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Using Predictive Analytics, Adaptive Learning to Transform Higher Education

Using Predictive Analytics, Adaptive Learning to Transform Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Seven universities are working on a year-long planning project to improve student success thanks to $225,000 grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. ...


Each university is working on a number of different strategies, but enough of them have some overlap that they can help each other as they go along. For example, The University of Akron and Portland State University are both working on credentialing knowledge, while The University of Akron and Georgia State are working on adaptive learning, among other things."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Each institution's goal for the grant is briefly described. We think these projects will yield useful lessons learned for others.

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Virginia Curran's curator insight, August 28, 2014 10:00 AM

From www.govtech.com - Today, 7:10 AM


"Seven universities are working on a year-long planning project to improve student success thanks to $225,000 grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. ...


Each university is working on a number of different strategies, but enough of them have some overlap that they can help each other as they go along. For example, The University of Akron and Portland State University are both working on credentialing knowledge, while The University of Akron and Georgia State are working on adaptive learning, among other things."

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'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.'

'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Love this.


"It wasn't our intent, I just want to be clear about that now, it was not our intent to destroy universities. That's not why we did it. We want to change universities, and we want them to work for the better.

Thinking in Models: for Design, for Learning…

A large part of this talk is about that change. It's interesting. We go from the first slide about people wanting to be relevant, wanting universities to be relevant, all the way to the last slide about what's going to replace universities, without doing all the thinking that we need to do in between. We need to do this thinking in between.

Let's begin our thinking with where the current trends, we're told, are going. We're told there will be tiered service models at universities. We're told there will be analytics and data-driven management. We're told there will be alternative credentials. To a certain degree, all of these three things are true.

To a certain degree, none of these three things are going to work themselves out in the way that the economist or economists or education reformers predict. When you look at that, basically it's like they have this model or design in their head of how we could rebuild the university system, wipe it all out, start over, and we'll have a new model.




Figure 1 - workflow process employed to assist LMS selection

This model of accountability and cost frameworks and all of that will solve all the problems that the current system has. Models are popular in education too. Here's a model (Figure 1) of a workflow-processed employee to assist LMS selection. You can't really read the small writing there. It goes from enrollment to program administration to learner interactions to content creation to assessment.

It's a fishbone diagram. If you're in economics or business, you're probably familiar with it.Models of how to select educational technology including customized lists of LMS features, a way of picking among those 305 features of a learning management system that you might want to solve the educational problems at your institution."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

You really need to read this. Or at least skim it. This is not your ordinary POV. "I criticize Coursera. I criticize the Stanford MOOCs and all of that, but when Norvig and Thrun launched their artificial intelligence MOOC, in the first week, 150,000 people signed up. Overall, I think it was something like 250,000 people signed up for one course, a really hard course that's really difficult to understand, in artificial intelligence.


Forget the fact that a lot of them dropped out. A lot of them didn't. Tens of thousands finished. This, by itself, indicates that the old model wasn't working. There was such a pent-up demand for upper-level university courses in artificial intelligence that, when one was finally made available, people knocked down the doors trying to get to it."

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Learning-Centric Data Scientists to Take Over Higher Ed

"Instructional designers were yesterday’s hot new member of the course development team. Today, the must-have course development team member (along with faculty and instructional designers and media specialist and librarians) is the data scientist.

And not just any data scientist.  A data scientist who is also an expert in program assessment.  A data scientist who is also a learning geek, steeped in all things Bloom and constructivist.

Maybe these learning-centric data scientists have always been wandering around campus.  Hanging out with the good people in Institutional Research, ensconced over at the Ed School.

From here on out the learning-focused data scientists are the new superstars.  The cool kids.  The big women and men on campus."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Well, not really. But they are one symptom of drastically changing times. "This is a shift away from the model of a solo professor creating / delivering / evaluating each course to a team-based and data-centric teaching model."

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Business School, Disrupted

Business School, Disrupted | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
In moving into online education, Harvard Business School discovered that it isn’t so easy to practice what it teaches.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Intriguing, with twists. One of the best articles we've read in a while that has, as its background, what's on-the-gound-happening at the leading edge.


