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Strategic Planning at Public and Independent Institutions | Tom Longin

According to Tom Longin, former provost of Ithaca college, the differences between public and independent institutions in terms of strategic planning have primarily to do with whether the planning is taking place at the system level (as with many publics) or on the campus. But the essential principles of planning are the same. More about:
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Tom is a former SCUP president, and former executive editor of Planning for Higher Education. He played a developmental role in the planning of AGB University, AGBU. All of AGBU's contents are on line and viewable by anyone.

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Do tell, 'ACTA’s view of the proper role of trustees is much more muscular than the AGB’s'

Do tell, 'ACTA’s view of the proper role of trustees is much more muscular than the AGB’s' | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"Nonetheless, one element of the higher ed establishment wasted no time in condemning the ACTA report as reckless and wrong-headed.  On August 21 the blog of the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) described the report as calling for “unilateral trustee action” and “activism,” and the “dismantl[ing]” of shared governance. As a matter of fact, the ACTA committee did tip its collective hat to the idea of shared governance in the preface to its report:


Effective board leadership involves not only listening, but also includes acting after due deliberation, even when not everyone agrees.  This does not mean that trustees unilaterally impose their will over the institution.  Rather, trustees need to listen carefully to faculty concerns and become knowledgeable so that they can make highly informed decisions.  When their decisions depart from faculty wishes, they must be able to articulate why that is appropriate.

Even with this caveat, it is clear that ACTA’s view of the proper role of trustees is much more muscular than the AGB’s.  As the catch phrase ACTA is using to promote the study puts the point: “Trustees must have the last word.”  Given the seriousness of the challenges that colleges and universities face, here’s hoping that ACTA’s reform model prevails over the business-as-usual attitude exemplified by the AGB blog post.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The ACTA "tipped its hat" to shared governance in its preface. Bottom line, though: "Trustees must have the last word.”

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