This symposium will reflect on Stony Brook University's rapid development into a leading public research university, examine several initiatives that have transformed the Stony Brook campus, and discuss its challenges and opportunities in maintaining a research university for the coming decades.


Learning Outcomes:


  1. Review the development history of the campus, a process characterized by growing enrollments, rapid expansion, and continuous improvement to deepen an understanding of how to foster academic excellence in a public university.
  2. Discover how an institution reinvented itself from a rough-at-the-edges campus, through site restoration, environmental sustainability and energy reductions into a more sustainable environment.
  3. Investigate various methods used to maintain, renew, re-purpose, or replace ageing research facilities to better support modern scientific effort and contrast results obtained from the different approaches.
  4. Recognize how campus life and residential programs shape the quality and character of campus experience, thereby impacting student achievement, student engagement, student retention rates, and their lifelong associations with a newly creating university.


Register Now

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

[na]

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Architectural design and physical activity: Staircases Versus Elevators Versus Attractive Staircases

Architectural design and physical activity: Staircases Versus Elevators Versus Attractive Staircases | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

The indoor built environment has the potential to influence levels of physical activity. However, the extent to which architectural design in commercial buildings can influence the percentage of people choosing to use the stairs versus elevators is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if buildings with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases result in a greater percentage of people taking the stairs.

METHODS:

Direct observations of stair and elevator use were conducted in 3 buildings on a university campus. One of the buildings had a bank of 4 centrally located elevators and a fire escape stairwell behind a steel door. The other 2 buildings had centrally located staircases and out-of-the-way elevators.

RESULTS:

The percentage of people who ascended the stairs was 8.1% in the elevator-centric building, compared with 72.8% and 81.1% in the 2 stair-centric buildings (P < .001). In addition, the percentage of people who descended the stairs was 10.8% in the first building, compared with 89.5% and 93.7% in the stair-centric buildings (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of the current study suggest that if buildings are constructed with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases, a greater percentage of people will choose to take the stairs."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Given an attractive staircase as an alternative, many more people will walk both up and down than ride the elevator.

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mehgostar's comment, July 3, 2016 8:52 AM
Elevators reduces the physical activity.http://iranbalabarco.com/home/
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Deseret Residential Towers, Dating to 1964, Will Be Razed at Brigham Young U.

"Brigham Young University will demolish the remaining five buildings in its Deseret Towers housing complex, the university announced in a news release. Five of the seven buildings were constructed in 1964"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Fifty years ago these were new and the Society for College and University Planning did not yet quite exist #scup50.

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Reimagining the Undergraduate Experience: 4 Provocative Ideas

Reimagining the Undergraduate Experience: 4 Provocative Ideas | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Four broad provocations emerged:


The “open loop” university. I mentioned this idea, which imagines the college experience as a series of “loops” over a lifetime, in my column last week. This plan would admit students at 18 but give them six years of access to residential learning opportunities, to use anytime in their life. It would allow alumni to return mid-career for professional development and new students to get real-life work experience.

Paced education. This abolishes the class year and replaces it with adaptive, personalized learning that allows students to move through phases of learning at their own pace. The goal is to help students make better choices about what they want to study and understand their own learning style.

Axis flip. Rather than traditional academic disciplines, the curriculum would be organized around common and transferable skills that could be used over the course of a lifetime. Schools and departments would be reorganized around “competency hubs” so that there would be deans of scientific analysis, quantitative reasoning, moral and ethical reasoning, communication effectiveness, among others.

Purpose learning. Instead of majors, students would declare a “mission” to help them find meaning and purpose behind their studies.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Jeff Selingo will speak Tuesday, July 15, at SCUP–49 in Pittsburgh. Register by July 7 or register on site.

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Sayward Henry's curator insight, July 1, 2014 8:06 AM

My Two favorites here are the Purpose Learning and the Open Loop ideas.  Wow, how empoering would it be for students to feel a self driven purpose for being in school beyong 'getting a job' or because it's the middle class thing to do after high school?

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Architect David Rockwell Sketches Out Ideal Stadium Design

Architect David Rockwell Sketches Out Ideal Stadium Design | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We kind of like the idea of the Big House in Ann Arbor becoming a water park in the summertime.

