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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Textbook Companies Are Now Teaching College Classes

Textbook Companies Are Now Teaching College Classes | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
This summer, Chad Mason signed up for online general psychology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. This spring, Jonathan Serrano took intro to psychology online at Essex County College in Newark, New Jersey. Though the two undergraduates were separated by more than 600 miles, enrolled in different institutions,...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"In theory, many of [publisher] courses could easily act as stand-alone products," replacing university courses.


Derived from this: "It’s sensitive terrain for the publishers as well. In theory, many of their courses could easily act as stand-alone products they could sell directly to students who need to fill a social science or math requirement. Pearson PLC could become Pearson U. But the publishers don’t have college accreditation. They need the colleges to turn a course into something that can count toward a degree, and they don’t want to undercut their main market."

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New Directions for Higher Education: Q&A with CAEL’s Tate on Prior Learning, Competency-Based Ed

New Directions for Higher Education: Q&A with CAEL’s Tate on Prior Learning, Competency-Based Ed | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

DiSalvio: Some note that the greatest risk to traditional higher education is the growing interest in competency-based or prior-learning education models. Could you explain the source of this alarm?


Tate: I think the source of the alarm is different for prior-learning assessment than it is for competency-based education. On the prior-learning assessment side, what most people are concerned about is that it will take students away from the classroom. The fear is that it will reduce the participation of students in courses. And further, that the faculty will have less of a role in the students’ education because so much of the learning will be coming from outside the classroom.


The quality question that is frequently raised is: “How do we know that the student really has this knowledge?” But when you get under that question, you find that the concern is really that the faculty will not have the same control over a student’s learning as they would if it were under their auspices in their classrooms, internships or research. So there is some reasonable amount of alarm over faculty loss of control. Usually that makes its way into a quality argument. But it’s often really about the issue of control, rather than quality.


On the financial side, there is fear that prior-learning assessment will diminish full-time equivalent enrollment generation. The financial concern and the faculty concern are very closely related. The financial issue is related to the potential loss of credits—and revenue—generated within the institution. These are legitimate concerns, but what we try to demonstrate is that people, in fact, don’t take fewer credits, but rather tend to take more credits because they stay in school longer and are more likely to graduate. They tend to persist and this means the institution will not lose the revenue.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Good interview. DiSalvio interviews Pamela Tate, president and CEO of the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL).

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New Directions for Higher Education: Q&A with Judith Eaton on Self-Regulation

New Directions for Higher Education: Q&A with Judith Eaton on Self-Regulation | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"What we have currently is a lack of alignment between purposes and expectations. Accreditation was developed as a collegial process, using peer review with a primary focus on quality improvement. That collegial approach has worked for a great many years. While this approach has grown over the past 20 years, in the past five years, there has been, especially from the federal government and some states, an expectation that accreditation should function as a form of compliance with statutes and regulations. I’m referring to the requirements in the law as to what accreditors must do with institutions or programs in accordance with regulatory criteria outlined by the U.S. Department of Education. Institutions are required to document compliance with those regulatory criteria, and accreditors are obligated to consider such compliance when the institution is reviewed for initial membership or continued accreditation."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"It is essential we do not lose peer review and institutional autonomy and academic freedom and mission. Those vital elements in our nation’s higher education enterprise have defined us and have made the U.S. higher education system one of the strongest and most effective in the world."

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One-Quarter of Adults Hold Educational Credentials Other Than an Academic Degree, Census Bureau Reports

One-Quarter of Adults Hold Educational Credentials Other Than an Academic Degree, Census Bureau Reports | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"In this report, we've been able to measure for the first time how many people take another route to a productive career: holding an alternative educational credential independent of traditional college degrees. It turns out that millions of people have taken this path," added Ewert.

These alternative credentials include professional certifications, licenses and educational certificates. The fields of these professional certifications and licenses were wide-ranging and include business/finance management, nursing, education, cosmetology and culinary arts, among others.

