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Curated content on higher education presented by the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP).
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trends— In the Programmable World, All Our Objects Will Act as One

trends— In the Programmable World, All Our Objects Will Act as One | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
We are surrounded by tiny, intelligent devices that capture data about how we live and what we do. Soon we'll be able to choreograph them to respond to our needs, solve our problems, and even save our lives.
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City College of San Francisco Reaches Pact With a Key Group of Faculty Leaders

City College of San Francisco Reaches Pact With a Key Group of Faculty Leaders | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The City College of San Francisco, which is under pressure from its accreditor to streamline its governance structure and make other changes, has reached a key labor agreement that is expected to save the institution $1.6-million a year, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. The agreement with the Department Chair Council, an unusual bargaining unit for faculty leaders, reduces the number of department chairs to 39 from 61, requires the chairs to work on the campus five days a week, and trims total stipends by $170,000.


John Rizzo, chairman of the college’s Board of Trustees, said the pact was “very important” and will show the accreditor “that we can make labor agreements, that we’re functional.”

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Are Student Loans Destroying the Economy?

Are Student Loans Destroying the Economy? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
No. But by trading cars for college (and homes for homework), some young people are investing in themselves rather than in the economy's biggest-ticket items
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Lisa H. Macklin, former SCUP board member, Comprehensive Facilities Planning, Inc., shares this related link from the Columbus (OH) Dispatch.


Here is the original report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York's Liberty Street.

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Is ROI the Right Way to Judge a College Education?

Is ROI the Right Way to Judge a College Education? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Tallying the costs of and returns on a college education in financial terms is surely slippery business: It depends on who you are, where you come from, where you think you're going, where you really are capable of going, and what might derail or propel you along the way. One's perspective is also skewed by political beliefs, race, and class. And for some, particularly among advocates of the liberal arts, framing the value of education in dollars and cents is a perilous trend that discounts other benefits, like college graduates' tendencies to be more involved in civic and intellectual life.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

This is more than a worthwhile read.

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The End of the Home Computer: Why PC Sales Are Collapsing

The End of the Home Computer: Why PC Sales Are Collapsing | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Worldwide PC sales saw a record drop this quarter, as consumers turn to tablets for their entertainment needs.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Now this is what an industry looks like when it goes into free-fall.

Market research firm IDC reported yesterday that worldwide personal computers had their sharpest drop ever for a single quarter, plummeting nearly 14 percent compared to the first three months of 2012. Among the big players, only one company, Lenovo, shipped as many units as last year. The carnage was worst for HP, which saw its PC sales tumble 23 percent, and ACER, which suffered a 31.3 drop. But as AllThingsD notes, not even Apple escaped unscathed. Its Mac sales slowed 7.5 percent in North America, its top market. 

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Ralph Springett's curator insight, April 15, 2013 5:43 PM

Tablets for learning.

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How MOOCs Could Meet the Challenge of Providing a Global Education | MIT Technology Review

How MOOCs Could Meet the Challenge of Providing a Global Education  | MIT Technology Review | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Putting free U.S. college courses online is only the first step to filling higher education needs around the world.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Right now, in Rwanda, a nonprofit called Generation Rwanda is getting started on an ambitious experiment that is likely among the first of its kind: an entirely MOOC-based university.


Though it is only entering pilot stages later this year, its eventual goal is to create a 400-person university in Rwanda, with MOOCs providing the lessons and teaching fellows guiding students through discussions and problematic areas. To start, the first students will try out a Harvard University course onJustice, and a University of Edinburgh course on Critical Thinking and Global Challenges, says executive director Jamie Hodari. Already, the program has struck a partnership with Southern New Hampshire University to test and certify associates degrees as its startup university gets off the ground, he says.


Hodari believes that as MOOC providers get better at mining their student data to see how an individual is stumbling, the less expert his TA facilitators will need to be in a particular topic, which will help to save costs. The nonprofit’s ambition is to offer full-year tuition for about $1,500 a year or less.