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Canadian Campus Visionary Ron Thom | Trent University, the Whole Campus as Art

Canadian Campus Visionary Ron Thom | Trent University, the Whole Campus as Art | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Ontario — When Ron Thom was commissioned to design a university in Peterborough 50 years ago, his unique artistic approach set him apart from his Canadian peers – and hasn’t been topped since. Monocle takes a tour around campus.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

It’s an artful blend. 'As you walk through Trent’s campus, you feel like you’ve crept through a hole in the universe where some benevolent dictator has mandated that all architecture should be rendered as art' This is perhaps no coincidence. [nc]

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The Big Data revolution: How data-driven planning and design is transforming project planning

The Big Data revolution: How data-driven planning and design is transforming project planning | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
There are literally hundreds of applications for deep analytics in planning and design projects, not to mention the many benefits for construction teams, building owners, and facility managers. We profile some early successful applications.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUP member and author Gregory Janks provides heft to this Building Design & Construction article, which includes a nice Brown University mini-case study, with data maps. He says: “What we’re trying to promote is more isn’t necessarily better; better is better.”


Janks is author of of the SCUP booklet, Kings of Infinite Space: How to Make Space Planning for Colleges and Universities Useful Given Constrained Resources, and co-author of a recent article in Planning for Higher Education titled "New Metrics for the New NormalRethinking Space Utilization Within the University System in Georgia."


SCUP members can look forward to a follow-up article to "New Metrics": "Formula’s End: The University System of Georgia's Space Data and What it Means," to be published shortly in Planning for Higher Education.


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Australian College and University Projects

Australian College and University Projects | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

College and university reviews and images of architecture, interior, and landscape projects from Architecture Media.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A nice college of images and info from campus planning and design initiatives down under.

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Evidence Based Design Journal

Evidence Based Design Journal | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Issue 01 of the EBD journal is essential reading for anyone developing a new aged care facility, or remodelling an existing one. Containing globally relevant, detailed case studies, evidence based design strategies, and articles about future trends, the Aged Care Issue of EBD Journal will assist you with brief development, design and facility management"

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Excellent articles and a welcome new journal that planners should bookmark.

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JandLInteriors, LLC's curator insight, September 4, 2014 12:43 PM

This is an excellent site for those who are curious about how to relate to their interior design more effectively!

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Making Space for Creativity on Campus, free book download

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The story of the evolution, use, and assessment of the Creativity Centre at the University of Brighton is a valuable resource for campus communities exploring the potential of spaces that nurture creative learning, creative learners. In this posting, the Learning Spaces Collaboratory concisely summarizes some of the key points in the 136-page document, specifically for academic leaders, managers, and administrators.

The Collaboratory has a forthcoming webinar on September 16, "Transforming, Sandboxing, Repurposing Learning Spaces for Nurturing Creative Learning, Creative Learners: Lessons Learned from the LSC Experience."
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Zero Net Energy—From Building Scale to Campus Scale | Planning Webinar 9/30

Zero Net Energy—From Building Scale to Campus Scale | Planning Webinar 9/30 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Interest in zero net energy (ZNE) grows rapidly, but implementation is lagging. This webinar will look at the decision-making factors institutions consider when building a ZNE facility. Is the trend line bending towards greater ambition, or are institutions staying on the sidelines as costs come down, technologies improve, and the daring few pave the way, offering valuable lessons learned? Corporate and institutional representatives will also examine lessons from from Washington University in St. Louis, Cornell University, and Case Western Reserve University. They will offer first-hand experience on specific ZNE installations, both at the small and large scale, and will look ahead to predict what's next. This program will include frequent audience polling and opportunities for questions.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Tuesday, September 30, 2014 2:00 PM–3:30 PM eastern—An interactive look at the trends, technologies, costs, and boundaries impacting Zero Net Energy buildings. Register now!

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Complete this sentence: Restaurants are to food trucks as colleges are to __________

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Are to what? 

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Location, Location, Location. Urban Hot Spots Are the Place to Be [for campuses]

Location, Location, Location.  Urban Hot Spots Are the Place to Be [for campuses] | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

#scup49 plenary speaker Jeff Selingo's latest in The Chronicle of Higher Education: "Unlike homeowners, colleges looking for a better neighborhood can’t simply hang up a "For Sale" sign and move on. Such colleges need to work harder to provide amenities and out-of-the-classroom opportunities for their students. Some colleges are trying to take on the role of a chamber of commerce, revitalizing abandoned properties nearby and helping to cultivate start-ups. Such efforts, though, are often beyond the expertise of campus officials and carry large price tags without an obvious or quick return on the investment."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Hundreds of campuses lose potential students to those in more desirable locations. Since it's really hard to pick up a campus (think American University in Cairo) and move it, Selingo suggests growing the trend to stepping across campus edges and making the neghborhood/city a more attractive one.

