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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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The Creative Walk | Metropolis POV | Metropolis Magazine

The Creative Walk | Metropolis POV | Metropolis Magazine | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

"[W]e know, both intuitively and practically, that socially interactive spaces, furnished with warm materials and rich textures, are beneficial and useful to the people who occupy them. But how do you convince the data-driven person who pays the bills? Buildings cost money. Owners want their dollars to go far. That’s reasonable. It’s because of this that architects are asked to prove that their designs marry performance and efficiency with inspiration and user comfort."

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Gregory A. Smith's curator insight, February 20, 2013 10:00 AM

This is a fascinating piece about designing workplaces to stimulate creativity and productivity. Having recently come through the design phase for a new library building, I have a better appreciation for what we and our architects came up with, particularly in the attributes of our atrium and thoroughfares.

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College as Country Club: Do Colleges Cater to Students' Preferences for Consumption? (PDF)

College as Country Club: Do Colleges Cater to Students' Preferences for Consumption? (PDF) | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

This paper investigates whether demand-side market pressure explains colleges’ decisions to provide consumption amenities to their students. We estimate a discrete choice model of college demand using micro data from the high school classes of 1992 and 2004, matched to extensive information on all four-year colleges in the U.S. We find that most students do appear to value college consumption amenities, including spending on student activities, sports, and dormitories. While this taste for amenities is broad-based, the taste for academic quality is confined to high-achieving students. The heterogeneity in student preferences implies that colleges face very different incentives depending on their current student body and the students who the institution hopes to attract. We estimate that the elasticities implied by our demand model can account for 16 percent of the total variation across colleges in the ratio of amenity to academic spending, and including them on top of key observable characteristics (sector, state, size, selectivity) increases the explained variation by twenty percent.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

An excellent read. As well, the related Inside Higher Ed story by Scott Jaschik, The Customer is Always Right, includes some good analysis and reaction to this paper by other higher education experts such as Jane V. Wellman, a Planning for Higher Education contributor.


For The Chronicle of Higher Education, Scott Carlson writes this up as What's the Payoff for the 'Country Club' College?

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Anne Bosworth's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:13 PM

What else can they do when we've collectively created a culture that insists on college for anyone who wants a good job? Businesses often use a college degree as a tool of exclusion, so more and more people want one. Mix this in with the wider issues of consumer culture, the change from college as intellectual exercise to college as vocational training, and our increasing culture of entitlement and I'd expect nothing but increased demands upon colleges to meet student "appetites."

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PLACE MAKING: Strategic Identity + Creation | March 24–27, Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver

PLACE MAKING:  Strategic Identity + Creation | March 24–27, Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

What kind of place should a campus be? Does it need to be physical? Can it be virtual? What planning ensures the success of a campus? How is place created? Why is place making in higher education important? How does the concept of place transform over time? How do you engage with a place before and after you spend time there? What’s the future of place making? Is it a deliberate process or is it accidental? What kind of investment should be put into place making? How does place interact with learning? Does society influence place or does place influence society? How does a changing demographic affect place? What makes a good place?  

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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, December 28, 2012 4:56 PM

Registration is open. Scholarship are available. Deadline for scholarships is January 14.


Step I is available in conjunction with this event. Scholarships are available.

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Claire T. Carney Library Renovation and Addition | UMass, Dartmouth

Claire T. Carney Library Renovation and Addition | UMass, Dartmouth | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:
"Wrestling with Rudolph: Changing an important complex by a major (but difficult) architect poses both dangers and the chance to keep his work alive."
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PLACE MAKING: Strategic Identity + Creation | March 24–27, Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver

PLACE MAKING:  Strategic Identity + Creation | March 24–27, Auraria Higher Education Center, Denver | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

What kind of place should a campus be? Does it need to be physical? Can it be virtual? What planning ensures the success of a campus? How is place created? Why is place making in higher education important? How does the concept of place transform over time? How do you engage with a place before and after you spend time there? What’s the future of place making? Is it a deliberate process or is it accidental? What kind of investment should be put into place making? How does place interact with learning? Does society influence place or does place influence society? How does a changing demographic affect place? What makes a good place?  

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Registration is open. Scholarship are available. Deadline for scholarships is January 14.


Step I is available in conjunction with this event. Scholarships are available.

more...
No comment yet.