“Harvard is going to make a lot of money,” Mr. Ulrich predicted. “They will sell a lot of seats at those courses. But those seats are very carefully designed to be off to the side. It’s designed to be not at all threatening to what they’re doing at the core of the business school.”

Exactly, warned Professor Christensen, who said he was not consulted about the project. “What they’re doing is, in my language, a sustaining innovation,” akin to Kodak introducing better film, circa 2005. “It’s not truly disruptive.”

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Three Pieces of the Puzzle: Instructional Content and Online Higher Education | Acrobatiq

Three Pieces of the Puzzle: Instructional Content and Online Higher Education | Acrobatiq | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
However, talk of online education's current "transformative", "revolutionary" and (worst of all) "disruptive" impact on traditional higher education ignores the
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The problems with instructional content stem from how courses are created. In most non-profit colleges and universities, the responsibility for the design and development of instructional content continues to fall to under-resourced and typically ill-prepared individual faculty members. The service departments set up in most institutions to support online learning have not substantially changed this fundamental division of labor. Instructional design professionals in these departments – despite their skills – are forced into secondary roles, often pushed toward providing technical training (“How to Set Up Quizzes in Blackboard”), rather than actually working with course instructors to design instruction. The funds available for course development are severely limited to what can be reasonably generated by way of tuition revenue (minus direct expenses) over a few semesters. And incentive systems of traditional colleges and universities make it illogical for faculty to spend excessive time developing instructional content, even if they had the wide range of skills necessary for this kind of work. There are exceptions to this state of affairs, but too few.

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Corporate cash alters university curricula

Corporate cash alters university curricula | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
More companies are entering partnerships with colleges to help design curricula, as state universities seek new revenue and industry tries to close a yawning skills gap.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

"The University of Maryland has had to tighten its belt, cutting seven varsity sports teams and forcing faculty and staff to take furlough days. But in a corner of the campus, construction workers are building a dormitory specifically designed for a new academic program.

Many of the students who live there will be enrolled in a cybersecurity concentration funded in part by Northrop Grumman Corp. The defense contractor is helping to..."

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karenmr's comment, April 10, 2014 1:24 PM
Full article is blocked by WSJ.
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What Steve Blank Learned By Flipping the MOOC

What Steve Blank Learned By Flipping the MOOC | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Two of the hot topics in education in the last few years have been Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and the flipped classroom. I’ve been experimenting with both of them.


What I’ve learned (besides being able to use the word "pedagogy" in a sentence) is: 1) assigning students lectures as homework doesn’t guarantee the students will watch them and 2) in a flipped classroom you can become hostage to the pedagogy.


Here’s the story of what we tried and what we learned.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is a unique perspective on some hot-topic aspects in learning, part of the innovation and creativity that has been spurred by MOOCs. Perhaps not an intended outcome, but a welcome one. The author does a decent job of explaining the iterative improvements (planning process) in his course design.


STEVE BLANK is a retired Silicon Valley serial entrepreneur turned educator who developed the Customer Development methodology that changes the way startups are built. His book The Four Steps to the Epiphany launched the Lean Startup movement.
@sgblank

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2013— The 'year that online education fell back to earth'?

2013— The 'year that online education fell back to earth'? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

In theory, students saddled by rising debt and unable to tap into the best schools would be able to take free classes from rock star professors at elite schools via Udacity, edX, Coursera and other MOOC platforms.


But if 2012 was the "Year of the MOOC," as The New York Times famously called it, 2013 might be dubbed the year that online education fell back to earth. Faculty at several institutions rebelled against the rapid expansion of online learning — and the nation's largest MOOC providers are responding.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

During the holidays, Eric Westervelt covered the year in online education quite well. Sebastian Thrun: "Online education that leaves almost everybody behind except for highly motivated students, to me, can't be a viable path to education. We look back at our early work and realize it wasn't quite as good as it should have been. We had so many moments for improvement."