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Dynamic Planning Leads to Expanded Growth on Major Campuses #umiami Symposium 9/18

Dynamic Planning Leads to Expanded Growth on Major Campuses #umiami Symposium 9/18 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Recovering from recent economic challenges, three major institutions in the southern region of Florida are creating and implementing dynamic plans for the future that will be the catalyst to both expanded growth on the campuses and increased quality as they strive to meet the growing expectations of students and the changing face of higher education. The University of Miami is expanding, replacing, and renovating all of its existing housing stock through a carefully sequenced nine-year plan. The University of South Florida in Tampa is anticipating the use of a public-private partnership structure for a large scale mixed-use development including more than 2,000 student housing beds.  Florida International University is among the top 10 in national enrollment and number 1 nationally in graduating Hispanic students and has recently opened new student housing on that campus. 


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Another Brick in the Wall? Increased Challenges Face the Physical Campus

Another Brick in the Wall? Increased Challenges Face the Physical Campus | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The problem is that we are entering an unprecedented period when two historic waves of building construction demand capital renewal investments even as resources available for capital are limited by reductions in state funding, decreases in research and philanthropy and debt limits set by trustees. New England campuses built more space from 1960 to 1975 than over the previous 80 years combined. Then many campuses followed with a second construction boom from 1995 until the Great Recession slowed building.


Now, faced with having to do 'catch-up' renovation on the first wave of buildings that are reaching 50 years old and “keep-up” or stewardship on the second wave of buildings, campus administrators are finding there is just not enough money to do both. It is starting to show to even the casual observer."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Good question by the author: "How could we have spent billions of dollars on new construction and renovation over the past 25 years and still see a doubling of the amount of deferred maintenance?"

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The Band Plays On … ‘Cognitive Dissonance Was There for All to See and Hear’

The Band Plays On … ‘Cognitive Dissonance Was There for All to See and Hear’ | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Two distinctly different views of reality were on display at the 2014 Society for College and University Planning conference: traditional and nontraditional – bundled and unbundled. The cognitive dissonance was there for all to see and hear.


The traditional view bundles residential experience with marching bands and the book-lined study. The nontraditional view unbundles all of this, offering credit hours and progress toward a degree without dorms, touchdowns or libraries. This all makes sense as long as they are serving different audiences – different customers interested in different value propositions. When they need to appeal to the same customer this cognitive dissonance will take the f
orm of economic competition to squeeze what Rich DeMillo calls the middle."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

As SCUP board member Jill Morelli, University of Washington, tweeted last week: “@jkmorelli  #scup49 Michael Haggans is really challenging the status quo about the physical impacts of the digitizing of the university.” There are Haggan’s latest, post-conference thoughts at his blog, CampusMatters.net.

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Is There a There There? Online Education and the Future of the Campus

Is There a There There? Online Education and the Future of the Campus | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A Planning Interview with the author of Is There a There There? Online Education and ArchitectureX, from Planning for Higher Education, v42n3 April--May 20...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Live today at 10 am Eastern.

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Interview: Patrik Schumacher

Interview: Patrik Schumacher | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Zaha Hadid Architects' director Patrik Schumacher talks about the global rise of parametric design, the advent of robotics in architecture, and the influence of 'The Matrix' on creating intelligent buildings.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

On the global stage, Patrik Schumacher is recognized as the leading theorist on the rise of parametric design in architecture, and the main oracle predicting it will dominate the next phase of advances by the avant-garde. He famously declared in one manifesto: "There is a global convergence in recent avant-garde architecture that justifies its designation as a new style: parametricism."

Building on techniques developed for digital animation and for computational design in architecture, parametricism, he said, "succeeds Modernism as the next long wave of systematic innovation."

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What's next for Rutgers' 700 buildings and 6K acres of land? University develops master plan

What's next for Rutgers' 700 buildings and 6K acres of land? University develops master plan | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Rutgers' engineering school has developed a tool, called "The Swarm," that tracks students as they move across the New Brunswick and Piscataway campuses on a typical day. The tool - which uses class schedules and housing assignments to predict where students travel on campus during the course of a day -- will show campus officials where students congregate and how the campus bus system is used.


"You can see how they aggregate, what different tracks they take, what are the hot spots by the hours of the day, what buses are they on," Rutgers President Robert Barchi said. "The patterns that come out of this are very interesting."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

SCUPer Antonio Calcado is the driving force in this planning, which is about much more than just timing and transportation.

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