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Kate Maclean's curator insight, April 3, 2013 6:11 AM

I have MOOC-ED and loved it!

Kate Maclean's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:00 AM

I love Moocs!

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new book— "Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality"

Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality

~ Laura T. Hamilton (author) More about this product
List Price: $35.00
Price: $24.29
You Save: $10.71 (31%)
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Writing about this book in Inside Higher Ed, Allie Grasgreen says:


"The students who end up at Midwestern University – a pseudonym for the flagship institution where Armstrong and Hamilton follow a group of women through their college careers, from the dorm floor to a year post-graduation – are socially minded. Thus, to lure and keep those students, institutions have come to structure their academic and social frameworks in a way that accommodates that population.


The result of this 'party pathway' is more than just a substandard education for those students, whose significant family resources and connections -- which set them up for jobs after graduation, regardless of credentials -- allow them to take easy majors and spend as much time if not more drinking as they do studying. It also deters those on the “mobility pathway,” as those low-income students seeking entry into the middle class are both poorly supported and distracted by the party framework. As a result, many of these students struggle to succeed -- meandering through college for six years or more -- or drop out altogether."

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Verity Dogood's comment, April 8, 2013 5:45 PM
While the author makes a valid point - it's not new.Apparently the author and the intended audience never saw "Animal House" Those grey panthers (like me) who remember that also remember John Belushi's comment when they frat was kicked out of university "Seven years of college down the drain" - this has been going on for years.
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Activists at Colleges Network to Fight Sexual Assault

Activists at Colleges Network to Fight Sexual Assault | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Campaigns against sexual assault on campuses have connected people who, while sometimes seeking advice elsewhere, have largely learned from one another.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Campus crisis managers and planners need to be aware of this trend. Maybe we could get ahead of it by changing the structures and processes that are currently inadequate?

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Rechetana Rathore's comment, March 21, 2013 8:55 AM
I think sexual assault on campuses should be totally ban by law. Regards http://vfxconsultancy.com
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SCUP Radio— This is where the answers are

SCUP Radio— This is where the answers are | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Listen to— John Casteen (former UVA president) and Glenn DuBois (chancellor of the Virginia Community College System) about their forthcoming opening and closing plenary sessions at SCUP's 2013 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference at Georgetown on April 7–9: "Is higher education still the gateway for opportunity in America?" They are optimistic!

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Nankouma Condé's comment, March 28, 2013 9:37 PM
translate in french
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League for Innovation, Day 1 | Dean Dad | Behavioral economics and 'initiative fatigue'

"Finally, Diana Oblinger, the President and CEO of Educause, gave a plenary that picked up largely where Sebastian left off.  She went through a host of examples of colleges that are using analytics and other software in fascinating ways, of which my favorite was Austin Peay State University’s program that gives students “top ten” course recommendations for the following semester, complete with projected grades.  The idea is to keep students on track by “nudging” them towards the “right” choices.

As Oblinger went through her examples, I was struck by the heavy (acknowledged) borrowing from behavioral economics.  Behavioral economics uses observed behavior to change the ways that people make decisions.  For example, people are easily overwhelmed by too many options; sometimes they’ll just walk away rather than make a choice.  (Note the parallel to “initiative fatigue.”)  If we don’t have the stomach to mandate decisions, but we don’t want students to just throw up their hands at seemingly infinite options, then we can use “nudging” to push students towards the choices we want them to make.  Top ten lists are a way to do that.  Students are still free to go off the top ten list, but most don’t."

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We also liked this:


"The second presentation, by President Susan Karr and academic vice president Lee Ann Nutt of Lone Star College in Houston, addressed “initiative fatigue.”  Anyone who has worked in administration for very long knows the drill: every year or two a new project with a new acronym comes along, and most of the usual suspects address the same questions they addressed last year.  Over time, the various projects overlap, deadlines start to crash into each other, people start to forget what got said where, and after a few years, people start to adopt a “been there, done that” attitude.

