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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Slow Down! How “Slow Work” Makes Us More Productive

"More broadly, the philosophy of “slow work” challenges the unsustainable practice of doing everything as fast as possible and offers an alternative workplace framework for energizing people and helping people better align their personal and professional priorities. It urges us to punctuate our routines in ways that might initially appear to compromise productivity but actually enhance long-term creativity.


What follows are a handful of practical ways that one can begin to “work slow” in order to more strongly grip short-term demands and feel some creative energy to inspire us for the long-term.

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How to Read ePub Files on Laptops/Desktops and More

All of SCUP's newer books, and newer versions of our journal, Planning for Higher Education, are available in several digital reading formats. One is ePub. This article could be very helpful to you, in becoming able to read ePub files on your computer.


Some of us don't like reading on tiny devices. That's where this article comes in: It illustrates a number of easy ways to read ePubs, including on your laptop or desktop.


If you aren't reading digitally, you will be. 

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Survey finds 2 percent increase in mid-level administrative salaries | Inside Higher Ed

"Most mid-level administrators won't be seeing an increase in purchasing power, however, because the growth in inflation (3.2 percent) outpaced their raises. Consistent with recent CUPA-HR surveys on the salaries of senior administrators and of faculty members, the increases were larger at private institutions (2.2 percent) than at publics (1.4 percent)."

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Amazon.com: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (9780307352149): Susan Cain: Books

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

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Amazon.com: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking (9780307352149): Susan Cain: Books...


Planners can expect a growing trend for stakeholders' groups to expect procedures to get introverts to speak out:


"Introverts prefer quiet, minimally stimulating environments, while extroverts need higher levels of stimulation to feel their best. Stimulation comes in all forms – social stimulation, but also lights, noise, and so on. Introverts even salivate more than extroverts do if you place a drop of lemon juice on their tongues! So an introvert is more likely to enjoy a quiet glass of wine with a close friend than a loud, raucous party full of strangers.


It’s also important to understand that introversion is different from shyness. Shyness is the fear of negative judgment, while introversion is simply the preference for less stimulation. Shyness is inherently uncomfortable; introversion is not. The traits do overlap, though psychologists debate to what degree."

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College Education Worth 10 Years of Mental Agility? "A Sharper Mind, Middle Age and Beyond"

College Education Worth 10 Years of Mental Agility? "A Sharper Mind, Middle Age and Beyond" | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"How to subtract 10 years from your brain’s age?"


According to research, college education is worth 10 years of mental agility. Middle-agers and older up to 75 average mental skills and sharpness equivalent to those of people without college degrees who are 10 years younger.


"The most consistent results involved education.


All other things being equal, the more years of school a subject had, the better he or she performed on every mental test. Up to age 75, the studies showed, 'people with college degrees performed on complex tasks like less-educated individuals who were 10 years younger.'


Education was also associated with a longer life and decreased risk of dementia. 'The effects of education are dramatic and long term,' Dr. Lachman says."


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Want a Job? Go to College, and Don't Major in Architecture

Want a Job? Go to College, and Don't Major in Architecture | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
A look at typical unemployment rates and earnings for new graduates, sorted by what they studied in college.


Humanities majors, once they get some work experience, do remarkably well!

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Did you know that there are Fulbrights for administrators? And other overseas opportunities!

Did you know that there are Fulbrights for administrators? And other overseas opportunities! | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

By George S. McCelellan: An essay that makes administrators dream of a paying "retirement" and international travel! Did you know that there are Fulbrights for administrators?


"Those of us in student affairs routinely encourage undergraduates to travel abroad, offering up a long list of benefits that can be derived from the experience. But we should extend the same advice to student-affairs professionals themselves.


So how do you go about identifying and pursuing career opportunities for international travel or employment?"

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Leadership Crises Ahead | 'Dean Dad' Pointing Out Some Signs

In reaction to Chronicle editor Jeff Selingo’s piece on the graying of college presidents, and the reaction to it, Dean Dad takes a look at "graying" and its relationship to adjuncts.


"[W]e’re reaching the end of the “dump the costs on the next generation” strategy. If higher education is going to remain viable as a mass phenomenon -- I’m not talking about the elites here, since they’ll survive anyway -- it will have to start making choices. That means that we can expect more open conflict, less consensus, and a need for leaders who are willing to make choices. I just hope that the unthinking, ritualistic excoriation that Selingo’s piece generated isn’t indicative of how far we are from being able to start having honest conversations. If we don’t come to grips with the new normal, it will assuredly come to grips with us."

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Survey documents retirement worries of higher ed employees | Inside Higher Ed

If you're planning around faculty or staff who are nearing retirement age, you might plan on them not retiring as soon as you might have planned for:


"Fidelity also found that 46 percent of respondents reported that they will delay retirement past the age of 65 or will not retire at all. The survey attributes this to a bad economy and the need for continued income and health benefits, in addition to employees wanting to stay at an enjoyable job."

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Why do we forget? Is it so that we can plan?

Why do we forget? Is it so that we can plan? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

If "constructing fugure scenarios in our minds is quite remarkable," then planners are quite remarkable. Seriously, how do we "look" "ahead"?


Are humans "The animals who plan?"

