SCUP Links
247.6K views | +37 today
Follow
SCUP Links
Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

The Power of Strategic Thinking | Association of Governing Boards

"A Dartmouth University professor puts the tasks that all organizations must perform into three boxes: (1) a box containing those things an institution does to make its core business as excellent as possible, (2) a box of “selective forgetting” for eliminating activities no longer productive or useful, and (3) a box of innovation for selective experimentation with projects that anticipate the future. Most organizations know how to succeed at the first task, says Vijay Govindarajan, who teaches at the university’s Tuck School of Business and writes on business strategy, but they do not spend sufficient time and intellectual focus on the second and the third. Although Govindarajan makes this argument about businesses, it readily applies to colleges and universities—and the boards that govern them."

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Augustana retreat an exercise in collective governance | Inside Higher Ed

Augustana College president Steven C. Bahls raninto a thorny hedge with his first strategic plan, but has since done leading edge work in the area. Kevin Kiley pictures the governance preparation at Augustana as it prepares for another strategic planning process. In the process he examines shared governance issues from a number of perspectives. Definitely worth a read. ipeds143084

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Belief and Lazy Consensus: Focusing on Governance - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education

When it comes to faculty governance, Jason B. Jones see an analogy to soccer, when a team is dispirited after an unexpected goal by the other side:


"I think there’s a metaphor here that’s related to faculty governance.


The simultaneous erosion of tenure-track positions over the past three decades and the systematic abuse of contingent appointments has, as Debra Lee Scott has recently observed, left professors discombobulated: “We have been deprofessionalized. And by de-professionalizing us, the administration has gained control and silenced the faculty” (via Jonathan Rees).


The quietism of some faculty stems from many sources: the desire not to seem like a crank; misconceiving of the work of the university as “service” rather than governance; deciding to focus on your disciplinary colleagues elsewhere (or online) instead of your institution; a healthy human hatred of meetings–all of these add up to a sort of despair that the faculty can make a difference.


They amount, in short, to a crisis in belief." (Like when the soccer team ... .)

more...
No comment yet.