They took a crack at breaking initiative fatigue by setting up a coordinating committee with a master chart of outcomes.  The idea was to map who was doing what, so redundancies could be identified and undue duplication avoided.  (Presumably, it could also help identify the areas of minimal coverage, where future projects would be welcome, and areas of ample coverage, where the horse is well and truly dead.)  Yes, it’s almost a parody of administration to suggest a “committee on committees,” but in practice it can make a lot of sense."

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How Washington Could Make College Tuition Free (Without Spending a Penny More on Education)

How Washington Could Make College Tuition Free (Without Spending a Penny More on Education) | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Washington already spends enough on student aid to cover tuition for each and every public college student in America. Maybe it's time to give that a try?
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Here's a little known fact: With what the federal government spent on its various and sundry student aid initiatives last year, it could have covered the tuition bill of every student at every public college in the country. Doing so might have required cutting off financial aid at Yale, Amherst, the University of Phoenix, and every other private university. But at this point, that might be a trade worth considering. 

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Rechetana Rathore's comment, March 21, 2013 8:58 AM
great article on free college tuition. regards http://vfxconsultancy.com
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What a $10,000 College Education Says About the Downside of Goals

What a $10,000 College Education Says About the Downside of Goals | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

If you think abandoning strategic planning is the way to go, consider what business expert, design thinker, and master strategist Roger Martin has to say.


Even in the fastest paced hi-tech industries, with high levels of uncertainty and constant change, Martin claims that thinking strategically and being strategic in our planning is still critical to our success. Avoiding it, Martin says, just hands the competition the advantage needed to conquer us. An option worth consider is “Emergent Strategic Planning.” It’s intended to account for the concerns we have about rapidly changing technology. The idea is to form loosely conceived goals that are likely to move the organization forward. However, they are malleable and subject to change each as new technology or opportunity emerges, hence the name. It allows for an organization to more rapidly leverage those opportunities or even turn mistakes into new possibilities. It is still possible to forge the roadmap, yet allow for sudden detours.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Nice essay by Steven Bell, who examines strategic perspective and planning for libraries, frequently generalizing to the greater institution. He concludes:


When it comes to setting goals, for our organizations or ourselves, we might be well advised to worry less about the specifics. If we are able to do that, we just might discover that the things we want to accomplish are getting done, and with much less stress and anxiety. Who thinks that’s a bad idea?

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Gregory A. Smith's curator insight, March 14, 2013 11:26 AM

I agree with some of the key premises of this article--for example, that a focus on highly specific goals can waste effort and prove counterproductive, especially in an environment characterized by upheaval (technological and otherwise). However, I found the the title and introductory discussion to be somewhat misleading. There seemed to be an inordinate fusion of concerns about low-cost education and its impact on academic libraries, with improved approaches to planning and goal-setting.

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Pay Increase for Top Administrators Barely Outpaces Inflation

Their median base pay rose by 2.3 percent last year, an improvement over the previous year, an annual survey found.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

While that is not a big jump, it marks a noticeable improvement for the administrators, whose average year-to-year salary increase lagged behind inflation by a full percentage point a year ago.


"We are pleased to see the upward trend in the median increases, and we hope to see that trend continue," said Andy Brantley, president of the association. Administrators' salaries, along with those of faculty and staff, reflect both the health of colleges and the value placed on employees, he said.

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MOOC Professors Claim No Responsibility for How Courses Are Used

MOOC Professors Claim No Responsibility for How Courses Are Used | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Really, though, it is a university’s faculty, and not technology vendors and their collaborators, that is responsible for reining in reckless administrative efforts, says Mr. Noor. “Ultimately, faculty at individual colleges need to be the driving force behind what students at their campuses are using,” he says.


“And if that’s not the case” at San Jose State, says Mr. Noor, then MOOCs are “the least of the faculty’s problems.”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Are MOOCs really this disruptive?

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U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Plans to Add 500 Full-Time Professors

U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Plans to Add 500 Full-Time Professors | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
The hiring spree over the next five to seven years will attempt to restore the size of the university's faculty in 2007, before the recession hit.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

The hires will be made in two ways, said Barbara J. Wilson, executive vice provost for faculty and academic affairs. Some new hires will fill traditional roles in academic departments. Others will be hired in clusters.