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I Moved Your Cheese: For Those Who Refuse to Live as Mice in Someone Else's Maze

I Moved Your Cheese: For Those Who Refuse to Live as Mice in Someone Else's Maze | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

It's not that the mouse is in the maze, it's that the maze is in the mouse. 

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Why MITx may herald the dawn of disruption for higher education

Macquarie University Vice-Chancellor Steven Schwartz Blog (Why MITx may herald the dawn of disruption for higher education http://t.co/NJRNZYGs #SCUP: disruption tsunami on its way...)...


It's pretty simple: "MIT plans to create a not-for-profit body that will offer certification for online learners of MIT coursework. In other words, with MITx there will be structured study leading to a credential." Not from MIT, but from MITx. Worthless, right? Hmm

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The Value of 'Weak Ties' in Your Professional Network | Register for SCUP-47 Now!

Defined as the folks you meet at conferences, etc. (like at SCUP–47 in Chicago, July 7–11):


"Weak ties in a career context were formally researched in 1973, when sociologist Mark Granovetter asked a random sample of professionals how they had found their new job. It turns out that 82% of them found their position through a contact they saw only occasionally or rarely. In other words, the contacts who referred jobs were "weak ties." Granovetter accounts for this result by explaining that your good friends tend to be from the same industry, neighborhood, religious group, etc. Consequently, their information is similar to yours -- a job a good friend knows about, you probably already know about too."

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The Decision: Selecting an architect for your campus | University Business Magazine

The Decision: Selecting an architect for your campus | University Business Magazine | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Architect Allan W. Kehrt provides a useful guide in University Business magazine:


"Any institution contemplating building or renovating a facility will inevitably hire an architect. The process of selecting one is often rushed or overlooked, particularly considering its long-term implications. The architectural firm you hire is coming on board to design something important, likely big, and almost certainly expensive. It better be the right one and you better like it a lot because you will be working together for a substantial amount of time. What the firm produces will become a reflection of you and your institution. Below are the nitty-gritty details and potential pitfalls of the process, starting from the planning that must occur starting with prior to issuing a Request for Qualifications all the way through to the decision process."

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Essay on professorial Traits That Administrators Need to Drop | Inside Higher Ed

Useful reflections in this essay, although it does make one wonder why anyone would want to move from faculty to administration  :)


"Schedule: 'I love the freedom this job gives me to live a balanced life.' Many of those who go into academe do so in part because of the flexibility in schedule that it allows — at least for those who do not have mind-numbingly large numbers of courses to teach. Administrative schedules typically are, at best, 9 to 5, allowing much less flexibility, and further usually require one to show up for events on nights and on weekends.


Reporting Structure: 'No one tells me what to do!'Professors often do not view themselves as working for anyone in particular, other than, perhaps, themselves. They may view themselves as entrepreneurs who create new intellectual enterprises. Although they usually will be under a department chair or head, dean, and so forth, they usually do not view such people as 'bosses' but rather as people who best should stay out of their way (except when they require additional resources). In contrast, academic administrators have clearly defined supervisors, and if they fail to please their supervisors, they may quickly be in trouble or out of a job."

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Boomers heading back to community colleges

Boomers heading back to community colleges | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

A growing number of community colleges nationwide are taking special steps to attract and accommodate students who are 50 and older.


The 50+ Initiative of the American Association of Community Colleges is represented in this USA Today article by Monroe Community College (NY).

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The EDUCAUSE Speaker Concierge Collection

The EDUCAUSE Speaker Concierge Collection | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Let me help you get the most out of your conference speaking experience and deliver fantastic presentations!


This is a nice beginning to a collection of resources for anyone who does a lot of presenting - like planners!

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#alt-academy: Alternative Academic Careers | No Longer "Failed Academics"

"That our culture for many years has labelled these people 'failed academics' is a failure of imagination."


Hear, hear! We have been saying this for years! Many valuable SCUP members have PhDs or other facultyy experience which enhances their contributions in the higher ed admionistrative arena. They are no longer failed academics, but people in viable careers which can sustain knowledge and scholarship in the humanities.


"On the "#alt-ac track" are: administrators with varied levels of responsibility for supporting the academic enterprise; instructional technologists and software developers who collaborate on scholarly projects; journalists, editors, and publishers; cultural heritage workers in a variety of roles and institutions; librarians, archivists, and other information professionals; entrepreneurs who partner on projects of value to scholars, program officers for funding agencies and humanities centers, and many more.


If they are to serve us well, para-academic institutions require a healthy influx of people who understand scholarship and teaching from the inside. That our culture for many years has labelled these people "failed academics" is a failure of imagination.


Those who gravitate toward #alt-ac positions during or after completing graduate study are often driven to set things in motion in the academic environment, and to set things right. Couple the attractive #alt-ac mission of building systems (social, scholarly, administrative, technical) with an exceptionally sorry academic job market, and it becomes clear that more and more graduate students, post-docs, junior faculty, and underemployed lecturers will be stepping off the straight and narrow path to tenure."

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INFOGRAPHIC: Here's How To REALLY Use LinkedIn

INFOGRAPHIC: Here's How To REALLY Use LinkedIn | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Spend 5 minutes with this and you will be persuaded to spend more time in LinkedIn.


When you do, join The Integrated and Well-Planned Campus, SCUP's LinkedIn group. 2,700 participants and growing fast: http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=1714477

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