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The potential of community-based sustainability projects for deep learning initiatives

This paper provides and illustrates a generic framework for deep learning in a Sustainability-based course for higher education instruction. The use of Sustainability Consulting Projects is detailed with potential application to similar programs as part of their Sustainable Education curriculum. Using four disparate institutions of higher learning across the eastern coast of the United States we can complete an exploratory analysis of the framework. This analysis will provide us opportunity to identify and characterize community sustainability projects and their contribution to higher order, integrative and reflective learning. This deep learning framework and model will be helpful to curriculum developers and instructors who wish to introduce these types of projects into their courses and curriculum. These processes and tools may be integrated into current Sustainability Management courses or used as the basis for development of specific courses focused specifically on this topic; e.g., Sustainability Consulting or as a capstone course. Lessons learned and framework design and implementation provide opportunities for further research and development of these courses.


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

From the conclusion: "The cases from four universities and 85 projects also provided a number of lessons learned with direct implications for practice and research." This paper—and the accompanying themed issue, "Higher Education for Sustainable Development: Emerging Areas" of the Journal of Cleaner Production—is of interest.

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Where Dreams Go to Die—Math Class?

Where Dreams Go to Die—Math Class? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Six core principles guide Carnegie's work. They are:

  1. Make the work problem-specific and user-centered. It starts with a single question: “What specifically is the problem we are trying to solve?” It engages key practitioners early and often as co-developers.

  2. Variation in performance is the core problem to address. The critical issue is not simply what works but rather what works for whom and under what set of conditions. Local context considerations lead to variability in implementation in ways that reduce effectiveness. Aim to advance efficacy reliably and at scale, adapt to local contexts, but test those adaptations to warrant them as improvements.

  3. Observe the system that produces the current outcomes. It is hard to improve what you do not fully understand. See how local conditions shape work processes. Make your hypotheses for change public and clear.

  4. We cannot improve at scale what we cannot measure. Embed measures of key outcomes and processes to track whether changes are improvements. We intervene in complex organizations. Anticipate unintended consequences and measure them too.

  5. Anchor practice improvement in disciplined inquiry. Engage rapid cycles of plan, do, study, act (PDSA) to learn fast, fail fast, and improve quickly. That failures occur is not the problem; that we fail to learn from them is.

  6. Accelerate improvements through networked communities. Embrace the wisdom of crowds.

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Essay on changing ideas of time, space and learning in higher ed | Inside Higher Ed

Essay on changing ideas of time, space and learning in higher ed | Inside Higher Ed | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

But, unfortunately graduation does not necessarily mean that a student has learned anything. For graduation to be meaningful it must represent measurable, verifiable achievement of specific learning outcomes, a goal toward which many organizations and institutions are working. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A nice, fairly comprehensive, and definitely useful description of issues and resources related to student competencies. The author, Alexandra W. Logue, is executive vice chancellor and provost of the City University of New York.

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Education Life: The Disrupters

Education Life: The Disrupters | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Pioneering online upstarts are trying to transform higher education with things like programs intended to make college more affordable and those that dispense with the credit hour and classroom time with a professor in favor of self-paced online...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Anya Kamenetz writes about these pioneering programs in Education Life, The Times’s quarterly magazine about higher education. It’s part of a package of articles that highlight online experiments, including UniversityNowMinerva and University of the People – intended to make college more affordable as well as more convenient by tapping into web-based technology.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 12, 2013 12:41 PM

Disruptive new models have parents as well as prospective students looking and reconsidering.   More bloggers are writing  about the problems with large education debt (bankrupcy exempt.)  Economic cycles threaten to turn higher education into high priced vocational schools.


~  Deb

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Enrollment Woes Push Small Colleges to Be Strategic

Enrollment Woes Push Small Colleges to Be Strategic | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The dynamics that are reshaping higher education pose challenges for small tuition-dependent colleges. But some are finding ways to thrive.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

No innovation is a panacea, of course. Introducing a new academic program isn't cheap. Revamping curricula takes time, and demands considerable cooperation among administrators and faculty members. And even the best plans might not have a lasting impact on enrollment.


