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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Using Predictive Analytics, Adaptive Learning to Transform Higher Education

Using Predictive Analytics, Adaptive Learning to Transform Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Seven universities are working on a year-long planning project to improve student success thanks to $225,000 grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. ...


Each university is working on a number of different strategies, but enough of them have some overlap that they can help each other as they go along. For example, The University of Akron and Portland State University are both working on credentialing knowledge, while The University of Akron and Georgia State are working on adaptive learning, among other things."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Each institution's goal for the grant is briefly described. We think these projects will yield useful lessons learned for others.

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Virginia Curran's curator insight, August 28, 2014 10:00 AM

From www.govtech.com - Today, 7:10 AM


"Seven universities are working on a year-long planning project to improve student success thanks to $225,000 grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. ...


Each university is working on a number of different strategies, but enough of them have some overlap that they can help each other as they go along. For example, The University of Akron and Portland State University are both working on credentialing knowledge, while The University of Akron and Georgia State are working on adaptive learning, among other things."

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Trend— UC Davis's groundbreaking digital badge system could scale well, plays well with regular grading

Trend— UC Davis's groundbreaking digital badge system could scale well, plays well with regular grading | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Sheryl Grant, an expert on badges ... said the badging work done by Normoyle and others at UC-Davis is the most interesting she’s seen in higher education. Grant has helped administer30 badging projects that won a contest and received support from the Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. 


“They really are solving for something that the current credential system is not doing,” says Grant, adding that Normoyle and company are doing so without “upsetting the apple cart” by tossing out the degree.


Grant predicts that UC-Davis’s approach is one other colleges will copy. That’s because, she says, they used a rigorous process to create a badging system grounded in the values of the institution, faculty, students and employers.


The end result, Grant says, is a “data visualization and recommendation system” that is “going to scale really well.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Not everybody is sold on badges, however. One reason is that anyone can award one, raising questions about quality control.

Peter Stokes is executive director of postsecondary innovation in the College of Professional Studies at Northeastern University. He’s supportive of the concept behind badges, and thinks there are no real technical obstacles to making them work. But Stokes remains skeptical of badges having a major impact on higher education, at least for now.


“The big challenge with the badge is to create currency in the market,” Stokes says.

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Essay on changing ideas of time, space and learning in higher ed | Inside Higher Ed

Essay on changing ideas of time, space and learning in higher ed | Inside Higher Ed | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

But, unfortunately graduation does not necessarily mean that a student has learned anything. For graduation to be meaningful it must represent measurable, verifiable achievement of specific learning outcomes, a goal toward which many organizations and institutions are working. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A nice, fairly comprehensive, and definitely useful description of issues and resources related to student competencies. The author, Alexandra W. Logue, is executive vice chancellor and provost of the City University of New York.

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The feds tried to rate colleges in 1911. It was a disaster.

The feds tried to rate colleges in 1911. It was a disaster. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"At the turn of the 20th century, college was for the elite. Less than 3 percent of the US population had a bachelor's degree in 1910; just 14 percent had even finished high school.


Still, the number of colleges in the US had nearly doubled in the previous 50 years.And the new Association of American Universities was confronting a pressing question, according to David Webster, whowrote in 1984 about the early federal rating system in the History of Education Quarterly: When students applied to graduate school, how could universities know how good their undergraduate education was?


So the association did something that would be unthinkable in higher education today. It asked the federal government to step in.

The US Bureau of Education's top higher education official, Kendric Babcock, a former college president, agreed to tackle the question. Babcock thought he could create a rating system for more than 600 colleges that could judge "exactly the worth of the degrees granted by the widely varying institutions in the United States" and be accepted both in the US and abroad as an indicator of quality.


This turned out to be wildly optimistic."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"The uproar made it all the way to President William Howard Taft, who issued an executive order banning the distribution of the ratings developed by his own federal agency. The next president, Woodrow Wilson, who had spent much of his life in academia, let Taft's order stand despite pressure from the Association of American Universities to rescind it."

