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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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Art-Science Collaborations—The Future of X by Allison Carruth

This is a brief video on arts-science collaboration, an issue of great interest to many SCUP members. Our North Atlantic Region held an event on this topic in 2010. Here is what associate professor and chair of psychology at St. Edward's University, Russ Frohardt, said about his experience at that SCUP North Atlantic event:


"I have glimpsed the future of successful education in this country. I attended the [SCUP conference] and was provided a sense of clarity regarding the kind of goals, resources and leadership that are essential for delivering successful education in a global community in the immediate and distant future."

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New York U.-Led Consortium Wins City Backing for Research Institute - Administration - The Chronicle of Higher Education

New York U.-Led Consortium Wins City Backing for Research Institute - Administration - The Chronicle of Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Yet another one:


"NYU and the consortium had bid for at least some of the $100-million the city offered but sought a different site, the 460,000-square-foot former headquarters of the New York City Transit Authority, at 370 Jay Street in Brooklyn. But as it did with the Roosevelt Island site—to the chagrin of Stanford University, which abruptly walked away from its bid, complaining that the city was being unfair—New York City exacted a price for the use of its property.


NYU will be responsible for up to $60-million of the costs of relocating police- and transit-authority equipment now housed in the building. NYU will also be expected to complete the renovation by the summer of 2017 and hold the first classes there by September of that year. The city said NYU would receive $15-million worth of unspecified 'benefits'to help offset its development costs in Brooklyn."

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A STEM Without a Bloom (Humanities, Arts) Cannot Reproduce and Sustain

The world of education is somewhat obsessed on the STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math. But they aren’t enough for any student. Here’s why.
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University World News - US: New York campus bid to be innovation capital

University World News (US: New York campus bid to be innovation capital http://t.co/AZgBMJe9 #SCUP: A full article with an international slant.)...


More about the new science campus in New York City.

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Freeman A. Hrabowski | SCUP-46 Video | Shaping the University's Culture for the Future: Vision, Leadership, and Planning

Freeman A. Hrabowski | SCUP-46 Video | Shaping the University's Culture for the Future: Vision, Leadership, and Planning | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Above left, Freeman A. Hrabowski just after being introduced by SCUP president-elect Niraj Dangoria, right, of Stanford University. "Shaping the University's Culture for the Future: Vision, Leadership, and Planning" was the title of Hrabowski's plenary session at the society's anual conference in 2011. Hrabowski is president, University of Maryland Baltimore County. His session energized the nearly 1,500 higher education professionals in attendance.


At the title link are the proceedings from the conference, available to attendees and also to all SCUP members. If you log in as a SCUP member, you will be able to view the entirety of Hrabowski's speech.

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HASTAC: Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory

HASTAC: Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

HASTAC was the recipient recently of a large grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to work on "Badges for Lifelong Learning." Its 2011 conference is at the University of Michigan, Cecember 2-3.About HASTAC: 


"Many people are saying that STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) kills science. You drill kids in STEM and you drill any inquisitive right out of them. What we really need is STEAM--Science, Technology, Engineering, ARTS, and Math. We need to inspire kids with the scientific method, which happens not to be scientific exclusively but, basically, learning where any form of discovery is rewarded and encouraged. We think that is intrinsic to the humanities as well. That's why we invented HASTAC, with its iconic HAYSTACK logo, layering (even if abstractly) the humanities, arts, science, technology together in the collaboratory model."

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STEM to STEAM: Rhode Island

A briefing marking Rhode Island’s commitment to fostering innovation through the addition of Art and Design to STEM education and research.

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Science of Spatial Learning: Nora Newcombe at NCWIT

Science of Spatial Learning: Nora Newcombe at NCWIT | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Great to see this coverage of SILC in US News and World Report, and I’m excited to hear Dr. Nora Newcombe speak at the NCWIT Summit Tuesday of this week.


"Spatial reasoning, which is the ability to mentally visualize and manipulate two- and three-dimensional objects, also is a great predictor of talent in science, technology, engineering and math, collectively known as STEM."

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Science Center open for classes | PointerView.com | Proudly Serving West Point, NY | West Point News and Commentary

The interior windows, which provide a glimpse from the hallways into the laboratories and classrooms, is a unique feature, Hartke said.


“Wherever possible we wanted to place these windows so when cadets are passing by they can look in and see what’s going on inside,” Hartke said. “We got the idea from a study as a way to increase student interest in the sciences.”


If cadets are exposed to more science in action, then they may consider the option of making it their major. Another way to increase the visibility of science is through display cases, which Hartke said will contain various eye-catching science items throughout the facility.


“To me, the greatest excitement there is here—and there’s actually many pieces to get excited about—is ‘making science visible,’” Lachance said. “A lot of the labs and equipment had been buried out of sight in the basement, and people in our own department never knew some of the things we had down there.”