Mr. Ries at Concordia suspects that a college can ride the benefits of a signature change, like cutting tuition, for only three or four years. That means college leaders must continuously anticipate their next move. "You've got to be dancing all the time," he says. But that's surely preferable to standing still.

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Making Space for Creativity on Campus, free book download

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The story of the evolution, use, and assessment of the Creativity Centre at the University of Brighton is a valuable resource for campus communities exploring the potential of spaces that nurture creative learning, creative learners. In this posting, the Learning Spaces Collaboratory concisely summarizes some of the key points in the 136-page document, specifically for academic leaders, managers, and administrators.

The Collaboratory has a forthcoming webinar on September 16, "Transforming, Sandboxing, Repurposing Learning Spaces for Nurturing Creative Learning, Creative Learners: Lessons Learned from the LSC Experience."
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Content Licensing Creates 'Existential Crisis' for Libraries

Content Licensing Creates 'Existential Crisis' for Libraries | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Old-fashioned media—books, tapes, CDs, etc.—are governed by the first-sale doctrine, a legal provision that allows a buyer to do whatever she wants with a copy.


The licensing of digital media, however, gives publishers far more power. Instead of selling an album outright, they can sell permission to access its contents for a fixed amount of time. (This is a boon for textbook publishers in particular. Under a digital regime, they may not have to worry about losing sales to students buying used copies.)


The licensing model stands to become the norm as physical media get phased out, says Mr. Hoek. “This isn’t just a music problem,” he says. Anything made of “ones and zeroes” can be kept on a leash.


Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Even as SCUP takes a deep, hard look at how it licenses its knowledge content, that kind of deep, hard look by publishers is worrying college and university librarians:


As more and more books, videos, and sound recordings are licensed and distributed through online-only means, the amount of materials available for libraries to collect is shrinking.


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IT and Academics Don't Plan Together Much, New Survey Finds

IT and Academics Don't Plan Together Much, New Survey Finds | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

From the Campus Technology report: "Campus IT is a disjointed effort at most campuses. For example, in more than four out of five colleges and universities, IT professionals report that they do not regularly develop joint plans with academic departments for IT initiatives. These are some of the results that came out of a survey of 152 higher ed IT people in June by MeriTalk, a government-focused Web site."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

And: "Nearly six out of 10 don't survey academic or research staff on IT needs; and more than six out of 10 lack a catalog of IT services. Perhaps that's why 57 percent of end users view IT as the 'fix it' folks and just 22 percent say IT is considered a 'trusted ally.'"


The survey itself can be downloaded from this website.

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Crossing Thresholds and Learning in Libraries

"Threshold concepts aren’t new. Originally proposed by Jan Meyer and Ray Land, they have been adopted by faculty in many disciplines. Essentially, they challenge us to identify places where students typically get stuck as they wrestle with a way of knowing that they find unsettling and troublesome. These concepts, when grasped, so profoundly change the way students think that they are transformative and irreversible. Meyers and Land also believe them to be integrative, yet uniquely tied to a particular discipline."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Note that word, "integrative."

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Principles for Developing Competency-Based Education Programs

Principles for Developing Competency-Based Education Programs | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Successful models demonstrate that competency-based education (CBE) can fit into existing campus structures, if certain principles are followed:

  • The degree reflects robust and valid competencies.

  • Students are able to learn at a variable pace and are supported in their learning.

  • Effective learning resources are available any time and are reusable.

  • Assessments are secure and reliable."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This article describes work conducted by WGU over the last year, supported by grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the US Department of Labor, to share its CBE model with eleven community colleges across the country.

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Academic Issues: A Conversation with Bob Dickeson | July 2014, Pittsburgh, SCUP–49

Academic Issues: A Conversation with Bob Dickeson | July 2014, Pittsburgh, SCUP–49 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Join an unstructured, informal conversation with a leader in American higher education. Robert Dickeson has been a university president, business CEO, co-founder of Lumina Foundation for Education, chief of staff to governors in two states, and consultant to more than 700 colleges and universities. Come with your questions and issues and join Bob Dickeson and your fellow participants in exploring solutions to higher education's most urgent challenges.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Join 1,500+ peers, colleagues, and other experts for higher education's premier planning event.

