SCUP Links
247.7K views | +11 today
Follow
SCUP Links
Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

The For-Profit Postsecondary School Sector: Nimble Critters or Agile Predators?

The For-Profit Postsecondary School Sector: Nimble Critters or Agile Predators?
David J. Deming, Claudia Goldin, Lawrence F. Katz
NBER Working Paper No. 17710
Issued in December 2011
NBER Program(s): CH ED LS

"Private for-profit institutions have been the fastest growing part of the U.S. higher education sector. For-profit enrollment increased from 0.2 percent to 9.1 percent of total enrollment in degree-granting schools from 1970 to 2009, and for-profit institutions account for the majority of enrollments in non-degree granting postsecondary schools. We describe the schools, students, and programs in the for-profit higher education sector, its phenomenal recent growth, and its relationship to the federal and state governments. Using the 2004 to 2009 Beginning Postsecondary Students (BPS) longitudinal survey we assess outcomes of a recent cohort of first-time undergraduates who attended for-profits relative to comparable students who attended community colleges or other public or private non-profit institutions. We find that relative to these other institutions, for-profits educate a larger fraction of minority, disadvantaged, and older students, and they have greater success at retaining students in their first year and getting them to complete short programs at the certificate and associate degree levels. But we also find that for-profit students end up with higher unemployment and “idleness” rates and lower earnings six years after entering programs than do comparable students from other schools, and that they have far greater student debt burdens and default rates on their student loans.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

For-profit group's new leader calls for self-regulation and collaboration | Inside Higher Ed

"Steve Gunderson is determined to stay positive as the leader of for-profit colleges’ primary trade group. It won’t be easy." The title link is to Inside Higher Ed. Here's a similar story in The Chronicle.


A tough job, at a tough time. We hope he'll share some of those challenges and opportunities with us at SCUP–47 in Chicago, in July.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

For-profit-college group taps Steve Gunderson as next president | Inside Higher Ed

For-profit-college group taps Steve Gunderson as next president | Inside Higher Ed | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The Association of Private Sector Colleges is set to name Steve Gunderson, a former Republican congressman, as its next president, the for-profit trade group confirmed over the weekend.


Gunderson will bring a reputation as a bridge-builder to the post, somewhat of a departure for the association, whose previous president, Harris Miller, was pugnacious with the industry's critics on Capitol Hill and elsewhere.


The former Wisconsin Representative has long been an advocate for traditional higher education. He was a finalist for the presidency of the University of Wisconsin System in 2004, and has spoken at conferences hosted by college groups that don't often see eye-to-eye with for-profits, including the American Association of Community Colleges and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. He also did consulting work for the American Council on Education."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Too Big To Fail: The Role of For-Profit Colleges and Universities in American Higher Education | Change Magazine - November-December 2011

Too Big To Fail: The Role of For-Profit Colleges and Universities in American Higher Education | Change Magazine - November-December 2011 | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

This broadly encompassing look at the rise in for-profit postsecondary education will be the best on that topic that you will read this year. It is a perfect background piece from which to look at the near future.


William G. Tierney in Change magazine: "If we agree that increased participation in higher education is critical for the country's economic and social well-being and we acknowledge that 1) the public sector is unlikely to increase its enrollments significantly and 2) the private non-profit sector is not able to meet the ambitious goals that have been set, what alternatives exist other than to ensure that the for-profit sector expands in a way that conforms to ethical industry standards?


Like it or not, the country needs the for-profit sector to ensure economic viability. If we concur, either begrudgingly or happily, that it has a role to play in maintaining the health of American higher education, then what are the key sticking points that ensure that it will do so responsibly?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Too Big To Fail: The Role of For-Profit Colleges and Universities in American Higher Education by William G. Tierney | Change

Too Big To Fail: The Role of For-Profit Colleges and Universities in American Higher Education by William G. Tierney | Change | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Tierney lays out the background and recent past of for-profit institutions, examines their growth to 12% of the industry, and lays out needed improvements for for-profits' success while arguing that they are a needed part of the higher education system going forward. A good read.


"If we agree that increased participation in higher education is critical for the country's economic and social well-being and we acknowledge that 1) the public sector is unlikely to increase its enrollments significantly and 2) the private non-profit sector is not able to meet the ambitious goals that have been set, what alternatives exist other than to ensure that the for-profit sector expands in a way that conforms to ethical industry standards?


Like it or not, the country needs the for-profit sector to ensure economic viability. If we concur, either begrudgingly or happily, that it has a role to play in maintaining the health of American higher education, then what are the key sticking points that ensure that it will do so responsibly?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Barbarians at the Gate: Welcome!

Barbarians at the Gate: Welcome! | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The tension between commerce and higher education isn’t likely to get less provocative over the next few years. While campuses have become accustomed to having vendors assume responsibility for f...


More thoughts coming from the ASU Education Innovation Summit: "reports from the event note that the majority of participants, and almost all of the speakers were not educators, but entrepreneurs, technology company executives and investors."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Udacity and the future of online universities

Udacity and the future of online universities | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

You know that professor, Sebastian Thrum, who taught a Stanford class with 100,000+ students in it? He's left Stanford and started his own university: Udacity.

At Reuters Blog, Felix Salmon, is dissapointed:


"Stanford was willing to spend hundreds of millions of dollars building a new physical campus in New York City — but it isn’t willing, it seems, to help Thrun build a free virtual campus which could reach the whole world. That’s a dereliction of its educational duty. But where Stanford has failed, surely some other elite university will step in. Thrun is taking a bold step here. Let’s hope he soon gets the support, if not of Stanford, then of some other college. Like Harvard, or Yale, or Oxford, or Cambridge. They’re exclusive places now. But they don’t have to be, in the future."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

What Hacker Apprenticeships Tell Us About the Future of Education

What Hacker Apprenticeships Tell Us About the Future of Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Three hacker schools offer a new model for direct education that sidesteps traditional abstract work and credentialing...


Light on content but interesting comments.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Consumer Advocate Says States Fall Short in Oversight of For-Profit Colleges - Administration - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Goldie Blumenstyk writes in The Chronicle about a new report from the National Consumer Law Center which delineates some structural and resource deficiencies in some stats' management of for-profit institutions. The full report is here, her article at the title link.


"In the 37-page report, "State Inaction: Gaps in State Oversight of For-Profit Higher Education," the authors Deanne Loonin and Jillian McLaughlin identify several states where they say a shortage of state money is hampering enforcement of existing laws, including New York, where institutions in the western part of the state operate "with almost no oversight" because the Bureau of Proprietary School Supervision cannot afford to pay for travel. The report lists five states—Delaware, Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Washington, and Wyoming—where regulators are most "outnumbered" because the ratio of institutions to staff members assigned to regulate them is 70 to 1 or greater."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Enrollments tumble at for-profit colleges | Inside Higher Ed | Is a Reorganization Underway?

Enrollments tumble at for-profit colleges | Inside Higher Ed | Is a Reorganization Underway? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Paul Fain summarizes the year for for-profits, highlighting steep declines in revenues (with tables). The APLU he writes of is the organization working with Walmart.


"Generalizing about for-profits is tough. Each college serves at least slightly different student markets and, as a result, faces a differing set of complex challenges. And there have been exceptions to the declines in new students, most notably the American Public University System, which this week reported a 53 percent increase in new student enrollment, compared to last year.


For the most part, however, the industry’s rapid growth has ground to a halt. And fast enrollment gains, which for years fueled revenue and made for-profit education companies hot properties on Wall Street, probably aren’t coming back any time soon."

more...
No comment yet.