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Utah Universities Are Facing Billion-Dollar Facilities Nightmare

Utah Universities Are Facing Billion-Dollar Facilities Nightmare | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"The problem is compounded by design and structural standards that scraped rock bottom in the 1960s, just as campuses around the country embarked on a massive building spree to accommodate the baby boom surge in college-age adults. These buildings have now reached the end of their relatively short design lives, and proposals are stacking up to replace and renovate them.


Over the past decade Utah schools, particularly the University of Utah, have been grappling with the high cost of cheap construction that was endemic 40 to 50 years ago. Chronic problems include leaky water lines and inefficient ventilation systems that drive up utility and maintenance costs and render buildings uncomfortable, even unusable. The U. and other schools have been spending millions on temporary fixes and repairing leak damage."

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Facilitating Interdisciplinary Learning: Lessons from Project Kaleidoscope | Change Magazine

Facilitating Interdisciplinary Learning: Lessons from Project Kaleidoscope | Change Magazine | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

More good work in the STEM disciplines from PKAL. In Change magazine, Adrianna Kezar and Susan Elrod report out from a PKAL project that engaged a good number of campuses working together to facilitate interdisciplinary learning. Interestingly, from this perspective it's not the the faculty that are standing in the way:


"If interdisciplinary work is to become part of the regular work of campuses, then it needs to be integrated into day-to-day processes besides promotion and tenure review, mentoring, faculty development, and the like. Fundraising, facilities planning, budgeting, program review, strategic planning, and accreditation are all areas in which the PKAL campuses encountered barriers that stalled their efforts.


Campus teams in the post-program survey cited a lack of appropriate administrative processes as one of the most important barriers. Some used strategic planning or accreditation as opportunities to bring up problems that they were encountering in realizing the promise of interdisciplinary learning."

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CONVERSABLE ECONOMIST: Grade Inflation and Choice of Major

CONVERSABLE ECONOMIST: Grade Inflation and Choice of Major | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Very nice summary of recent papers, and a review of 20 years of related information in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, with a review of each related publication.


"A couple of recent high-profile newspaper stories have highlighted that college and university courses in the "STEM" areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics tend to have lower average grades than courses in humanities, which is one factor that discourages students from pursuing those fields. Here's an overview of those stories, and then some connections to more academic treatments of the topic from my own Journal of Economic Perspectives. ...


In short, grade inflation in the humanities has been contributing to college students moving away from science, technology, engineering, and math fields, as well as economics, for the last half century. It's time for the pendulum to start swinging back. A gentle starting point would be to making the distribution of grades by institution and by academic department (or for small departments, perhaps grouping a few departments together) publicly available, and perhaps even to add this information to student transcripts. If that answer isn't institutionally acceptable, I'm open to alternatives."

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From STEM to STEAM to STREAM: wRiting as an Essential Component of Science Education | Psychology Today

From STEM to STEAM to STREAM: wRiting as an Essential Component of Science Education | Psychology Today | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

A further extension of the concept:


"STEM stands for Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics. There is a movement afoot to turn that acronym into STEAM by adding the Arts. Science educators have begun to realize that the skills required by innovative STEM professionals include arts and crafts thinking. Visualizing, recognizing and forming patterns, modeling and getting a "feel" for systems, as well as the manipulative skills acquired in the use of tools, pens and brushes, are all demonstrably valuable for developing STEM capability. And the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) have gotten the message: formal meetings between the two agencies are underway to figure out how to fund productive research and teaching at the intersections between these sets of disciplines.


NSF and NEA also realize that adding the Arts to STEM is not enough. We also need to add the thinking skills embodied in Reading and wRiting. STEAM may condense into a STREAM."

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t.s's curator insight, December 27, 2014 6:16 AM

The importent of  STEM education(and writing as essential component of science education- artical

Lauris Nicholson's curator insight, June 11, 2015 12:17 PM

This model seems a little more holistic than just STEM alone. Whether or not it realistic? .... I hope so.

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Ride the Cole Train: Generating STEAM from STEMs

A blog post by the Chair of Psychology at St. Edward's University, who attended a SCUP North Atlantic Regional one-day conference at RPI last spring:

 

"I have glimpsed the future of successful education in this country. I attended the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) one day conference at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and was provided a sense of clarity regarding the kind of goals, resources and leadership that are essential for delivering successful education in a global community in the immediate and distant future. The most salient articulation of the issues came from Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, the President of RPI, in her keynote address to entitled: The Quiet Crisis: America's Economic and National Security at Risk. When I saw the title of this talk, I was alittle confused as to how this would fit into the theme of the conference, that is, 'Keeping the Arts in the Instruction of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math.' Once the introduction of Dr. Jackson began, the relevance became quite clear (see http://rpi.edu/president/profile.html)."

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