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An Internal Hydraulic of Change | Theory to Practice

The core chemistry of higher education is transformed if and when the academy and those beyond it understand how a campus’s culture for learning is inextricably linked to multiple and progressive opportunities for engaged learning; the expectation that such engagement should occur for every student; the connection and cultivation of those learning experiences to broad and deep civic understanding and action; and the recognition that those elements of the institution’s commitment to higher learning and to its civic expression are fully bound up in treating students as whole learners—persons whose well-being is an objective of the opportunities and encouragement we as educators provide.


This means a transformation in how faculty see and express their basic responsibilities as educators and how students welcome and adopt the expectation of challenging and demanding involvement in their education. It means replacing institutional structures that artificially segment and restrict parts of a whole with integration and common objectives, and altering financial priorities and reward structures so as to provide the conditions needed to reach a tipping point, to have change occur and persist. (emphasis added)

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

By Don Harward, project director, BTtoP; president emeritus, Bates College; senior fellow, AAC&U

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Discussing design models for hybrid/blended learning and the impact on the campus

Discussing design models for hybrid/blended learning and the impact on the campus | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The comments section has many good faculty POVs.:


So we did a little brainstorming. Here are some of things that were suggested in the very short time available (10 minutes or so):

Online

  • foundational knowledge (facts, principles, concepts, ideas, vocabulary, etc.)
  • certain kinds of skills such as knowledge management, knowledge navigation, independent learning, creative writing
  • some elements of clinical practice (e.g. correct procedures, video demonstrations of equipment being used, patient symptoms)

Face-to-face

  • public speaking and facilitation skills
  • consensus-building
  • decision-making
  • problem solving
  • building a closer relationship with/’humanising’ the instructor
  • body language cues from the instructor about what is really important to him/her in the course
  • practical lab skills/operating equipment
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This post by former SCUP plenary speaker Tony Bates received the 2013 Downes Prize for online learning & distance education resources. SCUPers will find it insightful and practical. At the Downes Prize link there are a number of worthwhile runners-up.

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Harvard Launches Deans' Design Challenge to Proactively Change Urban Life by 2030

Harvard Launches Deans' Design Challenge to Proactively Change Urban Life by 2030 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

An entrepreneurial dose of design will soon grace the Harvard Innovation Lab. The i-lab announced Friday the launch of the Deans' Design Challenge, a contest aimed at addressing the challenges facing the world's swiftly growing population.

Design will join the ranks of Harvard's pre-existing Deans' Challenges. One focuses on cultural entrepreneurship, while the other is centered around health and life sciences. Sponsored by 13 deans from schools across Harvard and hosted by the i-lab, the contests' goals have been for students to create cross-disciplinary teams they can tackle social and health issues head-on with.

Between the two competitions, students were awarded a total of $150,000 last semester.

The theme of the inaugural Deans' Design Challenge is "Urban Life 2030." Participants will be tasked with developing tools that will improve the livability of our cities. The world's urban population is estimated to grow by roughly 50 percent in the next 15 years, according to the i-lab, and largely in less developed regions where an influx of individuals could compound the effects of existing transportation, safety, food, water and inequality issues.

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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 26, 2013 3:28 PM

Interesting facts of Urban Life by the year

2030

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Liberal Education | Fall 2013 | Index

Liberal Education | Fall 2013 | Index | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
President’s MessageIf Competency Is the Goal, Then Students’ Own Work Is the Key to Reaching It
By Carol Geary Schneider 
Ultimately, we need to evaluate the “transformative” claims made for any specific innovation—whether digital, face-to-face, or blended—against the evidence of student competency that is (or is not) transparently demonstrated in students’ own portfolios of educational accomplishments.