The report shows that, in general, these alternative credentials provide a path to higher earnings. Among full-time workers, the median monthly earnings for someone with a professional certification or license only was $4,167, compared with $3,433 for one with an educational certificate only; $3,920 for those with both types of credentials; and $3,110 for people without any alternative credential.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Certification or alternative credentials have the most positive impact for workers with no college or an associate's degree. Nice to have this benchmark. The more we learn the more we have to change.

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One man's mission to save City College of San Francisco

One man's mission to save City College of San Francisco | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The fate of City College of San Francisco, one of the nation's largest community colleges, rests largely on a state-appointed trustee named Robert Agrella.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is a Wall Street Journal article centered on the state-appointed trustee, Robert Agrella, a former community cllege president.

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Transferability of Postsecondary Credit Following Student Transfer or Coenrollment: Statistical Report

The purpose of this report is to examine how often, and under what conditions, postsecondary institutions accept the transfer of credits earned by students at other institutions. It addresses the following questions:
• How often do members of a cohort of beginning college students transfer or coenroll1 between postsecondary education institutions during their undergraduate years?
• How often, and in what amounts, do credits transfer when students move from one institution to another?
• What characteristics of institutions (i.e., control, level, accreditation, and selectivity) and students (i.e., grade point average [GPA] and degree/award level of program) are related to credit transfer?

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

From NCES.

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The feds tried to rate colleges in 1911. It was a disaster.

The feds tried to rate colleges in 1911. It was a disaster. | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"At the turn of the 20th century, college was for the elite. Less than 3 percent of the US population had a bachelor's degree in 1910; just 14 percent had even finished high school.


Still, the number of colleges in the US had nearly doubled in the previous 50 years.And the new Association of American Universities was confronting a pressing question, according to David Webster, whowrote in 1984 about the early federal rating system in the History of Education Quarterly: When students applied to graduate school, how could universities know how good their undergraduate education was?


So the association did something that would be unthinkable in higher education today. It asked the federal government to step in.

The US Bureau of Education's top higher education official, Kendric Babcock, a former college president, agreed to tackle the question. Babcock thought he could create a rating system for more than 600 colleges that could judge "exactly the worth of the degrees granted by the widely varying institutions in the United States" and be accepted both in the US and abroad as an indicator of quality.


This turned out to be wildly optimistic."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"The uproar made it all the way to President William Howard Taft, who issued an executive order banning the distribution of the ratings developed by his own federal agency. The next president, Woodrow Wilson, who had spent much of his life in academia, let Taft's order stand despite pressure from the Association of American Universities to rescind it."

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9 reasons why badges are better than degrees - eCampus News

9 reasons why badges are better than degrees - eCampus News | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Those who once said that digital badges are great ‘supplements’ to a traditional degree are now argue that digital badges are a better alternative.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Some good thoughts and links here. Recommended by Jim Morrisson.

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Essay on changing ideas of time, space and learning in higher ed | Inside Higher Ed

Essay on changing ideas of time, space and learning in higher ed | Inside Higher Ed | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

But, unfortunately graduation does not necessarily mean that a student has learned anything. For graduation to be meaningful it must represent measurable, verifiable achievement of specific learning outcomes, a goal toward which many organizations and institutions are working. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A nice, fairly comprehensive, and definitely useful description of issues and resources related to student competencies. The author, Alexandra W. Logue, is executive vice chancellor and provost of the City University of New York.

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How to Use Project Management Tools to Integrate Strategic Planning Implementation and the Accreditation Cycle

How to Use Project Management Tools to Integrate Strategic Planning Implementation and the Accreditation Cycle | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Connecting Your Institution’s Achievements to Demonstrate a Culture of Compliance," by Susan Paraska, director of institutional effectiveness at Kennesaw State University, presents a method for integrating strategic plan implementation and the planning requirements of the accreditation cycle using project management tools.


This Planning for Higher Education article can be downloaded from this page only through Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Jan Lubin's curator insight, June 24, 2013 12:24 AM

This planning process should help anyone involved with the current accreditation process.