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Liberal Education | Fall 2013 | Index

Liberal Education | Fall 2013 | Index | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
President’s MessageIf Competency Is the Goal, Then Students’ Own Work Is the Key to Reaching It
By Carol Geary Schneider 
Ultimately, we need to evaluate the “transformative” claims made for any specific innovation—whether digital, face-to-face, or blended—against the evidence of student competency that is (or is not) transparently demonstrated in students’ own portfolios of educational accomplishments.

FEATURED TOPIC


The MOOC Moment and the End of Reform

By Aaron Bady 

There is almost nothing new about the kind of online education that the word MOOC now describes. It’s been given a great deal of hype and publicity, but that aura of “innovation” poorly describes a technology that is not that distinct from the longer story of online education and that is designed to reinforce and reestablish the status quo.


A Plea for “Close Learning”
By Scott L. Newstok 
Some people pushing for MOOCs, to their credit, speak from laudably egalitarian impulses to provide access for disadvantaged students. But to what are these students being given access? Are broadcast lectures and online discussions the sum of a liberal education, or is it something 
more than “content” delivery? 

MOOCs and Democratic Education
 
By Leland Carver and Laura M. Harrison 
If MOOCs are truly on the point of “revolutionizing” higher education, then several important questions must urgently be raised and discussed—questions grounded in core social beliefs about the purpose of education.

PERSPECTIVESExperience Matters: Why Competency-Based Education Will Not Replace Seat Time
By Johann N. Neem
A good liberal arts education is not just about learning to write well or to think critically, or any other specific outcome or competency. Instead, it is also about putting students into contexts in which they are exposed to new ideas, asked to chew on them, and to talk or write about them.

A Troubled Adolescence: What the Fifteenth Birthday of the Bologna Process Means for Liberal Education
By Paul L. Gaston
If the vision of Bologna should prove insufficient to sustain its agenda, the most important accomplishment of the Bologna Process may be its having established a base camp from which a more important climb can begin.

Toward a Field of Interfaith Studies
 
By Eboo Patel
Scholars from a range of fields have long taken an interest in how people who orient around religion differently interact with one another. As the activity in this area increases, one crucial role for the academy is to give some definition to what is clearly an emerging field of research, study, and practice.

A Plea for Civil Discourse: Needed, the Academy’s Leadership 
By Andrea Leskes
Once we accept that students need to become adept civil discoursers—for their own and democracy’s good—how can college education foster this important skill?

MY VIEW

Thoughts on a “Liberating” Education
By Robert A. Scott
Undergraduate education is and must be as much about character and citizenship as about careers and commerce.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A good issue. Lots of addressing of the competency issue.

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'The contributions community colleges make to individual students, local and regional economies, states, and the nation as a whole.'

'The contributions community colleges make to individual students, local and regional economies, states, and the nation as a whole.' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Because of the importance of the content, which should be widely disseminated, SCUP members are sharing these four timely articles from the society's journal, Planning for Higher Education. Anyone can download the pdf file on this page, through Sunday, October 20.


Download your copy now in SCUP's Community Colleges Roundtable.


Contents

  • The Maryland Model of Community College Student Degree Progress by Craig A. Clagett 
  • Expanding College Completion The Challenge of Capacity by Janice N. Friedel, Mark M. D’Amico, Stephen G. Katsinas, and Phillip D. Grant 
  • Local and Regional Economic Contributions of Community Colleges by Trudy Bers 
  • A National Economic Case Statement for Community Colleges by Christopher M. Mullin and Kent Phillippe
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Don't miss this related upcoming SCUP event, November 4 at Lincoln University (PA)— "Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment." There is a great line-up of local speakers and panelists, many from community colleges. Register now!


This one-day workshop focuses on how institutions can ensure that they are achieving their mission through a culture of evidence, and the role of academic quality, continuous improvement and accountability in the accreditation process.


It comprises two consecutive workshops that address tools for integrated planning and assessment and evaluating assessment programs.

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