The "cluster hires," Ms. Wilson said, will be sorted into the six areas that have been identified by the university's "Visioning Future Excellence at Illinois" project, an effort begun by the chancellor to map out the university's needs for the future. The review focused on two questions: "What are society's most pressing issues?" and "What distinctive and signature role can Illinois play in addressing those issues in the next 20 to 50 years?"

After receiving input from professors, staff members, students, and community leaders, Ms. Wilson said, the focus areas were narrowed to: energy and the environment, health and wellness, social equality and cultural understanding, information and technology, economic development, and education.


"The cluster hires will be distributed across campus, and some may even be cross-department hires," Ms. Wilson said. "They will be the best people we can bring to campus to take what we're currently doing to the next level in those areas."

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What Is College For? - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education

What Is College For? - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Lately there has been a great deal of discussion about the importance of measuring a college's "return on investment." Is the point of a college education quantifiable results or personal and intellectual growth? In pursuit of answers, The Chronicleasked a selection of higher-education leaders.

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For Fun: M.C. Escher Drawings brought to Life via 3-D Printer by Israeli Professor

For Fun:  M.C. Escher Drawings brought to Life via 3-D Printer by Israeli Professor | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Interesting, especially if you know little about 3-D printing.

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Is It Finally Time to Kill the Credit Hour?

Is It Finally Time to Kill the Credit Hour? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Yet, even as we work toward an alternative, the credit hour is gaining new currency in state policy circles and through federal actions related to accreditation. It is very worrying that states have begun to tie performance incentives to simplistic measures of productivity, using that same old credit hour as the de facto indicator of what is “produced” with the time and money invested by students and the state. 

What policy leaders miss is that the credit hour was not designed to document the quality or level of student learning. 

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

We need to take the time and learn from the assessment experiments that are going on all over higher education. We also need to build broad and compelling agreement on what twenty-first-century markers of student accomplishment actually look like. And, soberingly, that work is still in draft form.

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A = Yes. Q = Does Community Engagement Have a Place in a Placeless University?

A = Yes. Q = Does Community Engagement Have a Place in a Placeless University? | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

The disruption of higher education is here and our traditional models of teaching and learning have forevermore been shattered.


It makes this disruptive moment that much more unexpected. For even as I embrace certain aspects of this technological transformation, I would argue that it is a perfect time (or maybe just a last-ditch opportunity?) to make the case for place-based community-engaged learning. The global reach of MOOCs, I want to suggest, may actually help us reconnect with our local communities.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

[T]he vast majority of such MOOC registrants never make it past the first week and only about 10% end up finishing the course. What is thus truly unknown, and what we must figure out, is how we come to think about and enact community engagement both within and against the coming online transformation.


This is the state of community engagement in the disrupted university. It is a precipitous moment where traditional models and norms no longer apply so easily or thoroughly. In some cases, there are immense opportunities to be gained as faculty discover how to make their work public and bring the public into their work. In other cases, there are immense opportunities to be lost as marginalized populations and communities become ever more disenfranchised from the institutions just blocks away, yet gigabytes apart.

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book excerpt: Change is a People Process - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo

book excerpt: Change is a People Process - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

We are pleased to share Chapter One: Change is a People Process (pdf) of the society's forthcoming book, The Human Side of the Strategic Planning Process in Higher Education.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Get your copy in SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo. 


Robert P. Delprino is a faculty member in the Department of Psychology at SUNY Buffalo State. He is a graduate of the SCUP Planning Institute and serves as a faculty trainer for the institute. He is an appointed member of Buffalo State’s Planning Council, which guides the planning and implementation of the college’s strategic plan. He earned his doctorate degree in industrial/organizational psychology from Old Dominion University and his master’s degree in forensic psychology from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York.