FEATURED TOPIC


The MOOC Moment and the End of Reform

By Aaron Bady 

There is almost nothing new about the kind of online education that the word MOOC now describes. It’s been given a great deal of hype and publicity, but that aura of “innovation” poorly describes a technology that is not that distinct from the longer story of online education and that is designed to reinforce and reestablish the status quo.


A Plea for “Close Learning”
By Scott L. Newstok 
Some people pushing for MOOCs, to their credit, speak from laudably egalitarian impulses to provide access for disadvantaged students. But to what are these students being given access? Are broadcast lectures and online discussions the sum of a liberal education, or is it something 
more than “content” delivery? 

MOOCs and Democratic Education
 
By Leland Carver and Laura M. Harrison 
If MOOCs are truly on the point of “revolutionizing” higher education, then several important questions must urgently be raised and discussed—questions grounded in core social beliefs about the purpose of education.

PERSPECTIVESExperience Matters: Why Competency-Based Education Will Not Replace Seat Time
By Johann N. Neem
A good liberal arts education is not just about learning to write well or to think critically, or any other specific outcome or competency. Instead, it is also about putting students into contexts in which they are exposed to new ideas, asked to chew on them, and to talk or write about them.

A Troubled Adolescence: What the Fifteenth Birthday of the Bologna Process Means for Liberal Education
By Paul L. Gaston
If the vision of Bologna should prove insufficient to sustain its agenda, the most important accomplishment of the Bologna Process may be its having established a base camp from which a more important climb can begin.

Toward a Field of Interfaith Studies
 
By Eboo Patel
Scholars from a range of fields have long taken an interest in how people who orient around religion differently interact with one another. As the activity in this area increases, one crucial role for the academy is to give some definition to what is clearly an emerging field of research, study, and practice.

A Plea for Civil Discourse: Needed, the Academy’s Leadership 
By Andrea Leskes
Once we accept that students need to become adept civil discoursers—for their own and democracy’s good—how can college education foster this important skill?

MY VIEW

Thoughts on a “Liberating” Education
By Robert A. Scott
Undergraduate education is and must be as much about character and citizenship as about careers and commerce.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

A good issue. Lots of addressing of the competency issue.

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Mellon Foundation Puts Millions Into 'Urban Humanities' | Interesting concept

Mellon Foundation Puts Millions Into 'Urban Humanities' | Interesting concept | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Backed by $2-million from Mellon, Ms. Cuff and her colleagues are essentially trying to start a small urban-humanities department, which will offer certificates to graduate students. So far, the students hail from history, architecture, urban planning, public policy, philosophy, and geography, among other fields.


"We're all people who are interested in urban issues but are dissatisfied with our own discipline's ability to grapple with those issues," says Jonathan Crisman, project director and a core faculty member in the Urban Humanities Initiative.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Thanks to SCUPer Gerry McLaughlin of DePaul University for sharing this, which is of great interest to SCUP members: "The foundation expects to invest up to $15-million in the initial round of projects, which will bring humanities scholars and architects together."

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Are You Working With a Learning Designer? | Inside Higher Ed

Are You Working With a Learning Designer? | Inside Higher Ed | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

My hypothesis is that the ability to collaborate with a learning designer is the single most important determinant of faculty successfully integrating technology into their teaching.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The author asks some good questions, such as:


How are learning designers distributed on campus? Central IT units or in individual schools or departments?

Beyond levels (the number of learning designers), what are the trends in hiring? How quickly are learning designers being recruited to campus? Where is the rate of learning design hiring the fastest? Is there an adequate supply of trained learning designers to meet demand? Are we seeing salaries go up for learning designers based on a growth in demand (and the fact that learning designers can work in academia or industry?)

How is this new platoon (or trickle - I don’t know) of learning designers being paid for? Are campuses shifting resources from system admins (as more platforms are rented from the cloud rather than provisioned locally), or does the hiring of learning designers require new resources?    

Are elements of the existing campus workforce being re-trained to accomplish tasks that we would recognize as those that a learning designer would specialize in?


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