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Forecasting Higher Education - OnlineDegrees.org

Forecasting Higher Education - OnlineDegrees.org | SCUP Links | Scoop.it
Discover the technologies that the New Media Consortium are saying will impact higher education in the coming years.
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

Nice.

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Accreditor's new standards raise bar for serving the public— "service" now officially a requirement

“We felt it was important to make a statement -- that education is a public good,” said Sylvia Manning, president of the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

As a result, the commission included language describing how colleges must first serve the public -- rather than themselves or outside interests -- as part of its updated criteria for accreditation. The document lays out standards of quality that colleges must meet to earn accreditation or have it reaffirmed, which is required every 10 years.


The revised standards are getting an early test, as a commission review team last month recommended a sanction of probation for the University of Phoenix, the nation’s biggest university. According to a corporate filing from the Apollo Group, which is Phoenix’s holding company, a sentence in the public good section is what tripped up the university in its bid for reaccreditation.


That language reads: “The institution’s educational responsibilities take primacy over other purposes, such as generating financial returns for investors, contributing to a related or parent organization or supporting external interests.”

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Nankouma Condé's comment, March 28, 2013 9:38 PM
no speate inglise translate in french
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At South by Southwest Education Event, Tensions Divide Entrepreneurs and Educators

At South by Southwest Education Event, Tensions Divide Entrepreneurs and Educators | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Who should lead innovation in education—teachers or entrepreneurs? That key question was in the air here at this year’s South-by-Southwest Edu conference, which brought together a mix of entrepreneurs and educators for four days of panels and a competition for education start-ups.

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The city, the future, and you

The city, the future, and you | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

“Is ‘making do’ the best we can expect in our future? Is the future simply making the best of a bad situation? Will the way forward be reduced to finding a way out?”

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

“The city, the future, and you” is the title of Chapter One, Part One of Glen Hiemstra and Dennis Walsh’ new book. It doesn’t have a title yet, but you can read all of it, in installments, at Futurist.

Hiemstra is the opening plenary speaker at SCUP’s Pacific Region’s 2013 conference March 24–27 at the Auraria Higher Education Center (Denver), Place Making: Strategic Identity + Place Making.

Denver-based conference co-chairs Christine King of JE Dunn Construction and Steven Schonberger of NAC Architecture are excited about the conference kicking off with such a big picture viewpoint. So we thought we’d share parts of Hiemstra and Walsh’ book, ahead of time:

Some people need to know everything before they do anything. They spend their whole life avoiding the unknown, when really they don’t have to know everything, just enough to know enough. Then there’s the “me too” crowd. They don’t think cities have to change anything. They don’t get the new global economic reality. They assume that everything will soon go back to the way it was and all will be well in the end. They’re not about to change a thing. Don’t be one of them. Step out. Make a move. You may not always be right, but the odds are in your favor that you’ll get somewhere.


There’s a shift is coming that’s going to shake the world. ...

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Social capital: the benefit of Facebook ‘friends’

Social capital: the benefit of Facebook ‘friends’ | SCUP Links | Scoop.it

Abstract: This research investigated the role Facebook use plays in the creation or maintenance of social capital among university students in South Africa. Data were collected using questionnaires completed by over 800 students from 7 universities. The questionnaire was obtained from a study conducted in Michigan State University (Ellison N.B., Steinfield, C., and Lampe, C., 2007. The benefits of Facebook “Friends”: social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), 1143–1168.). Empirical research has linked social capital to many positives in society, such as improved mental and physical health, economic well-being, etc. Thus, social capital is important for the success of civil society. This research examined the relationships between Facebook use and the formation and maintenance of social capital amongst university students. The study also examined factors specific to the South African context and drew comparisons to the results of the original study. Analysis of the results suggests a strong association between the intensity of Facebook use and perceived bridging, bonding and maintained social capital. This paper broadens the understanding of Facebook usage by introducing the dimensions of race and age. Facebook usage was found to interact with measures of psychological well-being, suggesting that it might be beneficial to students experiencing low self-esteem and low life satisfaction.

Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s insight:

What reality is, is changing. This may be the most significant external forcer acting on higher education.

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